Open C chords

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by teledubya, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. teledubya

    teledubya TDPRI Member

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    So I've been getting into Open C tuning quite a bit now, and I'd like to learn how to do more with it, maybe even make it my "go to" tuning. But I don't know any of the "normal" chords in Open C, or any scales. Lately I keep my acoustic in Open C almost all of the time, and I play with a praise band so it would be extremely helpful to be able to learn chords in the tuning. I was wondering if anyone knew of a website or any resource, that shows how to play chords, and scales in Open C.
     
  2. Ethical

    Ethical Tele-Holic

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    This is a really great opportunity for you to learn this information so thoroughly that you'll never forget it.

    How? By sitting down and working out voicings for yourself. Do it systematically and make sure you write down your voicings as you go. It won't be quick and it won't be easy but you'll never regret doing it.

    Good luck.


    Ted
     
  3. teledubya

    teledubya TDPRI Member

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    I'm not sure I'm quite understanding what you're gettin at there. Do you mean just try and figure out by playing different chord shapes in Open C and listening for what chords I'm actually playing?
     
  4. Tim Armstrong

    Tim Armstrong Super Moderator Ad Free Member

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    I think he means to chart out where on the neck the individual notes lie, and then work out where the three tones in each chord are.

    For instance, an E major chord consists of E, B and G sharp, so you'd figure out where those three tones are in each position. Anything that isn't an E, B or G sharp isn't part of the chord!

    I'm personally weak as heck at that kind of knowledge, but part of what I'm working on now is knowing what tones are in each chord (and type of chord: major, minor, seventh, etc), and where the notes are on the neck in standard tuning. I'd think learning that in alternate tunings would be VERY useful!

    Cheers, Tim
     
  5. VWAmTele

    VWAmTele Friend of Leo's

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    Check out this site. You can change the base tuning and then click on different chords to see their formation.
     
  6. jazztele

    jazztele Poster Extraordinaire

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    dubya, what are your strings tuned to for open C? i can think of a few ways of doing that...(CGEGCE, CGCGCE)

    i'd be willing to help, but i warn you, i'm from the "teach a man to fish" school too...:D
     
  7. Ethical

    Ethical Tele-Holic

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    Tim got it right...

    If you start by working out voicings for the C major diatonic scale first (C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, B7b5) then (using the circle of fifths) move on to the G major (up a fifth) and F major (down a fifth) diatonic scales you'll have most of your bases covered and will be well placed to add extensions and alterations later on.

    I say again, it will take some effort but the rewards are worth it.


    Ted
     
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