Orientation to the modern world, typing & computers 1960'-2021!

teleman1

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Have you ever given a thought about how well you type now, as compared to when you were in college with no computers? I would write out papers long hand and have somne type them for me. I am miles better than I was in typing 22 words a minute with hellecious mistakes that you could, white out, if you were lucky.

So old timers, I bet typing and gettting better at it was something yuo never expected. I never thought or conceived what interaction with a computer would be like in the future. But one thing I knew, I hated the whole concept of,"ME TYPING".

What's your story?
 

JL_LI

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My mother gave me an IBM Selectric from the company she worked for when it went out of business. I typed my master’s thesis on it. My first computer was an IBM PC-XT in 1986 with a ViewSonic color monitor and a dot matrix printer. I used Word Perfect and Lotus form disks “borrowed” from NYU where a friend was a professor.
 

StoneH

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Have you ever given a thought about how well you type now, as compared to when you were in college with no computers? I would write out papers long hand and have somne type them for me. I am miles better than I was in typing 22 words a minute with hellecious mistakes that you could, white out, if you were lucky.

So old timers, I bet typing and gettting better at it was something yuo never expected. I never thought or conceived what interaction with a computer would be like in the future. But one thing I knew, I hated the whole concept of,"ME TYPING".

What's your story?

11th grade typing class . . . 60 wpm on electric typewriter. Used a manual to type a few papers in college. Bought an electric typewriter to take to Officer Training School. Within a few years, computers (software) and printers improved to the point the electric went into the closet. The old USAF Motto was "To Fly and Fight". In the Acquisition Corp, it was "To Fly and Write". I spent 36 years typing for the USAF, and now I'm typing on this silly (I mean wonderful) forum.
 

Toto'sDad

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I attempted to learn typing when I was younger, and gave up on it. When I found myself needing to change the way I was earning my living, typing seemed a necessity. I think learning to type changed my whole life. I secured the last job I had with a resume I designed and typed myself, and printed on my own printer. I worked longer at that job than any other in my whole lifetime.

I never dreamed that when I retired, I would spend as much time on the internet as I have right here on this forum. Being able to type has been handy for this period in my life for sure. My wife used to do any typing that I needed to do, she was able to learn to type in high school and she never lost her skills even though she didn't employ them very much until we got our first computer in 1995.

My hands just aren't designed for two thumbs phone typing. I surely wish that I could type on the phone like my daughter. She can absolutely whiz through a text at the speed of light!
 

teleman1

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Your stories prompted some memories. A close friend of mine typed like 80 + wpm. In class during the tests, he would watch the clock, and STOP typing so he wouldn't be put in advanced and have to do more work.Hysterical. Also, I have heard, in person, somone doing 100wpm on a manual typerwiter. If you heard it in the next room, you would have assume that an assault was being done at your location;Gunfire!
 
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oldunc

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I haven't ever really gotten used to the flat keyboard; I have to look occasionally to keep located. Recently, my touch pad stopped working and I had to start using a mouse. The table I'm using is really too high for typing; my hands come in at an odd angle and I get a lot of double strikes. Generally I'm faster now, and the easy correction/editing is certainly a boon.
 

Festofish

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We got computers while in high school. The library got 2 and there was one classroom with computers where you learned to dos your way into your name flashing across the screen. That was it. Still had typing class. I “typed” this out on my smart phone.
 

AAT65

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I've earned my living on computers since 1986, mostly writing software with some project management now and then... Typing at a reasonable speed with good accuracy helps me to do my job effectively.
I never had any lessons though. I used go hunt for every key, and even as I got faster I watched the keyboard.
When I'd been working like that 4 or 5 years I was working with a guy who could type one thing while talking to you over his shoulder about something else -- he was just a designer (I said to myself)! So I decided if Dave can type that well so can I. So I stopped looking at the keyboard, looked at the screen - and never looked back. My typing went up another couple of notches very quickly.
The final step was when I got a Microsoft Natural Keyboard (which splits the keys into left and right banks). That helps because you keep each hand to the correct zone -- until then I realised I was crossing my left singer over to type N and my right finger to type B!
It drives me a bit crazy when I see software devs who are not fast typists. The keyboard is the tool that lets you transfer the real work - in your brain - into the instructions for the machine: making the transfer as quick and automatic as possible frees up your brain to get more work done.
 
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JL_LI

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Your stoies prompted some memories. A close firend of mine typed like 80 + wpm. In class during the tests, he would watch the clock, and STOP typing so he wouldn't be put in advanced and have to do more work.Hysterical. Also, I have heard, inperson, somone doing 100wpm on a manual typerwiter. If you heard it in the next room, you would have assume that an assault was being done at your location;Gunfire!
This brings back memories of a young engineer I hired right out of college. One day she was looking over my shoulder and she said out loud, “Stop. You’re driving me crazy. You type too slow and you make too many mistakes. You talk. I’ll type.” She could type as fast as I could talk but it didn’t work at all.

My style is to think and write at the same time. I’m always thinking ahead and always checking back for consistency. Written and spoken language are too different to dictate anyway. And then there’s dialect. Language for publication in a scientific journal is different from the language used in a trade rag, which is different still from the language used writing a manual or simplifying something for sales and marketing so sales people can say it and sound like they know what they’re talking about. I’d write and rewrite and then come back a few days later for a final edit. It looked slow and sloppy but it was actually efficient and accurate. I had 30 years on her and at the time, more than 20 years in a highly specialized field. Being able to type is not the same thing as being able to write.
 

imwjl

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My writing and typing were struggles being a boomer that's dyslexic and ADHD before there was much understanding.

Just when I thought computers would be why I don't finish my return college, the Macintosh and Microsoft Word came out. It was truly life changing. Same me who struggled to get a C got As and Bs with same efforts. I ended up with a career in IT.

Something funny about the timing and this message is today I realized how fountain pen collector me has gotten so poor at using them and use them so little these days. On top of that, I'm working at some really complicated work things. With the latest and top technology here, it was inking up a fountain pen and scribbles in a notebook that helped my brain solve some matters.

On the actual typing, it was a struggle back in the day. Now it's second nature and contributes to my horrible handwriting maybe worse than ever.

Same project that got the nice notebook and pens out got my label printer out. I realized I don't even use a marker on tape much anymore. That's typing on a machine too.

4uo3040.jpg
 

rstaaf

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I am 58, had typing class on manual typewriters in High School. If I recall, I could type accurately at 90 wpm.
This was in the late 70s at Coral Gables Sr. High School in Miami. Graduated from High School in 81.
Also had a keyboarding class in college, again on typewriters although they were electric at that point.
This was in the late 80s at a small, private 2 year school. Also learned programming in COBOL there :eek:

I have been in IT in Higher Education for 32 years so I am typing something every day.
I am still pretty quick and still prefer a good mechanical keyboard on my desktops at home and work.
Something about the feel and clickety clack sound of manual keys is satisfying :D
 
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howardlo

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I took typing during summer school between my sophomore and junior years of high school in 1964. The teacher was a friend of my mother and bowled with my mother. Of course at that time it was on old manual typewriters. There may have been electrics around at that time but if so we never saw any.

I did pretty well at it, but my mother was a really good and fast typist. Also on a manual typewriter. I never could get to her level. I didn’t have an electric typewriter until ten or fifteen years later. Picked one up at a garage sale and until I got used to the light touch required I made more mistakes than I ever had with the manual ones.
 

teleman1

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Hey all you fast typists? I assume you are able to play the guitar, "FAST". I can have bursts of speed, but would never able to maintain the speed. Wheras you guys attempt to do Mcglaughlin, Vai, Eddie, and a host of other fusion guitarists. All those guys have influnced my playing/licks, but I am in the Freddie King Arena. While diggging fusion, I just do not have the dexterity & speed. Either I would have to have men with guns to my head for me to repetativly load and repeat till I got it, or I'd be a natural talent and be typing 75 words per minute.
 

trev333

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I never even touched a typewriter at school.... I think there was one in the office....:rolleyes:

all our work had to be hand written..... you couldn't hand in a typed paper even if you had access to a typewriter..

I never had to use a keyboard until getting a PC in the 90's with 'doze...... ;)
 

brookdalebill

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I took typing as an elective in junior high school, 1970-1971.
I was OK.
I got a job when I was 20 at a shop that sold office equipment (typewriters, answering machines, calculators), stereo equipment, TVs, and VTRs (VCRs).
The shop (Berkman’s) also did service on said merchandise.
We sold new Smith-Corona, Royal, and IBM typewriters.
There were two full time typewriter servicemen, and two electronic techs.
We rent/sold all of the merchandise, and the business grew from two to five stores while I worked there, 1977-1985.
After six years, I rose to store manager of the service department.
I worked there 8 years, my longest run at any day job.
The company folded shortly after the founder’s passing in the late 1980s.
The merchandise we sold/rented/serviced is all utterly obsolete.
The store/repair center I managed now now sells monuments (headstones).
Kinda sobering, and (slightly) depressing.
 




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