Oiling a neck to finish

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Slowtwitch, Apr 22, 2019.

  1. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

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    So my fist neck build is coming along very nicely and the wood feels like satin or velvety after 600 grit sanding. The wood I used is very fine, closed grain (Sneeze wood) and I don't think a clear coat will do it justice. So thinking just to oil it

    We don't get shellac oil in SA, but I was wondering whether I can just use Teak oil or Linseed oil?

    (I use linseed on all my Rosewood fretboards)

    How do I apply it to the raw wood? Just wipe on with cloth, or should I mix it with thinners for a first layer to seep in easier/deeper?

    Any other advise?

    IMG_20190421_175325.jpeg
     
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  2. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I use Tru Oil, which is actually a kind of catalyzed finish that is used on gun stocks. Durable, but easy to apply, easy to stop at whatever stage of coating you like (it goes on in VERY thin coats), and not super toxic, so you can work with it indoors. Looks nice too!
     
  3. RolandG

    RolandG Tele-Meister

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    Having used Tru-Oil, and various types of Danish Oil, I prefer Osmo 3023. It doesn’t colour the wood as much as the others. It can seal the wood with fewer coats, meaning a thinner finish. Now, is it available in South Africa ...
     
  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    What is "sneeze wood"???
     
  5. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

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    Indigenous to South Africa, considered a rear wood and great to work with except it leaves a gal taste in your mouth :confused:
     
  6. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Okay, now you gotta tell us what a "rear wood" is and what a "gal" taste is! :D
     
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  7. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

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    well, if'n it was me, with just an oil finish, I'd burnish the back of the neck first, and maybe again after the first application of oil.
    a smooth hard metal rod rubbed back and forth, firmly, with the grain. the shaft of a large screwdriver will work if ya don't have a dedicated burnisher.
    compresses all the fibers and makes it slicker than your average sneeze wood neck.
     
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  8. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    Linseed oil will work although it takes time and some hard physical work. Use boiled linseed oil, not raw linseed oil. The raw takes too long to stop being sticky. You just wipe the oil on the wood and wipe off all the extra. Wait at least 24 hours for the oil to react with the air and stop being sticky. The oil goes into the wood just fine without using thinner.

    You can't use sandpaper on linseed oil. You also can't build up a film of finish above the wood. The finish is soaked into the wood, not laying on top. To make a nice shine after the last coat you buff the finish with a soft rag. This step takes a lot of muscle power. You are rubbing it so fast and hard that the finish gets hot. This rubbing step is work but it really makes the wood look beautiful.
     
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  9. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Another vote for Tru-Oil....I used it on a mahogany neck from Warmoth. I just built it up with MANY thin coats, lightly steel-wooling every three or four coats. It has a very comfortable "slickness" now. It was easy to work with.
     
  10. tvvoodoo

    tvvoodoo Tele-Afflicted

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    I have used tru oil. Be careful with linseed oil, also known as black mildew food
     
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  11. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've used Tung oil, the "pure" tung. Many tung oil products are mostly linseed with a little tung mixed in. Belhen sells the pure tung. It was easy to simply wipe on a thin coat with a clean paper towel twice a day until it looks thick enough, maybe 15 coats. It adds a subtle olive green color to the wood. It took about 30 days to cure until it feels nice and hard. I polished it up with auto polish. It has proven to be quite durable.
     
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  12. svMike

    svMike TDPRI Member

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    I also refinished a maple neck (actually the whole guitar) with pure tung oil cut with mineral spirits. It took a lot of coats; basically keep applying it every hour or so until it stops absorbing. 30 days to fully cure, it will be sticky until then. Product is from https://www.realmilkpaint.com/.

    I sanded to 1000 (just because I had it lying around and wanted to see what it would feel like). It has been 4 months and still feels the same with daily use. Water beads up in the surface and rolls right off. Smooth, fast, not sticky. It is a matte finish. It can have a bit of gloss with wax, but I like the matte look. I tinted with Transtint red mahogany + bright red in water.
     
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  13. warrent

    warrent Friend of Leo's

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    Evidently a wood that makes you sneeze.
    Highly irritant, aromatic peppery oils, containing nieshoutol are produced by the wood, causing violent sneezing by woodworkers after sawing or sanding.
    http://pza.sanbi.org/ptaeroxylon-obliquum
     
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  14. Treadplatedual

    Treadplatedual Tele-Holic

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    It also feels amazing as far as necks go.
     
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