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Oil changes

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Twofingerlou, Feb 28, 2021.

  1. rstaaf

    rstaaf Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    I am 57 and I can tell the weather by how my knees feel and I fractured an ankle in college trying to get ready for Air Force Field Training. Never really healed correctly as I stupidly tried to hide it from the detachment staff and had the cast removed early for a meeting. Doing everything I can these days to get my weight down as I feel my best at about 165-175, I have a way to go to get back there :eek:

    This is how I solve the "old bones" problem. The "bone" rides really close to the ground and even with my "Dad" physique, I can get under the Prius without having to lift it too high.
    Little helper is 22 now and in college so he doesn't "help" much with the cars anymore. Great kid, cars just aren't his thing.
    DSC00007.JPG 20170225_214715354_iOS.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2021
  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Hmm.

    I look at this completely the other way around.

    All that bending and twisting and wrenching, is part of fitness for life. If I were ever to have to get under a car by the side of the road, I like knowing I have the capability to get the task done. The flexibility and strength are something we need to keep at the ready, for as deep into life as we can go. It is just one way, I think, of fighting off senility. We can hand off all these types of tasks, if we're wheeling and dealing like Warren Buffett, but if we're all but retired, we need things like this to keep our minds and bodies conditioned.

    Getting old means pain, any way you cut it. I let it bother me less, when I keep pushing. Nothing bothers me more than taking it easy around the pool, drinking cool drinks and still having a knee trying to go out on you. IMO we're supposed to challenge our range of motion - that's the best way to avoid ossification.


    If I may, I think your better argument is, been there and done that and getting under there shall be reserved for fun projects only - and money's not that tight. Gotta spend it on something.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2021
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  3. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    I used to do all oil changes myself. However, I have become less enamored with dealing with the used oil. Used to be you could just drop it off at a variety of facilities, but the last time we tried, there was a disposal fee...I get it, they lost the profit on the labor and maybe oil recycling facilities are not as hep on used motor oil as they once were, but at the end of the day, I had (including going and getting the oil, changing the oil, getting rid of the oil, etc.) about 4 hours time in the process. And I saved about $30 over just having it done by the dealer. Or, about $8 an hour...Since I already have a relationship with said dealer...

    OTOH, I usually do my own brakes. Easy to do, and I’m not on my back under the vehicle, and the left over parts are easy to dispose of. And I get the pads and disks I want.
     
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  4. Stubee

    Stubee Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    I changed the oil in my car & truck for many years but don’t anymore. I even sold my ramps off to dissuade me further! I just got tired of it & can pay someone to do it and it ain’t as outrageous in price as some of those on here are seeing. I do enough oil changes to keep me happy with a number of smaller machines.

    I did have one of those “finger tight oil drain plug” nightmares, courtesy of my Toyota dealer. Their service manager later thanked me for noting something didn’t feel or sound right directly after the plug departed because I “saved him at least $5000” for a new motor. I’ve driven enough machines that I sensed something as I made a turn on country highways, looked at my gauges and saw my oil pressure dropping. I pulled over & shut her off, then got out to find a large stream of oil exiting my crankcase. Thus started my nightmare: hot summer weekend day 30 miles from anything & 150 miles from the dealer, eight year old grandson with me...it was no fun. The worse part was crawling under my Tundra as it lay on an oil drenched wrecker flatbed to install the new plug I bought at an auto parts store. It was Hell even to find the drain hole and ya know, I couldn’t find the filter because it was enclosed in a box!

    That truck took more oil than it’s listed capacity because every drop must have drained from every bit of the engine as it bounced on that flatbed in the summer heat. I finally got it filled, crossed my fingers and started it up. Voila, no problem! The dealer paid for my ruined clothes & more, + some free oil changes and extending the engine warranty to 100K miles etc. You’d think I’d have started doing my own changes after that, but instead I had the same dealer do it so if anything like that happened again they’d be to blame.
     
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  5. viking

    viking Friend of Leo's

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    Have you any idea how many years ago these pumps started to show up on the market ?
     
  6. Drew617

    Drew617 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, at $500/axle, brakes might be a different story for me just on principle. I assume that job is a moneymaker for small shops. Even a driveway brake job was a safer bet when I lived out west, though. Up here, it's a lot more likely to require at least a torch.
     
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  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Contaminations and moisture are a function of the type of driving you do, what quality of fuel you can get, and the type of environment you drive in. Coking of the oil appears worst in cold climates, where the motorist does lots of "mini-tasks" of 1/4 miles each and never lets the car get up to temperature or cruising speed. Here, the high end synthetics do resist breakdown better than any dino could, but if I could have a choice, between transforming the type of use the car is subjected to, or change the quality of oil, I guess I'd assign the oil quality a back seat also.

    I'm excited about electric vehicles, mostly because we've got to get the "mini-task" drivers out of their IC vehicles. Even if the electric power is from coal (yecch), for those drivers now, it would be transformational. For people like me who drive 12-600 miles or not at all, we're why gasoline powered cars exist and we can change every 12,000 miles and our refuse oil (goes into my neighbor's tractor) looks pretty darned good.
     
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  8. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

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    Curious what all the people here who still change their own oil do with the waste oil?
    Disposal is part of the cost of letting a shop do it.
    Back in the '60s-'70s when I was doing it myself I didn't think twice about dumping in a dirt field.
    These days it is well worth it to me to pay someone else to do it, especially considering how much longer between changes they recommend.
     
  9. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Folks ask me why I avoid NE cars, even when the sheet metal appears sound.

    I changed the rear brake pads sets, on 3 different Saab 9-5s, all on the same day and with plenty of time to spare. A torch? I just used brake cleaning fluid, no penetrating fluids at all. One of the benefits of staying south of road treatments for the most part.

    These cars were made in 2001, 2004 and 2006 and the rears had NEVER been off of there since the day the cars were manufactured. All at least 210,000 miles.
     
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  10. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    $110.00 is not a good deal for the consumer for an automobile oil change, even at a dealership.

    An auto oil change in a shop environment can be done in no more than 15 minutes (and that is a bit slow). On a pro rata basis, the labor cost to the consumer would be $25 on the high end. Moreover, the shops buy bulk oil far better prices than we can get at retail, so the material cost is wholesale and would be no more than 50-60% of what consumers would pay at retail.

    $110.00 is a good deal for the service provider.

    I went into a Midas in metro Atlanta last year and was shocked at the posted labor rate. I forget exactly what it was, but recall it was around $120-125.

    A lot of dealers that charge $100.00 per hour also impose a shop charge in the range of $40 per visit.
     
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  11. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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    I've wrenched on cars a bit and done plenty of my own oil changes.

    I'll happily pay 75 bucks for someone else to go underneath my car and get dirty. I also don't have to worry about disposing of any environmentally hazardous materials.

    Is my "man card" going to get revoked now? :lol:
     
  12. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    pretty much every autoparts store here accepts it without question or charge.
     
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  13. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    LOL, I was stunned when I had to drop the engine out of a Porsche I purchased when we got to Phoenix. Not one broken bolt on an old car. Difference between a snow area and the Sonoran Desert....Of course the sun damage was greater here.

    But yes, when I had a VW Touareg, the break job was pads, sensors and rotors. $1000-1200 in parts +5 hours in labor or so. So think $2K going out the door. I had to buy a special tool to take their rear rotors off, but still the first time I replaced brakes on that vehicle, I got the higher service pads I wanted, dimpled and slotted rotors and still saved like $600 in parts and another 4-600 in labor and about $100 or so in sales tax. and the job was about 3 hours of time. Of course, it helps when one already has the proper tools, air compressor, impact tools, torch (if needed) and bleeding tool. However, I acquired those tools over a lifetime, so it is hard to say if I ever really amortized them. OTOH, working on cars has been a bonding experience with me, my dad, and my son (and daughters). But the economics of a brake job are better for me than an oil change.

    It helps that I know how to do those jobs properly, as well.
     
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  14. Drew617

    Drew617 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    When I moved to Tucson, I drove there in a 1991 Civic that lived its first 10 years in northeast Ohio. A few months later I needed a tie rod. While I have a hard time believing the shop had never encountered a northern car, they reacted as though I'd driven in 2500 pounds of loose rust.

    I also owned a '72 Super Beetle while I lived there. Not restored or anything, just a fairly clean, 30 year old survivor. There were maybe 10-20 days all year that wouldn't permit valve adjustment in an uncovered apartment parking lot. I do miss that.
     
  15. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, but the hassle/time involved is worth some cash to me. In addition, there's nowhere I can work on a car living in a condo/apartment building.
     
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  16. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Afflicted

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    All I know is, as long as I throw a quart of Fender Mojo Oil in my Tele, I'm good to go for another 3000 miles.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. lammie200

    lammie200 Friend of Leo's

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    I inspect my car regularly as well as do my own brakes, springs, shocks, struts, etc. I use the pump to change my oil that's all.

    BTW, I also lost a client of mine that was crushed to death under his car. His wife and newborn found him after they returned home from an errand. And I do live in earthquake country.

    I don't hear many stories of people screwing up their cars using pumps properly. I am not scared. BTW, I should add that you can easily measure how much oil you extract versus your oil capacity. Every time that I have change my oil I have seen pretty much my maximum capacity come out. So at least as far as my vehicle and my pump goes the system works.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2021
  18. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Same here.
     
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  19. lammie200

    lammie200 Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, if you buy your oil in 5 quart containers it is pretty easy to rotate the new containers with the old ones so that you can drop the old oil off. You don't even have to wait for them to empty the container in their drum or tell you to go someplace else because their drum is full.
     
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  20. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Friend of Leo's

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    I'd rather change oil more frequently, and operate at a lower level of contamination, than extend changes with synthetics and higher levels of combustion byproducts and contaminants. I personally believe that is the greater contributor to engine wear, that actual lubricity, VI breakdown, etc. I operate my vehicles periodically for enough time to "cook" off any moisture build up, especially my idle vehicles that do mini-tasks. I know most folks don't know to do this. Oil related failures ceased to exist decades ago anyway, except for defective designs, which I only know of one in the last decade, and the worst case result, was excessive oil usage (self changing oil design, lol).

    I'm up for an electric, when the cost-benefit dictates. Not only do they incur a big financial impact, but there is a significant environmental impact of retooling the grid, charging stations, and all that new production. I just don't know that now is the right time? Seems like the technology is mature enough to field, but not efficient enough to scale up to conventional, and interchangeable. Like you said, long haul travel, and some other applications aren't favorable yet.
     
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