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Odies Oil - anyone ever use it on a neck?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by JUSS10, Sep 10, 2020.

  1. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    So I'm in the middle of building my first guitar completely from scratch. Lots of learning and been a fun process. There is a thread on it but thought I'd ask this particular question here. I'm getting close to the point where i need to start doing a finish on the neck. Neck is walnut and I am doing some finish testing on a scrap piece with tru oil. I don't know, did a neck with true oil once and didn't love it, trying again and still not loving it, obviously its me as everyone raves about it so I must be doing something wrong. Anyway, a local wood worker friend raves about this Odies oil. Checked their site and it appears folks have used it on guitars with good results but it seems like its always talking about guitar bodies. The stuff is supposed to be fool proof and its a one coat finish. I checked out a table the local guy made and it has a nice satin finish thats smooth. I really liked the feel. Just curious if it will hold up over time with sweat and skin oils. Has anyone here messed with it? its pretty pricey so before I buy a jar, I thought I'd see what others say if they've used it it.

    here is one of the better write ups with info I found. https://zerofret.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/my-finishing-tips-and-tricks-using-odies-oil-wax-products/
     
  2. Deeve

    Deeve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I'm generally suspicious of ANYthing that is called "one-coat" and "fool-proof".
    And then when somebody tells me he's the Only guy that has this rare, flawless product, I've just gotta wonder how NObody else figured it out.

    As far as I can tell, each finishing product has pro and con factors and we sort out what we're willing to put up with, whether it's multiple thin built-up coats of lacquer that require a good compressor & clean gun; a UV Cat finish that requires access to good UV lighting system to set; hand-rubbed french with permanent fragility; Behr Latex with soap & water cleanup, but I leave brush marks :eek: or tru-oil, with many many many thin coats involved (never done this one, so I'm going w/ what I read).

    Lovely pics.
    So, buy it, apply it and report back.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
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  3. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    I agree, the website is a bit lacking but the reviews are solid, lots of general videos online of it. Just maybe not popular in the guitar world yet? That’s why I thought maybe I’d see if anyone else on here has used it.
     
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  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Do not use any wax product as a guitar finish unless directed by the guitar MANUFACTURER - then it's HIS fault!

    ALL oils and waxes - especially blends - are dirt magnets and extremely difficult to keep clean. Cleaning processes also generally turn them blotchy - OK for a piece of furniture that you don't mind an aged look on - but it's not the same look as a "relic" guitar. They also have terrible abrasion and impact resistance.

    You don't handle furniture. You DO handle a guitar, sweat on it, spill on it bang it against things, lean them with the bottom on a carpet (and every "hard wax" I've seen picks up dirt and fibers from carpet - and the problem becomes exponential with heat.

    In 50 years of finishing I've leaned to avoid all wax-containing products on guitars - and ones with gimmicky, old-timey containers and zero technical info have been the most problematic.

    I have not seen this one yet - but if I do I'll buy it and test it, like I do most other products.

    But based simply on the description, MSDS a history with the generic type I recommend NOT using it.
     
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  5. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    Well sorry to hear all the hate. I bought some and I gave it a try. I have a neck I’ve been using as a test bed for learning so I thought why not?

    this particular finish is used from everything to wood floors to conference tables to fine art to wooden counter tops. I actually went and checked out a table that a local guy made for a coffee shop that has seen daily use and has held up quite well in my opinion.

    I don’t like the idea of hard finishes that have potentially harmful chemicals or VOCs in them. Obviously that’s my own opinion and know there will be others who disagree.

    so on to this finish. Pricey stuff but I wanted it for more than guitars. I have a few tables and also like to make wooden toys for my daughter of 14 months and the fact that this is a food safe finish was a bonus.

    it’s insanely easy to use. I sanded the neck out to 800 grit. The finer you sand, the more sheen the surface will have. They recommend using a scotch brite type pad that is one grit finer than you finished sanded to. I used a “0000” synthetic pad.

    upon opening the jar you are confronted with a wonder lemon smell. The finish needs to be stirred so I did that with a popsicle stick. Also used that to apply a little on the neck. And when I say little I mean it. The stuff is like honey. I worked it in with the pad and had the neck done in about 5 minutes.

    you let it set for 45 minutes to 2 hours. At about 1hr 30min I started to buff it out. You just use a cotton terry cloth to do this. Keep buffing till you can wipe your finger across and not leave a mark. Same thing here, done in about 5 minutes.

    product can me used at that point but it is recommended to let it cure up a bit. Going to let it sit for a few days to harden before I put the hardware on the neck. 3 weeks is full cure.

    overall I love the look and feel. Really shows the grain nicely. It’s certainly not a filler so if you have porous wood and don’t want that to show you’ll need to fill those. This neck was laminated heart pine so it’s a pretty tight grain. I have a walnut neck I made that I may try with this as well at some point.

    will report back with how it turns out but so far I’m really happy.
     

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  6. lawprofs

    lawprofs NEW MEMBER!

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    Any update?
     
  7. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    Yeah actually. It worked quite well. I’ve had the guitar this neck went on finished for a while and all is well.

    few notes. It’s certainly not a hard finish. I wasn’t expecting it to be I guess but if you plan to gig a guitar with this as a finish, dont plan on it to protect the neck from dents and dings like a hard poly.

    one note on that though, my daughter knocked it over and it dented the neck pretty good (though it’s “hard” pine it’s still pine). I was able to sand the spot out, raise the grain with water, sand again and just spot recoat and it blended back in perfectly. So it’s super easy to repair.

    definitely has that raw wood finish. But it is sealed. I saw water bead up on it. I’d say it’s a good alternative to tru oil or any other oil finish. It’s pretty fool proof to apply and they have other finishes you can put over the Odies original like waxes and such if you want a higher sheen. Lots of good photos of what people use it for on their Instagram page.

    all that said, I’ve actually switched to another similar product called Osmo Polyx. I’ll start another thread on that but goes on in a similar fashion with two coats and feels a bit harder. It’s also sweat resistant which odies doesn’t claim to be. Also have a friend who’s used polyx solely on all his commercial and home use tables he builds for his business and has had great success.
     
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  8. hamerfan

    hamerfan Tele-Meister

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    If you use Truoil, you will see it gives one of the hardest oil finishes - but still a bit soft.
    He put the oils on soft plastic until they were dried. The you see the hardness with a srewdriver test.

     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
  9. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    Don’t doubt that tru oil is a harder surface. This is just much easier in my opinion and ultimately hard oil waxes are more natural and sustainable which is something I’m after.

    if there is one thing I’ve learned in the last year while diving in head first on guitar building, it’s that everyone has their way of doing things and they insist it’s the best way. Nothing wrong with that. Find something you like and works for you and keep doing it.

    just wanted to toss another finishing option out there for folks to try if they wanted something different. Also if you are in to general wood working and not just guitar building, it’s a great finish to have around as it’s child safe and works great for tables and counter tops as well.
     
  10. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Poster Extraordinaire

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    How does Odies Oil compare to Tru-Oil, hardness-wise?
     
  11. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    Can’t really compare them. Odies oil is a true oil finish with a hardwax in it. It doesn’t really “build”. You can do more than one coat and it will build some. I’ve seen a video of someone making a cutting board and finishing it with odies then rubbing car keys across and it not scratching. Not a very technical test but it does have some natural hardeners in it. They claim it adheres and hardens the wood on a molecular level. Can’t say that’s false but I’m not a scientist either.

    tru-oil is not really so much an oil as it is a varnish from my understanding. It can “build” do more coats, the harder and deeper the finish looks. I’ve heard some folks doing 10-20 coats of tru-oil.

    other than the fact that they can both me rub on finishes, that’s kind of where the comparison stops in my opinion. I’ve used both. I prefer the hardwax oil finishes over tru-oil but that my preference. I prefer the look of the hardwax oil finishes as well as the natural feel.
     
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  12. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    What the heck is "hardwax"?

    When I google it, references to wood finishing tell me very little; references to body waxing waxing tell me way more than I want to know :).

    .
     
  13. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    Here is a quote from Rubio Monocoat (another brand of hardwax-oil finish):

    Hardwax oil wood finishes are typically manufactured from a mix of one or more vegetable oils and one or more waxes; the formulation may also contain a range of additional chemicals like solvents (VOCs), drying agents and pigments for color.

    European by origin, hardwax oils have been steadily gaining popularity in the North American market.

    Hardwax oil finishes provide an aesthetically pleasing and very natural appearing finishing method without forming a “plastic” like film on the wood (which obscures the grain and texture of the wood).

    Would be curious if any of the members from outside the US are more familiar with the finish type.
     
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  14. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    That info is typical of what I've been able to find so far.

    One of the blurbs I found mentioned carnuba wax.

    Some of these "hard wax oils" seem a little hard to source in the U.S.

    I like the low voc aspect, and would like to like what is vaguely described as being "made from rapidly renewable resources".

    I am aware that products like palm oil also come under the heading of "rapidly renewable", but it's large scale production is also quite damaging to the environment in the short term.

    I see that WoodCraft is selling the Osmo stuff in small cans in matte, satin, and gloss for about $20 bucks a can.

    Maybe I should just buy a can each of the satin and gloss and see what I think of it :).

    .
     
  15. JUSS10

    JUSS10 Tele-Meister

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    the small cans go a long ways. I’d highly suggest giving it a try. If all else it’s a great finish for other wood working around the house.
     
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