1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Oil paint as colour coat under Tru Oil

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Matthias, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Cheers. If I'm French polishing it on, I'm not sure why I think I need to knock it back much, anyway. I have some 2500 grit... according to research that's a lot less abrasive than the oft-used 0000 so might use that lightly every so often on these test oieces. I'm anticipating 15-ish thin coats going on the people who have kindly shared their experience on here over the years.

    When I finish this plank I might have to bolt a neck onto is and string it up! ;)
     
  2. HotDan!

    HotDan! Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,237
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Location:
    Belleview, Florida
    I was referring to the (usually) cloth backed micro grits which are generally prefaced by a 'P'. At any rate...Anticipating your results...:D
     
  3. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Yeah, it p2500. Finest the bricks and mortar stores round me seem to stock.
     
  4. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Schedule for the tint:

    - Test area roughed up to P240 and a small ding ironed out. Wiped down with a tack cloth (done)
    - Sealer coat of Tru Oil (I'm doing this with a few thin coats every couple of hours rather than flooding it)
    - Wait 24 hours
    - Wet sand with Tru Oil and P400
    - Wait 24 hours
    - Wet sand again if needed and keep going once per day until flat
    - Leave 48 hours after final grain fill to make sure the tint sits on top properly
    - Mix tint and 'French polish' on in very thin coats. I'll probably need to mix extra each coat... I'll work out how I'm going to manage consistency
    - use the drying time as a guide to whether I can do a coat ever 12, 24 or 48 hours. Who knows!
    - use look and feel of the finish to dictate if/when any between-coat sanding needs to take place
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2015
  5. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    The oils seemed pretty dry except for some build up round the edge so I tried a fairly wet coat of Tru Oil on top of the white and the red. The pigment lifted where it wasn't able to soak in because the wood was too smooth - a few small spots on the red and on the knot on the white.

    The surprise winner so far though is the White. With the sunflower base, it dries faster than the linseed based paints and the Tru Oil has dried faster in the sun. If sanded slightly rougher with a grain filler (mainly to stop the white pigment collecting) it could make quite a nice white blonde.

    The red is still drying so we'll see how that's going in a bit. If anything, the Tru Oil has brought out the patchiness. If many more coats of the oils were needed, I don't see it has any advantage over stains and dyes.

    It's a warm, sunny day so these are curing outside. I should hopefully get another coat on today.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Oh yeah. The tinting... My sealer coat and grain filling dried great, so I tried mixing some Tru Oil with the red. It doesn't mix extremely well. You can see the ratios below and I used a dash of white (mineral) spirits to help it along. I think you'd need much larger quantities and a lot of mixing to get a good even consistency, which I don't want to do for a small test.

    French polishing it on didn't work... that just leaves circular streaks on top of sealer coats so had to go with the grain and wipe most of it off. It goes on so thinly you can only just see a touch of rosiness to it. But this is my mistake here - the red is a bad choice for a translucent finish I need a much darker pigment than the end colour I want. I'll see what happens after a few more coats but I don't have high hopes for this method... I'll stick with the red and see if we get a noticeable and even pink tint

    I tried the tint mix on a raw piece of wood as well (on the left in the picture) and you can see that putting it straight on to raw wood would likely lead to serious blotchiness.

    I know some people claim success with these oil methods, but I can't see an advantage to them yet. I can see a LOT of trial and error and unpredictable results. The exception is that white blonde which to my eyes looks like it has some potential for a nice finish, and one that can be difficult to do without spraying.

    Any theories on what could make the tinting work better?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015
  7. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Putting the plank out in the sun to dry, I'm able to apply new *thin* coats very soon. Which works well as, with the container lid on, my mix hasn't gone off yet :D

    The difference between coat one and coat two of the tint is quite dramatic.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015
  8. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    6 super thin coats on the tint and it's starting to even out and have a pronounced effect. I've mixed a second batch with slightly better consistency:

    - Thin the paint with white spirit (as a reminder, I'm using Windsor and Newton Cadmium Red)
    - Mix 1/3 thinned paint with 2/3 Tru Oil

    It's still a bit streaky. I'm hoping with another 6 or so coats it will begin to look more even.

    Due to the great weather today, I've managed to get three decent coats on the white panel. It's not drying so fast indoors so might have to wait until tomorrow to do anything else on that. But it's starting to look super shiny and no sign of any problems yet.

    I've not sanded anything yet... just a light brush with some steel wool here and there to knock some bits of rubbish off.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. HotDan!

    HotDan! Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,237
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Location:
    Belleview, Florida
    I'm a bit disappointed to hear that the French polishing method didn't work out. In theory it should. Perhaps it's a compatibility issue between the bases of the pigment and Tru-Oil? I'll see if I can't come up with a better answer...
     
  10. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    My mixture doesn't seem quite consistent enough. It pushed a lot of colour out to the edge of the area I was trying to polish. The Tru Oil seems to take the pigment OK, but what appears to happen are some of the elements in the mix sink to the bottom.

    Working long lines seems to give a better result as it feels easier to even out the consistencies. Perhaps I gave up to soon on the polishing... it's not a technique I've tried before.

    I would expect some other colours might work better... or worse...
     
  11. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    3,322
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    Update... still building up coats of the tint using more of a French polishing technique now... it's going on better it seems. Still, it's quite streaky due the inconsistent mix. Anyway, where the tint's concerned, it seems that Tru Oil will cure fine thinned and mixed with other stuff. If there was a way to get an even colour mix, this could be a nice technique.

    The white piece if pretty good - decided to wet sand and went through the finish on some high bits (oops). However, that aside, the finish appears to be very robust on top of the white sunflower oil-based paint. The black and red don't look great at all so I've abandoned those, especially as there are good dyes for both those colours.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.