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"Original Telecaster Pickup Set"

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by ScottTunes, Nov 22, 2016.

  1. ScottTunes

    ScottTunes TDPRI Member

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    My new bridge pickup squeals in a very unflattering, microphonic way, as if not wax-potted.

    Aren't they s'posed to be wax-potted?

    Although I've had non-wax-potted pickups before, I've not encountered this from Fender pickups before...

    Any clarification from those who know better than me???
     
  2. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    The baseplate may be loose. Heat it up with a hair dryer, be careful if you use a heat gun.

    As far as I know they're wax potted. I'm sure you'll have other responses.
     
  3. AJ Love

    AJ Love Friend of Leo's

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    yes a loose baseplate is possible. I've also had that problem happen when there is a gap between the rubber tubing and the pickup screw!
     
  4. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    +1 on the baseplate. See what might be holding it off of contact, could be a burr on the edge of something. Might try a little double-sided tape during the search for root cause.

    .
     
  5. ScottTunes

    ScottTunes TDPRI Member

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    Ok, I simply tried loosening the strings, re-seating the bridge, and tightening up again... SMALL improvement... When pressing on the bridge plate either behind or in front of the p'up about 85-90% of the ringing/squealing goes away.

    The p'up base-plate does not appear to be separated from the pickup...

    It's a Wilkinson bridge... Maybe I should install a Fender bridge? Or swap the compensated saddles into a Fender bridge?

    I bought the MIM body sans hardware, so I don't possess or know how the original parts behaved... Still experimenting...

    Thanks for your input!!

    And,

    HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO Y'ALL!
     
  6. ScottTunes

    ScottTunes TDPRI Member

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    If the pickup is touching the body (edge of base plate pushing on side of p'up route), will that increase microphonics?
     
  7. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Seems like the bridge plate is not firmly against the body if pressing on the plate cuts the squeal.
    Tightening the bridge mounting screws can actually make this worse, and the screws should only be firmly tightened, or you can actually raise the front of the bridge plate enough to get squealing from the plate vibrating away from the body.
    The mounting screws really only need to keep the plate in the correct location on a string through, and the saddles hold the plate against the body with string tension.
     
  8. Rhomco

    Rhomco Friend of Leo's

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    It never hurts to add two small screws to the front lip of a tele bridge to keep it nice and flat.
    Rob
     
  9. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Belt sand the back of the bridge plate to knock down the high spots. The punching process distorts the plate. When it doesn't sit flat against the body it can resonate.
     
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