Old English (As in the original Anglo Saxon language) versus the English of today.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Blazer, May 13, 2020.

  1. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

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    I grew up in Dundee until I was 8 (I'm Asian). When we moved back to my parents' country, they put me in an English speaking school. Yet, no one could understand me.
     
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  2. OldPup

    OldPup Tele-Meister

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    Atlantic Isles is how The Great Courses Audible books refer to Britain and Ireland. And yes, you are of course correct. Thoroughly washing text off of paper would destroy the paper, making it difficult to reuse.
     
  3. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair Tele-Meister

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    For written documents that's correct. For verbal communication between nobility it was French,hence the term.

    English nobles didn't stop using French until the 100 Years War. It was hard for the common footsoldiers to give their lives for "King and Country" when the lords both spoke the same tongue.
     
  4. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Friend of Leo's

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    If I drink 9 pints of Guinness I speak it myself

    I suppose I should not be surprised at the volume of cunning linguists here, but for those outside Englandland I would recommend looking up Radio 4's back catalogue of podcasts called 'Word of Mouth'. Single posts here have had entire episodes dedicated to the topic, and there are years worth available to download. Depending on topic and guest, you might not find every one interesting

    Everyone say a prayer for Michael Rosen, even us atheists
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2020
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  5. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    Concerning the odd situation where the official language of Ireland is Irish and is on all the signs, yet very few people actually speak it, here is a short comedy film about it.

    The old man in the pub is played by Frank Kelly, by the way.....Father Jack.

     
  6. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    I agree, 'Atlantic Isles' could include everything from the Falklands to Greenland. 'British Isles' is correct for referring to the islands of Britain and Ireland, but it understandably isn't quite a neutral term, since 'Britain' is often used as a synonym for 'England'.

    Similar situation for 'Ireland' which refers to the entirety of that island, not just the Republic of Ireland, but is often used to mean the just the Republic.
     
  7. Cloodie

    Cloodie TDPRI Member

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    I was watching someone on Youtube a few days ago playing a strategy game and they referred to the north coast of Scotland as northern England! I did post a comment lightheartedly mentioning it and asking how he was getting along in Southern Canada :D
     
  8. TG

    TG Doctor of Teleocity

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    I wouldn't get my knickers in a twist about the term 'Atlantic Islands' because, for the purpose of this discussion, the relevant islands would be the British Isles and perhaps the Faeroes and Iceland.....and I'm not sure how the people of the time referred to them anyway...so 'Atlantic Islands' might well be as good as any a way to put it.
     
  9. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair Tele-Meister

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    I've never saw the term "Atlantic Isles" before this thread.


    Very weird since I've read about early British and Irish history for 40 years. The Ancient Greeks referred to Britain,Ireland and the Western Isles as "The Evening Isles,beyond the Pillars of Heracles."
     
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  10. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Tele-Meister

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    I seem to remember an edition of the Onion that was written in old English...
     
  11. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I cant tell you what the differences are.
    I'm old but, not that Olde.
     
  12. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair Tele-Meister

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    It's getting stranger, Googled the term "Atlantic Isles" and got a wiki link. Link mentioned it's use in Norman Davies book " The Isles"

    Complete rubbish, Davies uses the term "Midnight Isles", a bit later than the Greeks' "Evening Isles" but a similar meaning.
     
  13. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    The nomenclature of the various bits of the Bristish Isles can be very confusing and a lot of the confusion comes form the complex history of the various bits. The Atlantic Isles are the rocky bits in the Atlantic near the mainland. The Shetland Isles are diferent and the Orkneys even more so. East coast islands are not called the North Sea islands or East Coast Islands but refferred to by their individual names, never collectively. England, Scotland and Wales are all seperate countries but Wales does not, technically,have a king or queen but a prince who is English and does not rule there. Wales comes under the monarch of Gt Britain and Northern Ireland as Wales is a part of Gt Britain so comes under that monarchy. England and Scotland share a ruler but before the Stuarts they did not. The ruler though is known as the Queen (or King) of England or Scotland when in that country in person. England is made up of various counties some of which were once seperate countries. Even today some of those counties claim they are seperate, in spirit, if not fact. I certainly agree that dialects are disappearing or at least reducing in their incomprehensibility. I did a thesis on Neolitihic art in the late 60s and travelled all over Gt Britain looking at stone circles as part of that. My natural accent at that time was North Essex, I often found it nearly impossible to understand some of the accents I came across in the more rural areas of England. Having to resort to sign language to communicate with a fellow English man would seem strange, but at times I had to, especially with some of the West Country dialects. Visiting those same areas a few years ago I found those accents and dialects had been well and truly smoothed out into comprehensibility. More's the pity.:)
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2020
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