Old country pickin help

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by 57fenderstrat, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    hey everyone ,

    I have hardly ever listened to any country at all however lately I have grown pretty interested in trying to get some of that vocabulary into my playing. I’m not having much luck finding what I want on YouTube.

    Are there like common chromatic note choices or is anything fine as long as I resolve to the target note?

    Mostly 1 4 5’s ? Other common chord progressions?

    Common diminished chord subs ?

    I just need to be pointed in the right direction because I don’t know many country artists. Right now I’m just kind of tooting around with 6th intervals on the G and E string while I mute G

    Below is a recording my uncle is playing guitar on and I’m trying to get into this ballpark. There is a lead in the middle

     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
    RodeoTex, DonM and Telecaster88 like this.
  2. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,775
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Location:
    meridianam altum centralis
    For the distinctive sound on the lead and accents, dyads (two note combinations) and triads largely on the D, G, and B strings are usually used. You learn to shift up and down the neck, usually on the D and B string, or G and B string. The positions resemble chord partials. Its nearly universal to all country music, and really punches up about any tune to throw in a break or accent with these shifts.
     
    57fenderstrat likes this.
  3. G-52

    G-52 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    306
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2017
    Location:
    Denver, Co
    So much to learn and lots of fun; chasing chords (mostly 1 4 5, occasionally minor 6), major (and minor) pentatonics, thirds and sixth intervals, bends, flat thirds and sevenths... chromatics, hybrid picking, rhythm and lead, playing the melody, on and on.... I’d recommend taking a good course on line; Country Survival Guide taught on Tru Fire by Jason Loughlin is a great course. Good luck and enjoy! ... Oh, and if you like, listen (and play to) Merle Haggards songs:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
    57fenderstrat likes this.
  4. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,956
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Best way to learn is to start playing some country leads. One of the members (ADinNYC) here just posted some really good tabs in this thread

    Also I had a great teacher tell me that "music is like food; you are what you eat". So make sure you're listening to the players you want to sound like
     
    suthol and 57fenderstrat like this.
  5. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    Awesome ! I appreciate your guys input, I will check out Merle Haggard. Any other guys I should look for? I come from a classic rock and jazz background but don’t really know any country artists.
     
  6. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    7,448
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana
    Ok, here's a start:

    Jimmy Bryant
    Lester Flatt
    Don Helms
    Zeke Turner
    Maybelle Carter
    Norm Stephens
    Speedy Haworth
    Hank Garland
    Luther Perkins
    Grady Martin
    Leon Rhodes
    Chet Atkins
    Joe Maphis
    James Burton
    Doc Watson
    Merle Travis
    Gene Moles
    Don Rich
    Roy Nichols
    Phil Baugh
    Clarence White
    Glen Campbell
    Jerry Reed
    Roy Clark
    Albert Lee
    Norman Blake
    Tony Rice
    Clint Strong
    Redd Volkaert
    Junior Brown
    Danny Gatton
    Vince Gill
    Pete Anderson
    Jim Campilongo
    Brent Mason
    Brad Paisley

    and a bunch more younger guys playing right now.

    It's not just a vocabulary: it's a musical world.
     
    Telecaster88 and 57fenderstrat like this.
  7. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    Excellent! It’s time for me to explore this uncharted world. Thanks guys
     
  8. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    upload_2019-9-12_19-16-41.jpeg

    I bought this record the other day because he was the only country guy I really knew of. I love it and that album cover is so cool
     
    Telecastoff1 likes this.
  9. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    36,361
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    cool record! I'd suggest you listen to some Johnny Cash and Buck Owens from that period... look up the thread 'Being Don Rich' it has a bunch of what you are looking for...

    in the solo in your uncle's tune he mixes major and minor pentatonics which was common for Don Rich to do on Buck's tunes...
     
  10. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    Awesome ! Thank you I will, I am excited to have all this new stuff to listen too. I have been feeling stale playing the same old minor and dorian licks and can’t wait to listen to something that is new to me
     
    G-52 likes this.
  11. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,484
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Location:
    Western Canada
    That was very enjoyable.... your uncle was happening, some great picking in that tune.

    There has been so much great advice above, so I don't have much to add... other than not to try and learn too much too quickly. Country music is a melting pot of styles.... if you uncles style intrigues you, I'd suggest looking up Roy Nichols (Merle Haggard), Don Rich (Buck Owens) & Jame Burton (Emmyloud Harris, Elvis, etc...) to get going... then expand from there. There should be a lot to get you going on the net with those three players.
     
    57fenderstrat likes this.
  12. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat TDPRI Member

    Age:
    28
    Posts:
    83
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Binghamton NY
    Cool thanks ! I wanna pick some things up from him but he doesn’t play out much now. He picked out my first guitar and I wanna play some stuff he likes. He just learned by ear so it’s hard for him to explain what he is doing he just kinda plays it. I was also pretty ignorant about country until I bought a Chet Atkins record and heard how Jazz like it was. I love Jazz but never liked how Jazz guitar sounded compared to like the saxophone or trumpet. This world of music is what I have longed to play like all along without even knowing. Thanks for the tips !
     
  13. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,484
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Location:
    Western Canada
    Although Chet grew up listening to the country/bluegrass music coming from Kentucky and Tennessee, he was influenced heavily by the French guitar player Django Reinhardt. If Chet's "jazzy" approach is something you really like, find some Gypsy Jazz recordings... in particular some Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli. Of course... in the 80's Chet became really good friends with, and recorded with George Benson so that influence is there as well... but his earlier influence was Django... mixed with Merle Travis ;)

    That brings me back to my point that there is no "single style" of country music, only identifiable periods that different people will associate with it. It is heavily influenced by everything around it, and changes/adapts with all those changes. We guitar players might zero in on the chicken pickin or travis pickin, but that's just a small portion of what country music has to offer.

    Just my 2 cents... :)
     
    Telecastoff1 likes this.
  14. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    1,316
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2003
    Location:
    Midland TX
    Key to that sound...slap delay and sopping wet Reverb. Double stops often get too busy, so rapid single notes are occasionally the better choice.

    Yes, diminished positionings are common in the genre.

    One tip: when I was learning this style of picking (which coincidentally is similar to 85% of what I’m hired to do ) an old picker from the 50s/60s taught me picking on the upstroke as well as downstroke is pretty much necessary
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.