Oh boy.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Ironwolf, Mar 3, 2020.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    51,238
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    What do ya expect? I didn't have much to work with, and besides it was free!
     
  2. TelenTubes

    TelenTubes Tele-Holic

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    843
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2018
    Location:
    Waco, Texas
    My personal experience growing up in a fairly well-off middle class household created by a couple of baby boomers... they wanted life to be easier for my brother and me than they had it. My parents, though, did have me working a full time summer job by age 13, which I now appreciate as that work ethic has taken me places and made me appreciate college all the much more. By the time I went to college, I'd shredded paper 8 hours a day for two summers, worked as a electrician's gopher all one summer climbing in attics and under houses to fish wire, a homebuilder's gopher, toting boards and tools and shingles up and down ladders, and a hospital orderly, changing bed pans and making beds and wheeling people out to their cars.

    I grew up in a rather large house, although it was older. Lots of space. I think for many kids, not being able to immediately have that lifestyle their parents had immediately upon graduating and getting their first job is something they aren't prepared for mentally. Many have never had a single summer job, much less responsibilities at home (I was also the yard boy at home from age 11-12).

    Now, my first college apartment was probably about the same size as the house my mother and her four siblings, plus grandma and grandpa grew up in, and there were just three of us living in it.

    I have to watch it with my son, too. It's easy to spoil them if you don't start introducing some personal responsibility very early on, IMHO. Who doesn't want better for their kids than we have it?
     
    imwjl likes this.
  3. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    51,238
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    I'd rather owe it to you forever than to beat you out of it, if I owed it to you, but I don't. You answered a question that was asked of someone else! Claim jumper! :lol:
     
  4. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    51,238
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Location:
    Bakersfield
    Is this better?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. OttoCorrect

    OttoCorrect Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    553
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2018
    Location:
    USA
    I work as a maintenance tech, yet I’m a millennial.

    I’ve talked to many of my boomer friends who have confessed that they do not have many or even any of the handyman skills that I have. I even installed a toilet for a boomer aged friend of mine as he had no clue where to even start.

    These studies are interesting, but to use them simply as another jumping off point for rolling your eyes at an age group you don’t belong to is starting to feel a bit stale on this forum.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2020
  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    28,403
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    Those checkouts skeered me too, for years!

    But summer tourism made me desperate enough to try them when the stores were packed and I got the hang of it.
    Kinda like learning to drive a standard but that at least held some attraction...
     
  7. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    43,824
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    well, they are. My kids and their friends are all doing interesting stuff, getting degrees, learning trades, starting their lives. You can't believe everything you read... and a stone skipping across the ocean won't ever see the depths... get involved with some young people and you'll surely see they are a great group and will do just fine....
     
  8. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    58,399
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    As an aside, I wonder how much this survey reflects British sensibilities.

    For starters:

    Other simple fixes that respondents said they can’t accomplish alone included putting up wallpaper, draining a radiator, painting, tightening up a loose cabinet door, and fixing a loose screw.
    Wallpaper? Radiator? What century are we talking about? I've never lived in any house or apartment that had either in Canada.

    Also, from having lived in the UK (way too much wallpaper), I noticed the British have an uneasy relationship with electricity. I had a housemate who couldn't simply turn off the TV, he had to (1) switch off the TV, (2) crawl behind the TV and switch off the outlet at the wall (one of these:

    [​IMG] ) then (3) pull the plug out of the wall socket. Then every time I wanted to turn on the TV, I had to go through those steps in reverse. :confused:

    This might imply replacing a lightbulb is a more daunting task in the UK, if that is how you approach turning off a TV.

    In any case, Boomers raised millennials. If your offspring are challenged by the thought of replacing a lightbulb, you messed up.
     
    imwjl and OttoCorrect like this.
  9. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,971
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Location:
    My mom's basement.
    Young people are "going out and learning to do things and gaining life experience". Lots them are. Don't be caught with outliers or bad stories influencing you. Think of gapminder stuff if you've followed Hans Rosling. My insights are being a late age parent, decades of volunteering, leadership in an organization for kids, wife who teaches high school, and director in a firm with hundreds of young people.

    When they're not doing as they should we're really bad old farts for not coaching them or showing concern. It was life changing when a few older people showed concern for me when I was young and not on a good track. We need that same attitude and give help to the current young but most are just fine on their own.
     
    gwjensen and 39martind18 like this.
  10. JDB2

    JDB2 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    695
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2017
    Location:
    Arizona
    About 5 years ago I replaced all the bulbs in my house (incandescent and compact fluorescent) with LED bulbs. I had a couple fail right away due to defects. Since then, the only time I had to change a bulb was last week. Turns out it was an incandescent bulb hidden in a fixture that I'd overlooked in the changeover.
     
    39martind18, koen and getbent like this.
  11. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,837
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    Nubs, imwjl, gwjensen and 4 others like this.
  12. 39martind18

    39martind18 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    2,767
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Location:
    Spring TX
    Yup, and DAMNED proud of it! Thanks for the compliment and recognition of my age, experience and intelligence!:cool::cool::D Some day you might get there too!
     
  13. 39martind18

    39martind18 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Posts:
    2,767
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Location:
    Spring TX
    He's just doggin' ya!
     
    Toto'sDad likes this.
  14. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    4,490
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Location:
    Frying Pan
    We live in a GTS (google that schit) age.
     
  15. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    12,642
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Location:
    near Arnold's
    You mean based on how poorly thought-out, written and supported it was?
     
    MarkieMark likes this.
  16. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,386
    Joined:
    May 3, 2016
    Location:
    In the South
    So what? I pay a 'professional' myself these days. I'm getting too old to be doing all that s***, and I haven't worked all my life to carry on working when I retire.

    I can still change a lightbulb though :)
     
  17. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,851
    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Location:
    Eastern USA
    Honestly, I'd agree with what some other replies have alluded to, and have to say the article linked in the OP was what I would consider typical "fake news" from a stereotypical fake news site. The opinions expressed arent even intended to be factual, it is purely intended to "stir the pot" and nothing more.
    And reading the replies on that site..... I rest my case.

    Smelly article on a smelly site. Intended to divide and aggravate. Nothing more.
     
  18. smoothrecluse

    smoothrecluse Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    915
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2020
    Location:
    Panther City, TX
    My boomer dad can fix stuff, but it usually ain’t pretty. Nowadays, he usually hires out better craftsman. I was fortunate enough to have a dad that could teach me basic carpentry, auto mechanics, and how to solder and use a multimeter. A lot of my friends with single moms never got the chance, either because their moms were never taught or were just too tired. And high school at the time was so focused on getting us college ready that all shop classes were replaced with computer and business classes.

    It’s getting better now though - there’s a big push in American schools for technical education and trade certifications. At the school I teach at, for the last couple of semesters on a random half-day, the teachers pick something that usually doesn’t get taught in school - changing a tire, basic cooking, sewing, etc, and the kids sign up and attend different sessions.
     
    getbent likes this.
  19. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,837
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    With all that experience you should know by now that you shouldn't generalize. ;)
     
    Xanderbeanz and MilwMark like this.
  20. Xanderbeanz

    Xanderbeanz TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    81
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    It sounds like you were born with the good luck to not have been born (or raised) with either crippling mental health issues or a developmental/learning disorder.

    It’s wonderful that such personality-building opportunities came along for you, but it does kind of sound, whilst acknowledging that there may have been difficult times, and forgive the video game analogy, that you’ve been playing life “on easy mode.”

    I was born in ‘82, my father, we are pretty sure, is on the psychopathy spectrum, and left us with me being very young. It leaves a hole in you.

    In addition, I was bullied mercilessly and endlessly at school...bullies had plenty to pick on, and I had no psychological defense.

    I was (still am) a very sensitive individual...just born that way, and when the bullies weren’t there, I was busy failing socially, saying the wrong thing, being out of step with the world.

    I ended up feeling subhuman. I was finally diagnosed with Autism at 24 and then started to try and make sense of my life. But the damage had been done, I was in so much pain and filled with so much trauma, that I was actively suicidal for years.

    So, going out and having adventures (which I did occasionally) wasn’t really on the cards. Life became about survival against a brain that was actively trying to kill me.

    I’ve worked very hard in the past 10 or so years. Found a wonderful wife, spent £1000s on therapy to slowly put my brain back together, now work in mental health, helping others.

    I can’t relate to your story at all, and you probably can’t relate to mine, your reactions would have been different to my life’s minutiae, and your circumstances are different to anything I’ve ever experienced.

    But maybe that’s ok. Maybe although it’s impossible to relate, we simply have to accept that each other has the experiences they have, and must have good reasons for acting the way they do.

    Back to my father, I’m pretty sure he was raised in a very unhappy household, he was a product of his life experiences and I can’t blame him for not being able to love/emote.

    I guess what I’m saying is is, try not to blame the young for their limitations, some people really struggle with things that you or me would find easy.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.