Opinions on Vibramate Spoiler

Boreas

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Received the replacement and apparently the B50 Schecter uses has B5 specs for spacing of the pins. It would be something I would thing the manufacturer might want to mention on his site. Quite a few Schecters out there with same trem., many semi hollow and others. Kind of PITA to go thru returning the original if there known fitment issues that could have been listed. Anyhow, the company sent out a replacement that is as nicely finished as the other one and that the pins line up on. Will have to wait for next string change install now. I do appreciate dealing with a small company that manufactures here in the US and takes the time to add some personality to their receipts.

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So I'm a little confused - just to clarify - the Schecter ended up taking the "US Bigsby" model?

Yes, I would think it would be worth making mention of this on their website. The best customer service is getting it right the first time!

BTW, to confuse things further, I recently purchased a sand-cast "US B5" that had "Made In Korea" marked on the box! I did not check the spacing. I ended up not needing it so it is waiting for my next project, which usually involves a Bigsby.
 

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TX_Slinger

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So I'm a little confused - just to clarify - the Schecter ended up taking the "US Bigsby" model?

Yes, I would think it would be worth making mention of this on their website. The best customer service is getting it right the first time!

BTW, to confuse things further, I recently purchased a sand-cast "US B5" that had "Made In Korea" marked on the box! I did not check the spacing. I ended up not needing it so it is waiting for my next project, which usually involves a Bigsby.
Of course my model PT is made in Korea also but clearly has "licensed" molded in. Does make me wonder if it's the same as your MIK B5 shown. I forwarded my exact model and year to them to help any future customers. To be clear, this is about the Butchie Bar and NOT the Vibramate String Spoiler..(for anyone joining late here on the 3rd page, images on page 2).
 

Boreas

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Of course my model PT is made in Korea also but clearly has "licensed" molded in. Does make me wonder if it's the same as your MIK B5 shown. I forwarded my exact model and year to them to help any future customers. To be clear, this is about the Butchie Bar and NOT the Vibramate String Spoiler..(for anyone joining late here on the 3rd page, images on page 2).
I doubt they are the same. Easy way to tell - if you have white plastic bushings on the tension bar secured with C-clips, you have a "licensed" model. My MIK B5 does still has the traditional bronze bushing/bearings secured with a set-screw. On my numerous B50/500s (licensed) I have had to swap out the plastic bushings for cheap ball bearings to get it to return to tune properly.

IME, the plastic bushings are just too "sticky" for good tuning stability. Since B50s are so ubiquitous, I believe they are at least part of the reason for the Bigsby haters out there. People spend hundreds on roller-this and locker-that in search of tuning stability on a platform with 5-cent plastic bushings. Bigsby needs to dump these bushings.

On another note, the PRICE on the MIK B5 was about the same as a B50! Perhaps the MIK B5 will replace the B50/500 series, thus ringing the death knell of nylon bushings!! Or perhaps Bigsby will start moving more production offshore, which I would hate to see. I suspect the MIK B5 is a temporary adjustment to the current production/supply issues in the world, but who knows? Bigsby isn't a real user-friendly manufacturer - pretty closed lipped and resistant to innovation. Why are they still using the hated pegs when a drilled-through bar works very well???!!!???
 
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TX_Slinger

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I doubt they are the same. Easy way to tell - if you have white plastic bushings on the tension bar secured with C-clips, you have a "licensed" model. My MIK B5 does still has the traditional bronze bushing/bearings secured with a set-screw. On my numerous B50/500s (licensed) I have had to swap out the plastic bushings for cheap ball bearings to get it to return to tune properly.

IME, the plastic bushings are just too "sticky" for good tuning stability. Since B50s are so ubiquitous, I believe they are at least part of the reason for the Bigsby haters out there. People spend hundreds on roller-this and locker-that in search of tuning stability on a platform with 5-cent plastic bushings. Bigsby needs to dump these bushings.

On another note, the PRICE on the MIK B5 was about the same as a B50! Perhaps the MIK B5 will replace the B50/500 series, thus ringing the death knell of nylon bushings!! Or perhaps Bigsby will start moving more production offshore, which I would hate to see. I suspect the MIK B5 is a temporary adjustment to the current production/supply issues in the world, but who knows? Bigsby isn't a real user-friendly manufacturer - pretty closed lipped and resistant to innovation. Why are they still using the hated pegs when a drilled-through bar works very well???!!!???
I had the B50 plastic bushings (replaced with BiggsFix) but the B5 pins but mine wouldn't be a supply chain issue since it's 2019 production. I'm guessing your theory on the MIK B5 being a supply chain adjustment is correct. I'd like to pick one up for a future project, source?
 

Boreas

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I had the B50 plastic bushings (replaced with BiggsFix) but the B5 pins but mine wouldn't be a supply chain issue since it's 2019 production. I'm guessing your theory on the MIK B5 being a supply chain adjustment is correct. I'd like to pick one up for a future project, source?
Bought mine on eBay, but you have to check the prices closely. Mine was about $125, and most B5s run over $175. Likely depends on what the seller paid for them (and where they are made). This is where I bought mine:


Now they state in the description they are MIK. I don't believe mine said that, but my memory can't be relied on. What were we talking about?.......
 
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TX_Slinger

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Bought mine on eBay, but you have to check the prices closely. Mine was about $125, and most B5s run over $175. Likely depends on what the seller paid for them (and where they are made). This is where I bought mine:


Now they state in the description they are MIK. I don't believe mine said that, but my memory can't be relied on. What were we talking about?.......
:lol:
 

Stephen Douglas

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I doubt they are the same. Easy way to tell - if you have white plastic bushings on the tension bar secured with C-clips, you have a "licensed" model. My MIK B5 does still has the traditional bronze bushing/bearings secured with a set-screw. On my numerous B50/500s (licensed) I have had to swap out the plastic bushings for cheap ball bearings to get it to return to tune properly.

IME, the plastic bushings are just too "sticky" for good tuning stability. Since B50s are so ubiquitous, I believe they are at least part of the reason for the Bigsby haters out there. People spend hundreds on roller-this and locker-that in search of tuning stability on a platform with 5-cent plastic bushings. Bigsby needs to dump these bushings.

On another note, the PRICE on the MIK B5 was about the same as a B50! Perhaps the MIK B5 will replace the B50/500 series, thus ringing the death knell of nylon bushings!! Or perhaps Bigsby will start moving more production offshore, which I would hate to see. I suspect the MIK B5 is a temporary adjustment to the current production/supply issues in the world, but who knows? Bigsby isn't a real user-friendly manufacturer - pretty closed lipped and resistant to innovation. Why are they still using the hated pegs when a drilled-through bar works very well???!!!???
 

TX_Slinger

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Update: installed the Butchie Bar and the one for the US model fits perfectly on my licensed Bigsby. 47mm pin width fits the Butchie Bar labeled for US models and the 50mm spacing fits the one labeled for licensed/imported Bigsbys. Fits tight enough to stay attached to the bar. Definitely worth it over drilling out the bar yourself. It's barely noticeable once installed. If replacing all the strings at once you can string it, attach to roller, the run all the strings under the tension bar at one time, making for a quick string change.

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Most_Triumphant

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Update: If replacing all the strings at once you can string it, attach to roller, the run all the strings under the tension bar at one time, making for a quick string change.
Hey there, I'm new on the forum and found this thread via Google.

I'm trying to deciede between the Vibramate String Spoiler, a string thru bar, and the Butchie Bar. I really don't mind bending my strings and doing it the old fashioned way with pegs when I change all six, but if I break a string live, its not an quick fix like on a TOM, Tele, or Strat.

How is changing an individual string while the other 5 are under tension with the Butchie? Can it be done fairly quick or is the angle of the string hole too severe to thread a string quickly? While the string spoiler doesn't look the greatest and is reported to change the feel of the Bigsby, it seems to have the advantage when it comes to quick string replacement.
 

Boreas

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Hey there, I'm new on the forum and found this thread via Google.

I'm trying to deciede between the Vibramate String Spoiler, a string thru bar, and the Butchie Bar. I really don't mind bending my strings and doing it the old fashioned way with pegs when I change all six, but if I break a string live, its not an quick fix like on a TOM, Tele, or Strat.

How is changing an individual string while the other 5 are under tension with the Butchie? Can it be done fairly quick or is the angle of the string hole too severe to thread a string quickly? While the string spoiler doesn't look the greatest and is reported to change the feel of the Bigsby, it seems to have the advantage when it comes to quick string replacement.
Welcome aboard!!

If the traditional pins are unacceptable, I would simply drill out the holes and do a string-through. It isn't very difficult. Just need pliers, a drill, and a couple drill bits. The steel (?) is soft and drills easily. PLUS - it REMOVES weight!!!:D You can also simply buy one if you don't feel comfortable modifying yours.

EDIT: I may have lied about the tools needed. That is what you would need with the string bar removed from the unit. Removing the bar takes a C-clip tool to remove properly (just one side) and a hex wrench to remove the grub screw. I DID remove mine because I wanted to use a drill press. But now, knowing the metal is quite soft, if I were to do it again, I could likely do it with a hand drill while the B5 is still installed on the guitar. But you would have to be pretty experienced with a power drill to avoid making some big mistakes. :oops:
 

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Most_Triumphant

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Welcome aboard!!

If the traditional pins are unacceptable, I would simply drill out the holes and do a string-through. It isn't very difficult. Just need pliers, a drill, and a couple drill bits. The steel (?) is soft and drills easily. PLUS - it REMOVES weight!!!:D You can also simply buy one if you don't feel comfortable modifying yours.
Thanks, I feel like the weight relief would be negligible and seeing as my Bigsby is on a SG, would be unwelcome. Sorry for the non-Tele content.

Again, I'm mostly concerned with the speed in which an individual string can be replaced. Is the string thru option like you suggest pretty quick for that?
 

Boreas

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Thanks, I feel like the weight relief would be negligible and seeing as my Bigsby is on a SG, would be unwelcome. Sorry for the non-Tele content.

Again, I'm mostly concerned with the speed in which an individual string can be replaced. Is the string thru option like you suggest pretty quick for that?
Yes. It is basically used somehow on most every electric. String-through body, string-through bridge plate, string-through tailpieces, etc.. Thru the hole, over the top, and on to the bridge - easy-peasy.

And just a caution - the Spoiler usually only fits a B5, not a "licensed" B50 - at least without modification. It is a titch too wide. I have one sitting in a drawer because I didn't feel like modifying it. I drilled instead. Seemed a more elegant solution.

Did I mention the fix was FREE??:lol:
 
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stratisfied

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I just pre-wrap the ball ends of all six strings around a pencil and attach from the middle, out.
No spoiler or butchie for me.
If I was gonna mod, I'd find a cheaper alternative to Callaham's grooved roller.
Peace - Deeve

This. Winding the ends to a smaller diameter than the string bar forms a "hairpin spring" that keeps them in place on their own. If changing strings on the fly, just keep a pre-wound set ready.
 

ReverendRevolver

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Hey there, I'm new on the forum and found this thread via Google.

I'm trying to deciede between the Vibramate String Spoiler, a string thru bar, and the Butchie Bar. I really don't mind bending my strings and doing it the old fashioned way with pegs when I change all six, but if I break a string live, its not an quick fix like on a TOM, Tele, or Strat.

How is changing an individual string while the other 5 are under tension with the Butchie? Can it be done fairly quick or is the angle of the string hole too severe to thread a string quickly? While the string spoiler doesn't look the greatest and is reported to change the feel of the Bigsby, it seems to have the advantage when it comes to quick string replacement.

Welcome aboard!!

If the traditional pins are unacceptable, I would simply drill out the holes and do a string-through. It isn't very difficult. Just need pliers, a drill, and a couple drill bits. The steel (?) is soft and drills easily. PLUS - it REMOVES weight!!!:D You can also simply buy one if you don't feel comfortable modifying yours.

EDIT: I may have lied about the tools needed. That is what you would need with the string bar removed from the unit. Removing the bar takes a C-clip tool to remove properly (just one side) and a hex wrench to remove the grub screw. I DID remove mine because I wanted to use a drill press. But now, knowing the metal is quite soft, if I were to do it again, I could likely do it with a hand drill while the B5 is still installed on the guitar. But you would have to be pretty experienced with a power drill to avoid making some big mistakes. :oops:
They do make Pinless B5s, just throwing that out there. I think the spoilers look like poop, the butcher bar looks way better, but pinless is the way to go if you aren't keen on using pliers and threading the string to the pin. It's by far the best solution to the issue, albeit not as cheap as owning a drill press and being really precise with it. I was watching a shop selling kits with the pinless B5s and the V5 vibramate kit for just over $300, which is a deal since the pinless kits go for almost $300 anyway, so it was basically 2/3 off the vibramate.
Happy wiggling.
 




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