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Oscillating Spindle Sander Question

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Ekko, Mar 8, 2018.

  1. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    I have a build (my first) coming along slowly. Life has a habit of getting in the way of fun...

    I’m limited in tool access (no bandsaw) and have started cutting out my body with a combination of Japanese Saw and Coping Saw. I’m having a trouble keeping my cuts even and I’m scared to get closer to my lines and take out some of the body (I’ve tried being patient and constantly checking my cuts, but I still drift).

    So my question is, just how close do I NEED to be to the line before I use an oscillating spindle sander to finish removing waste up to the lines?

    Practicality isn’t an issue. Nor potentially time or burning threw many drums of sand paper if it helps my sawing user error. But with that in mind, what is actually possible?

    The wood I’m working with is American Black Walnut (so I’m told; don’t know much about wood other than it becomes guitars) if that matters at all.

     
  2. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    it's just a matter of your personal tactile interface with the tool... get ya some inexpensive construction lumber, and make a test body and practice.... by doing so you can easily develop the skill necessary to make a body every bit as nice as one done on a CNC.


    Ron Kirn
     
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  3. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    So, in theory, removing a half inch or more of waste is fine with the spindle sander as long as I do it carefully and build up my skill with the tool? Just making sure I got your advice right.
     
  4. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    yeah but a saw is faster.. I'd cut as close to the line as your finesse with a saw permits, then remove the remainder with the sander.

    rk
     
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  5. cattzap

    cattzap Tele-Meister

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    Where in Tx are you. I have a really nice wood shop
     
  6. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    Edit: Botched posting attempt; I need my morning coffee. Move along, move along. Nothing to see here.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
  7. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    Thank you for your advice. I really appreciate it. Especially coming from someone such as yourself (not trying to blow smoke up your dress or nothing).
     
  8. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    Austin area. But I’m very occasionally in the Houston area.
     
  9. cattzap

    cattzap Tele-Meister

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    I'm just east of College Station Carlos (Hwy 30 and Fm 244 intersection) I'll be in Austin Sunday afternoon but I doubt if I'd be hauling a big tablesaw with me
     
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  10. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Friend of Leo's

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    Agree, spindle sanders are/were one of my favorite shop tools (I live with a belt sander at the moment). After you practice on pine, maybe move to something harder before you tackle walnut - or get some scrap walnut. Or, consider a $5 coping saw for most of the waist cut, and finish up with the sander. Or a $15 convex spoke shave, or....
     
  11. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    I know The BCS area quite well (Gig ‘em). By Houston area I really meant Huntsville, but people rarely know of the Prison City outside of East Texas. ;)
     
  12. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    Been trying to cut out my body from the blank with a coping saw and Japanese saw, but my saw finesse leaves much to be desired with slanting and crooked cuts. :/

    I’ll definitely practice with the spindle sander on some scrap walnut before taking it to the piece I chose for my body... I definitely had some left over:

     
  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
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  14. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    and I agree with Marty... really . . . trying to make a guitar with entry level tools, or worst just plain old wrong tools is a study in frustration... buy basic tools., or rent them.. or better yet,,,, visit the local High School.. many have evening adult "classes" where you can take the wood working classes and have access to a very fine wood shop...

    If you engage with good tools you wind up with a very nice guitar.. and will look forward to making the next and the next... do it with inadequate tools and the frustration will probably prevent you from completing it, and ya never make it #2...

    I can't recall, but I think I address this very thought in this stuff I did back when my knees didn't hate me so badly.. :p

    Ron

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-technical/201556-fret-leveling-yer-tele-101-a.html

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Tele_template-illustrated-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Tele-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Setup-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Strat-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Strat_template-illustrated-reader-spreads.pdf
     
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  15. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    1/2 Inch was more of an exaggeration/“if I can take that much sure I can take out x” kind of thought. It’s more 1/8 to some parts where it’s not quite 3/8. But I’ll diffently look into your suggestions. Appreciate the help.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
  16. Outcaster

    Outcaster Tele-Holic

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    I'd suggest (obviously) getting as close as you can with the saw and then, if you're still more than 1/8th from the line, go after if carefully with a rasp. I'd draw another line on the other side of the body as well to help keep you're cut with the rasp perpendicular to the top and bottom. Just my 2 cents...
     
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  17. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    80 grid large diameter spindles will hog off a lot of wood. I'd still cut closer than 1/2 inch.

    Make relief cuts from the outside down to the tight bends if you have trouble making turns with your saw (I use a bandsaw on the Tele lower inside horn and cut in from the outside to three locations so I can get those wood chunks out of the way when coming 'round).

    The spindle sander will square up a lot of issues, but remember that it can't put wood back on ;)

    .
     
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  18. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    If you have good dust control and start with sharp rough grit, you can take off as much as doesn't drive you and your motor crazy. Saws and routers don't make as much dust. I hope you don't know and don't find out what it feels like to breathe too much hardwood dust.

    Never skimp on sharpening your tools or buying new blades and abrasives.

    Before I got a bandsaw I got pretty good at using extreme hand control of my sawzall. I just think about those dentists grinding the shell off a raw egg to pass their power tool exam.
     
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  19. Ekko

    Ekko Tele-Meister

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    Thanks! The wealth of information is truly outstanding. Now if only I could find a way to download the books to my iPhone. :)
     
  20. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    In Oz there are "Men's Sheds" which are organised club type groups which have a permanent workshop usually stocked with all the necessary tools for woodworking and more. See if anything like that exists in your area and rock up and ask if they can help you out.

    DC
     
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