Obscure albums you stumbled onto that you still love today?

Ochotona

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This masterpiece of amazing guitar boogie popped up on my radar back in '78 when I was DJing a late-night weekend show on a college FM station as a promo copy. I still have it. Bought it again a year ago as a CD so I could rip tracks onto my PC and portable MP3 player.

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When I bought the CD it was $30 and I thought that was steep - it's now $75!!!
"Caledonia" from this record is a surefire cure for depression:



I love this album. My dad had it when I was first getting into music as a young teen and the guitar playing blew my mind. I wish I would’ve bought a copy at $30 because it’s out of my price range now.
 

TomBrokaw

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Give 'em the beans!
1. My older sister introduced me to Judas Priest, around the time Turbo came out. Preteen taste being what it is, I thought it was pretty good and wanted more. So when I found a used copy of Sad Wings of Destiny, it absolutely blew my mind. But the culture of the area I grew up in, such as it was, was all about hair metal and/or country, so no one knew why I was raving about this decade old album.

2. In the early 90s, I had the great opportunity to leave my provincial little town and go to Melbourne, Australia as an exchange student. While there, Metallica came to town, and a band named Kyuss opened up for them. They were so good that I had to get their album, and that's how I discovered Blues for the Red Sun.

3. In the early 2000s, I had another great opportunity - to stop working as a mover and go back to college. My part time job at Radio Shack barely covered my bills, but I had recently gotten access to high speed internet and discovered a certain file sharing protocol that resulted in torrents of new music. One group I downloaded as an experiment and randomly clicked on a song with a funny title. That's how I discovered Venetian Snares and how aggressive electronic music could be. The song title in question isn't appropriate for a family site like TDPRI but it is about a town in Canada called Winnipeg.
 

David Barnett

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"Battle of the Field", Albion Country Band.

An all-star collection of ex-Fairfield and ex-Steeleye and future Steeleye members do a collection of electric folk songs and murder ballads, and a couple of Richard Thompson covers.

 

Maguchi

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I mean obscure, relative to you and where you were in life at the time.

And I DON'T mean obscure as in really odd, just-different-to-be-different music.

These are the top three that pop up in my head. I stumbled onto the Dave Edmunds and Kinks compilation in the late 70's, and Prine in the 90's.

I was in High School for the Kinks and Edmunds. While all my buddies were into these new bands Judas Priest and Van Halen, I was tapping into the 60's stuff; Stones, Dylan, Hendrix, Doors. And then I found these two.

On Prine, I was only aware of him mostly by name, but came home from work one afternoon in 1996 or so and the house was empty and I was beat so I dropped on the couch and turned on the TV and Austin City Limits was on, and here was this guy. Halfway into the first song I ended up sitting up, captured until the end. Love him, his history, and was glad I got to take the family to see him at the Boulder Theater. It was a bit more stripped down with only him, a bassist and one or two others, but we were in the front row.

I can still sing every song on all three of these albums off the top of my head!

Dave Edmunds - Tracks on Wax 4
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracks_on_Wax_4

The Kinks Greatest: Celluloid Heroes
https://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Kinks’_Greatest_–_Celluloid_Heroes

John Prine - Lost Dogs and Mixed Blessings
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Dogs_and_Mixed_Blessings

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https://youtu.be/0LG0YczA9Ys
Commander Cody and his Los Planet Airmen
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aging_rocker

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I don't know if this is 'obscure' in the US, given the folks who appear on it. It was written by an Englishman, apparently...

But, in the UK in the late 70s and in especially in my world at that time, this is much more than obscure. I was in a record store and I heard this track, and walked out with the album!

I still don't actually know anyone other than me that has even heard of it.

I still listen to it, and it's the ONLY 'country' album I've ever owned.

White Mansions..
 

BuckNekkid

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The benefit of living overseas (Europe) during part of one's formative years is that one gets exposed to a lot of music that often doesn't cross the Atlantic. Such is the case with The Groundhogs: Thank Christ For The Bomb. Tony McPhee had some real success in England, but that didn't translate to the U. S.

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On the domestic front, I was hooked the first time I heard the Sons of Champlin (named for Bill Champlin, who would go on to sing for Chicago). Their debut double album Loosen Up Naturally still gets a lot of play time (I also later purchased it on CD).

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Another obscure two-record set I bought is called "Word of Mouth," a "super jam" featuring Neil Merryweather, Steve Miller, Dave Mason, Barry Goldberg, Charlie Musselwhite, and Howard Roberts, as well as others.

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