OK, this is either hideous or genius, your call... Verso Instruments

Peegoo

Doctor of Teleocity
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When it all comes down to what a guitar is--there has been very little true innovation through the past 80 years or so. This latest thing is identical to every other electric guitar except for the materials and appearance. Everything else is the same.

Only two real innovations come to mind.

- Synth control from the form factor of a guitar
- Multi-scale (fan frets)...which IIRC was invented in the 1920s but didn't gain traction

There have been lots of other attempts, such as Bond's ramp 'fret board' and Gittler's fish skeleton, but they didn't catch on and have become a footnote in the history of the instrument.

Guitar players are a fickle bunch and generally not very adventurous.

Nostalgia is such a powerful drug.
 

draggindakota

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I kinda dig it. The ideas, not so much the execution. I really don't like the headstock, and the string angle looks like it would give you tuning issues. If anyone wants to donate one for scientific research I certainly wouldn't say no lol.
 

kilroy6262

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PA
It's interesting as an abstraction, but it's gonna look silly hanging from someone's shoulder by a strap. Unless it's Todd Rundgren in a space suit.
I was thinking of Gary Neuman, or Aldo Nova. I could also envision Prince playing one of these. There are a bunch of other guitarists/bands that fall into the artsy-fartsy avant garde category that would lap this thing up just because it's different, and then dispose of it when they see someone else playing it.
 

David Barnett

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I was thinking of Gary Neuman, or Aldo Nova. I could also envision Prince playing one of these. There are a bunch of other guitarists/bands that fall into the artsy-fartsy avant garde category that would lap this thing up just because it's different, and then dispose of it when they see someone else playing it.

Or St. Vincent, if she didn't already have a signature model.

But not for TDPRI John with cargo shorts and a bumched shrit.
 

Mo-J

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Hideous. But they stole my idea of pickups that can slide fore and aft. (In truth, I only thought to have the neck pickup slide...on rails mounted under the pick guard.)
Rowe Industries, Toledo, OH manufactured DeArmond brand pickups for a variety of different stringed instruments from the 1930's through the 1960's. The intention of these pickups or "guitar microphones", as the packaging referred to them, was to allow an acoustic guitar to be amplified without disturbing the acoustic tone of the instrument by permanently installing the pickup into the solid wood top of the guitar. Flat top guitars (Spanish or western guitars with center oval soundholes) were easy to attach a pickup to but the f-holes of an archtop are not located under the strings so a more ingenious method was necessary. DeArmonds were available with two different methods for attaching to the archtop; the neck rod, or string clamp and bracket (aka "monkey on a stick").

The DeArmond was the original floating pickup, later copied by Kent, Sekova, and other brands. The top model, the Model 1100 Adjustable Rhythm Chief, was often seen on D'Angelicos, Guilds, and other top-of-the-line archtops from the period. They were generally supplied with one or two-knob control boxes, either hardwired with cords, screw-type mini-microphone connectors or, on later versions, a 1/8" mini-phone jack. The two-knob versions came with a "rhythm" switch push button (to change the tone and volume quickly when the player switches from rhythm to lead playing).

(Pictured is a Rhythm Chief 1000)

PS: I bought a s/h late 50s Hofner Committee many moons ago - with a DeArmond 'monkey on a stick' fitted in untouched condition. These DeArmond original pickups (there are also re-issues available) in original condition are fetching over $500 (which is probably around half as much as the guitar would nowadays). I recall the guy who bought it from me, however, taking a dislike to the sliding DeArmond pickup and having it cut down to size and fixed in one position. An expensive chop in retrospect!
 

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sloppychops

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Rowe Industries, Toledo, OH manufactured DeArmond brand pickups for a variety of different stringed instruments from the 1930's through the 1960's. The intention of these pickups or "guitar microphones", as the packaging referred to them, was to allow an acoustic guitar to be amplified without disturbing the acoustic tone of the instrument by permanently installing the pickup into the solid wood top of the guitar. Flat top guitars (Spanish or western guitars with center oval soundholes) were easy to attach a pickup to but the f-holes of an archtop are not located under the strings so a more ingenious method was necessary. DeArmonds were available with two different methods for attaching to the archtop; the neck rod, or string clamp and bracket (aka "monkey on a stick").

The DeArmond was the original floating pickup, later copied by Kent, Sekova, and other brands. The top model, the Model 1100 Adjustable Rhythm Chief, was often seen on D'Angelicos, Guilds, and other top-of-the-line archtops from the period. They were generally supplied with one or two-knob control boxes, either hardwired with cords, screw-type mini-microphone connectors or, on later versions, a 1/8" mini-phone jack. The two-knob versions came with a "rhythm" switch push button (to change the tone and volume quickly when the player switches from rhythm to lead playing).

(Pictured is a Rhythm Chief 1000)

PS: I bought a s/h late 50s Hofner Committee many moons ago - with a DeArmond 'monkey on a stick' fitted in untouched condition. These DeArmond original pickups (there are also re-issues available) in original condition are fetching over $500 (which is probably around half as much as the guitar would nowadays). I recall the guy who bought it from me, however, taking a dislike to the sliding DeArmond pickup and having it cut down to size and fixed in one position. An expensive chop in retrospect!
Yeah, you're right about that Dearmond having the sliding pickup. I envisioned something more streamlined for a Tele. Just a slot on either side of the pickup, with the rails mounted underneath the pick guard. Small thumbscrews to allow tightening of the pickup so it won't move around once it's where you want it.
 

DugT

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When it all comes down to what a guitar is--there has been very little true innovation through the past 80 years or so. This latest thing is identical to every other electric guitar except for the materials and appearance. Everything else is the same.

Only two real innovations come to mind.

- Synth control from the form factor of a guitar
- Multi-scale (fan frets)...which IIRC was invented in the 1920s but didn't gain traction

There have been lots of other attempts, such as Bond's ramp 'fret board' and Gittler's fish skeleton, but they didn't catch on and have become a footnote in the history of the instrument.

Guitar players are a fickle bunch and generally not very adventurous.

Nostalgia is such a powerful drug.
I think another reason for lack of big breakthrough guitar innovations is there isn't much room for improvement. Many geniuses have played guitar over the centuries and I'm sure they gave it some thought but couldn't think of a way to improve it. A big exception to this is electric guitar. They have lower action, more ergonomic bodies, easier volume control, effects pedals, processors. truss rods, whammy bars. I'm sure I left out a lot of things.

Geniuses are responsible for other huge innovations in music. Now you don't have to play guitar to listen to good clean guitar music. You can listen to a record, cassette, download, the radio, or a youtube video. If you like a challenge, play guitar. If you just want to listen to good guitar music, there are many excellent options.

Often I wonder why I even bother playing guitar. It is work. Do smart people just listen to good music while doing something even more fun, like playing a video game?

If electric guitar is too antiquated for you, there are easier options like keyboards. How about a harp? If you want portability, get a harmonica. If you want an instrument that is better in some ways than a guitar, you need to consider other instruments.
 
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AAT65

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May 29, 2016
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View attachment 980300

I don't have words to express my immediate feelings about these guitars. I don't own one, so I really can't, but I mean every element gets a "WTH":
- Artsy-fartsy folded sheet metal body.
- Neck that looks like it was made by sawing a baseball bat in half. No, really, just LOOK at the thing.
- Neck attached by one screw. ONE.
- Those hemispherical fret ends though... *chef's kiss*.
- Flat pickups. Like REALLY flat.
- Aaaand the kill shot -- The pickup mounting. That's either genius or stupid, there is no middle ground. In my opinion, that is. I've used dead pickups as cool fridge magnets before, but...

Needless to say, I would never buy one for myself, but if someone were to be so generous, I wouldn't turn it down. I don't think I'd get around to playing it for a few days though; I'd spend hours turning it over and over in my hands, going "Look at this thing. Just LOOK at it. I mean, really, just.... what? WHAT? WAAAAAAAT? No freakin' way!"

What do you think?
Very interesting ideas in there imho! I'd rather see a straighter string pull at the nut and it's possible that a flailing rhythm hand could wreak havoc with the pickups, but overall more good than bad imho.
 

Volcanicash01

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Joined
Apr 8, 2022
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78
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Mayenne France.

View attachment 980300

I don't have words to express my immediate feelings about these guitars. I don't own one, so I really can't, but I mean every element gets a "WTH":
- Artsy-fartsy folded sheet metal body.
- Neck that looks like it was made by sawing a baseball bat in half. No, really, just LOOK at the thing.
- Neck attached by one screw. ONE.
- Those hemispherical fret ends though... *chef's kiss*.
- Flat pickups. Like REALLY flat.
- Aaaand the kill shot -- The pickup mounting. That's either genius or stupid, there is no middle ground. In my opinion, that is. I've used dead pickups as cool fridge magnets before, but...

Needless to say, I would never buy one for myself, but if someone were to be so generous, I wouldn't turn it down. I don't think I'd get around to playing it for a few days though; I'd spend hours turning it over and over in my hands, going "Look at this thing. Just LOOK at it. I mean, really, just.... what? WHAT? WAAAAAAAT? No freakin' way!"

What do you think?
It looks too dangerous to hang around yer neck! See my metal maven! It IS dangerous to hang around the neck! It weighs 13 pounds! Sustain for days though!
 

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Cosmic Cowboy

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New Mexico
Equal parts musical instrument and spaded shovel. When the electric grid succumbs to Russian hackers, you can use it to dig holes and bury your valuables. Points for multi-purpose uses.
 

oregomike

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Joined
Mar 28, 2019
Posts
1,476
Location
Hood River, OR

View attachment 980300

I don't have words to express my immediate feelings about these guitars. I don't own one, so I really can't, but I mean every element gets a "WTH":
- Artsy-fartsy folded sheet metal body.
- Neck that looks like it was made by sawing a baseball bat in half. No, really, just LOOK at the thing.
- Neck attached by one screw. ONE.
- Those hemispherical fret ends though... *chef's kiss*.
- Flat pickups. Like REALLY flat.
- Aaaand the kill shot -- The pickup mounting. That's either genius or stupid, there is no middle ground. In my opinion, that is. I've used dead pickups as cool fridge magnets before, but...

Needless to say, I would never buy one for myself, but if someone were to be so generous, I wouldn't turn it down. I don't think I'd get around to playing it for a few days though; I'd spend hours turning it over and over in my hands, going "Look at this thing. Just LOOK at it. I mean, really, just.... what? WHAT? WAAAAAAAT? No freakin' way!"

What do you think?
Looks like a students industrial design project. Cool "outside-the-box" design thinking, A+, but a big real world no thank you.
 

BlueGillGreg

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
266
Location
New England

View attachment 980300

I don't have words to express my immediate feelings about these guitars. I don't own one, so I really can't, but I mean every element gets a "WTH":
- Artsy-fartsy folded sheet metal body.
- Neck that looks like it was made by sawing a baseball bat in half. No, really, just LOOK at the thing.
- Neck attached by one screw. ONE.
- Those hemispherical fret ends though... *chef's kiss*.
- Flat pickups. Like REALLY flat.
- Aaaand the kill shot -- The pickup mounting. That's either genius or stupid, there is no middle ground. In my opinion, that is. I've used dead pickups as cool fridge magnets before, but...

Needless to say, I would never buy one for myself, but if someone were to be so generous, I wouldn't turn it down. I don't think I'd get around to playing it for a few days though; I'd spend hours turning it over and over in my hands, going "Look at this thing. Just LOOK at it. I mean, really, just.... what? WHAT? WAAAAAAAT? No freakin' way!"

What do you think?
Way back in 1950 some repair guy who couldn't even play made a "guitar" from A FLAT PLANK OF WOOD! It had an ALMOST STRAIGHT NECK that was (get this!) SCREWED TO THE BODY! The tuners were SIX ON A SIDE, and there was a SINGLE MAGNETIC PICKUP SLANT-MOUNTED to a A STEEL ENCLOSURE. Crazy, right? I wonder what ever happened with that amp repairman and his insane "guitars?"
 




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