One Peice Guitar?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by flowwrito, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. flowwrito

    flowwrito TDPRI Member

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    has anybody ever heard of a guitar that is all one continuous peice of wood, the body and neck both? Just wondering. It seems like the sustain and tone on a guitar like that would be amazing.
     
  2. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

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    Maybe, maybe not. It depends on the particular piece of wood.
    But no, I haven't heard of anyone ever doing that.
     
  3. Woodbadge

    Woodbadge TDPRI Member

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  4. Lupo

    Lupo Tele-Holic

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    In youtube there is a number...


    There was a very nice video about a person from Australia (or New Zeeland... not sure) building by hand one... that was realy cool, but I cannot find it.
     
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  5. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    All neck through guitars are essentialy one piece guitars.Their accoustic sustain is ,on most occasions ,massive especially if they are HEAVY ,their tone ranges from great to mediocre.Tone does not equal sustain.
     
  6. flowwrito

    flowwrito TDPRI Member

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    Oh okay. Thanks for pointing that out for me.
     
  7. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    A neck through construction guitar should be just as good as a one piece tone wise and sustain wise IMO. Don't see the difference in glued on body wings vs full body. As long as the neck and body from the nut to the bridge is one piece, that's were all the vibrations count.
     
  8. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

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    I was actually thinking about this while running the other night. Most neck through guitars are not one piece, but several pieces glued together, which actually aids in stability. I think it would also cause less vibration of the wood itself, which allows to strings to vibrate more causing more sustain... Anyway, in my head I was kicking around the idea of using that same construction technique to build essentially a "one piece" guitar. Rather than gluing body fins onto the neck through, just having it all glued together then carve away. Everything that isn't a guitar.
     
  9. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Almost all lap steels are one piece. That's why they are great projects for first time builders. The strings on a lap steel sit at about 3/8" above the fingerboard, so if the "neck" gets a twist it's not a concern. No truss, no fuss.
     
  10. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    If a guitar glued together constitutes a one piece guitar then a dab of glue between the neck and body would qualify. I disagree.
    A true one piece guitar would have to come from a very large tree to get a decent grain throughout.
    My first build came from such a tree but I bolted the one piece neck onto the one piece body. Quarter sawn it still measured 5' by 2-3 feet. That was cut in half as it came from a 10 foot piece. The piece included one edge with bark still on it.
    I can't imagine the size of the original tree but it must have been massive.
    African Bubinga.
     
  11. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I had two, but they weren't made of wood. There was briefly a company called Switch Guitars. They were made out of a material called Vibracell. Some kind of injection molded synthetic. All one piece. Neck, body, fretboard, the whole shebang.

    They came with cheap hardware and ridiculously overpowered and junky sounding pickups. But the guitars themselves were cool. I eventually sold them on, but they were good instruments.

    As with most things guitar though, not traditional enough to sell and keep the company in business. Guitarists are such an over the top conservative crowd when it comes to anything new and different.

    One major flaw- I called the customer service line, to ask what I felt was a very important question- how do you refret one? With it all being one piece, and for all practical purposes plastic, can it even be done?

    The rep acted like I was crazy. He first asked "why would you need to refret a guitar?". To which I answered that they eventually wear out and can't be leveled any longer. At that point, if you wish to use the guitar, they need to be replaced. He then informed me that he'd been playing for decades and had never needed to refret a guitar, or known anybody who had. Weird, but ok. Back to the main question, can it be done?

    He told me he had no idea. They hadn't thought of it, because who ever needs to replace frets? I got the feeling the whole thing was just annoying him, so I wished him a good afternoon, hung up, and traded the Switch guitars for a real nice bike and skateboard.
     
  12. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    ...would really like to see a photo of this guitar, if you have one.
     
  13. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It continues to evolve with even more mods in the future such as hollowing it out and refitting with a modern bridge and humbuckers. 14 lbs. nuff said.
     
  14. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    Beautiful. digging the reverse plate, too.
     
  15. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks Teletimetx. I kept hitting the switch when I first owned a Squier and MIM teles and so I reversed the plate and even cocked the switchplate to one side a bit to make more room. I may switch it back since I am used to it the normal way now on my other tele. I was inspired by a bubinga Strat and at the time could find no examples of a Tele. That was my challenge 2012 build under an old name. It was very educational to build one. All fear of messing with guitars disappeared after what I learned doing it under the expert advice of many great folks right here in TDPRI. It is as close to a solid guitar as they come without the neck being part of the body which could have easily been done. The rules in 2012 stated one piece body and one piece neck. I took it literally and used no glued on tops although apparently all that was indeed allowed. No regrets anyway. I love that thing. I made 2 necks and 2 bodies out of that wood but gave the LP style one away to a youngster who showed interest.
     
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