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OSS Questions

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by G&Lplayer, Apr 14, 2021.

  1. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

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    So it is time to buy an oscillating spindle sander. I have looked at several and I have a couple of questions. First, for body work how many oscillations per minute should I be looking for? Grizzly has several models and says the slower one is better for fine finishes. It is, however, the lower horse power one. Should I worry about not having enough power to sand to the line? How much HP is enough? Any help would be great.
     
  2. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    In general, more HP is better. Are you going to use the sander only for luthierie? How often will you use it? I have a Rigid OSS which I hate. It is marginal at best, and when I use it for larger projects, I really wish I had a real OSS. On bigger wood working projects or on metals I always wish it had more power. So, that said, if you're going to use yours a lot, as in frequently, and on bigger projects, really hard woods or on any metals, I would go with more HP.
     
  3. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    The OSS that I have is the Rigid model.

    It's pretty much an entry level power tool and not intended for any kind of production work.

    It's a cheap machine and it feels like it when I'm using it.

    The motor ain't much - it's just 5 amps, and only 3/8 h.p.

    But - it's got enough power to do what I need for guitar work :).

    I added a 3" diameter drum for mine, and even with the bigger diameter drum it doesn't feel like it's starved for power.

    Same thing when using the belt sanding option - I've never felt like I was bogging the motor when sanding.

    I've got a bandsaw, and I'm able to cut close to the line, so I usually don't need to sand too much off with the OSS.



    If I need to do some serious sanding or grinding, I've got a couple of real belt grinders - a Burr King 1-1/2" X 60" with a 1-1/2 h.p. motor, and a custom built 2" X 72" with a 2 h.p. motor.

    Both motors are variable speed DC motors. Both of these grinders excel at heavy duty grinding on any type of steel and go through wood like a hot knife through butter.

    I can run either one at over 6500 surface feet per minute. When you combine that speed with a 36 grit belt, it'll sail right through alloy steel.



    So, as far as power goes, it really depends on what you plan to use the OSS for.

    I agree with @CapnCrunch about horsepower in general; it's always nice to have that power if you need it.

    But horsepower isn't everything.

    Spindle speed and oscillations per minute are probably more important than h.p. if finish quality is the most important factor.



    I've been real tempted a couple of times when a "real" OSS comes up on my local CraigsList :).

    A "real" OSS with a decent sized cast iron table and a smooth operating oscillating mechanism.

    The better older machines have a closed oil-lubed gear box where the rotational movement is converted to oscillation ;).


    edit: I think I'd look for a longer stroke length in a OSS. It'll help it's efficiency.


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    Last edited: Apr 14, 2021
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  4. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Get the most tool you can afford.

    For guitar work, 1/2 HP is more than enough because the abrasives you're driving are small diameters.
     
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  5. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I have a 2x72 grinder also that I need to upgrade the motor on. I use it for metal working, blacksmithing and knife making. I really want a 2HP 3ph motor with a VFD on it.
     
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  6. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Now-a-days, three phase with a VFD is the way to go.

    Back when I outfitted my belt grinders VFD's were very expensive, so I went with SCR controlled DC motors.

    There were a couple of dealers in town who specialized buying out bankrupt manufacturing companies metal and wood working equipment, so I had good sources for used or surplus stuff.

    Back in the 1990's there were a lot of metal and wood fabricating companies going out of business and consequently lots of good deals on equipment.

    But now, the prices for good new three phase motors and VFD controls are way down from what they used to be.

    For blade making and blacksmithing, having a good, powerful, variable speed 2" X 72" belt grinder sure makes the work go much easier :).


    I find a way to use those belt grinders with my guitar work too ;).

    Roughing in a guitar nut with a 2 h.p. belt grinder might seem like over-kill, but it's such a nice and smooth running machine :).

    I went way down the rabbit hole with bladesmithing - propane forges and two Little Giant power-hammers - lot's of Damascus steel in all sorts of patterns :).


    .
     
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  7. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    Don't want to derail, but where is the emoji for being really jealous about the power hammers?
     
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  8. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

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    Seems like 1/2hp is a good place to start. No 3phase at home so that rules out things I can't afford. Anyone have or used one they like that has a metal table?
     
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'll be honest, I've built 27 guitars to date and finally bought an oscillating spindle sander to use on the last one. It was the least expensive Ryobi model, is perfectly fine but I could have continued to live without it. I suppose if I was building nothing but solid bodies and I didn't want to make templates it would be more useful, but I value my router table and a small belt sander far more than the spindle sander.
     
  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Unless you buy an industrial grade sander, the other ones will be similar. I'd be more concerned with a shaft that doesn't flex more than I would be with how many oscillations you are getting in the model.

    Over the years I've had a Craftsman, Ryobi, and now have the Ridgid OSS. The nicest one of the bunch was a Delta BOSS I bought for work. The Ridgid is OK, but it isn't the be all and end all of sanders.

    The nice part of the Delta was the large cast metal top.

    Sanding kind of sucks...and an OSS makes it better.

    If I had the money and space, I'd go for the Grizzly edge sander that has the smaller drum at one end. Charles Fox was endorsing it.


    6" x 80" Edge Sander w/ Wrap-Around Table at Grizzly.com


    Amazon.com: DELTA SA350K Shopmaster Boss 1/4-Horsepower 1,724 RPM Bench top Spindle Sander with Complete Spindle Sander Set: Home Improvement
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2021
  11. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Aside from a production shop where the use is more "industrial" the smaller OSS that have both spindle and small belt are really versatile for a one-person operation. I have an older Delta BOSS which is only a spindle, but if I were buying today, I'd get a Ridgid, Triton or similar with both spindle and belt that oscillate.
     
  12. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've built dozens of bodies with a Menards store brand spindle sander, it has worked just fine. For what it's worth, I do most of my edge sanding on a belt sander that's attached to a home made table. The table basically holds the belt sander on its side. A spindle sander tends to dig in, and you can make a bunch of scallops all along a sweeping curve. The belt sander is much better in that regard.
     
  13. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I bought the Ridgid a few years ago and actually have been pretty happy with it. I use it professionally for all kinds of stuff. I've built a number of guitar bodies with it, but a ton of other stuff too.

    Yeah, it's not a Cadillac, but it gets the job done. The biggest advantage for me is that it can do multiple things, it'll spin a spindle and run that little belt. It also has the tilting table. I have a small shop

    I haven't looked at any since I bought my Ridgid. That probably means I'm happy with it. But, if there was one with a bit more power, and also had the belt and tilting table, I'd be tempted to research.... It would have to have the same or more flexibility and more juice.

    But, honestly, I'm perfectly happy with my Ridgid.
     
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  14. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I probably wasn't completely clear in my original post. What I meant to say is that the smaller spindle sanders like the ROSS are marginally acceptable if you are only going to use your OSS for making templates in MDF and building a couple guitars a year.

    If you have other big woodworking or metal working projects that you may use the sander for also, you will definitely appreciate a more robust "commercial" duty sander. You may get by with the smaller sander, but every time you use it, you will wish you had the stouter model.
     
  15. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

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    I build a guitar every now and again when I want to inspire myself to play more. So far the current build is number 3 in 4 years. My other work consists of a Lego table and plans for a AV cabinet. I have access to beefier tools at work but I'm trying to make a small space in my garage to work in. I use a work CNC to make templates, I want to use the OSS for finishing bodies and a few other tasks. I like to use my hands to make guitars, it relaxes me. As I look at spindle vs belt/spindle combo, most of the complaints are with the combo tables not staying true so I think a metal table OSS is the way to go. CapnCrunch I understand your point, I wish I could drop the money on a Jet or other high end unit but the money just isn't there. Plus I need something I can move around. Thanks for all the input, what makes things real interesting now is that so many of the models I would consider buying are on back order.
     
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  16. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Something I'd like to add :).

    I'd go for a machine that has a 3" diameter drum or larger.

    The smaller drums have their uses on a guitar body, but I feel that the Rigid would be a lot more versatile if it came with a 3" drum.




    I added a 3" to mine and it makes sanding the larger radius bends on a guitar body a lot smoother.

    The large drum that comes with the Rigid is only a 2", and that extra inch that the 3" gives you is a big difference :).

    The 3" drum is also slightly larger than the big drum on the Rigid belt sanding attachment.



    To use a 3" on the Rigid, all ya need to do is add a washer or two under the drum so it doesn't rub on anything on the down-stroke.

    You can also make up a table insert for use with the 3".

    I sandwiched together one piece each of 1/2" and 3/4" for a total thickness of 1-1/4".


    IMG_1212.JPG


    IMG_1213.JPG


    It makes the Rigid more useful and versatile :).


    If I had my druthers, I'd like to have two separate machines - one oscillating belt sander, and a separate oscillating spindle sander.

    But I don't really have the bucks or the room - so I have a combination machine.

    The oscillating belt sander will really strip off some wood in a hurry with a coarser belt ;).


    .
     
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  17. LeftFinger

    LeftFinger Friend of Leo's

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    I have two separate machines one with the 3" drum

    mostly because I bought the spindle sander first and then came across the Rigid machine a couple years later:D
     
  18. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Funnily, I've owned a Jet OSS for 15 yrs...have never used it myself. I have loaned it out on many occasions and the last borrower bought some accessories for it, which he gifted to me. When I get my new shop completed, I'm sure I'll have a station for it.

    I have several tools like that. Some have never been out of the box. I do long-term planning...and am a master level procrastinator.
     
  19. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    It sounds like a smaller unit would be sufficient for your needs. Like I said above, I have the Rigid OSS. It is handy for relatively light use, and it is nice to have both the spindle and the belt. That said, the first ROSS I bought had a bad bearing right out of the box and nearly caught fire. I returned it the same day I bought it and the next one I got had a badly warped table. I didn't notice the warp right away and ended up having to build a bending jig to bend it flat later. That's not the worst though. My second ROSS also has a spindle that is not square to the table except on two specific opposing sides of the spindle and they aren't on the sides that would make the belt run square to the table. If you are going to get a ROSS, I'd inspect it very, very closely when you get it home and take it back immediately if it has issues.

    Have you looked on CL in your area? I missed a great commercial duty Jet by hours a year or so ago. $2,000+ sander and the seller wanted like $400 for it. Still kick myself.

    This one is a little far away for me, but I keep my eyes open for stuff like this.

    Grizzly Oscillating Spindle Sander - tools - by owner - sale (craigslist.org)
     
  20. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

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    I would seriously consider that unit if it was just a hair closer.
     
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