Nut/String Width Between Guitars

StoneH

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I just bought a Washburn guitar for specialty use in recording (the Yairi Dread is my "go-to"). The string spacing at the nut is 1+ mm narrower on the Washburn than the Yairi. Believe it or not, that 1+ mm translates into "clumsy" fingering. I can adapt, and I will use lighter gauge strings which will likely improvement the fingering), but how about cutting a new nut that matches the Yairi string spacing? The Washburn nut looks like it has the width to move E and e out for the wider spacing. Note: The string width at the saddle is negligible.
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Killing Floor

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Play it. Get used to it. Your brain will do the work.
Gibson and Fender have different widths. So do violins and pianos.

I’m not saying you don’t notice it. I’m saying that when you regularly swap your brain will adapt and you’ll stop noticing it.

I play guitars of different manufacturers, different spacing as well as a baritone, that’s 2 spacings and 3 scales. Plus 4 and 5 string basses, 4 more scales and 3 spacings, a couple are also unlined fretless. Plus violin and both full 88 keyboard and micro keyboard. Don’t panic. It becomes normalized.
 

StoneH

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Play it. Get used to it. Your brain will do the work.
Gibson and Fender have different widths. So do violins and pianos.

I’m not saying you don’t notice it. I’m saying that when you regularly swap your brain will adapt and you’ll stop noticing it.

I play guitars of different manufacturers, different spacing as well as a baritone, that’s 2 spacings and 3 scales. Plus 4 and 5 string basses, 4 more scales and 3 spacings, a couple are also unlined fretless. Plus violin and both full 88 keyboard and micro keyboard. Don’t panic. It becomes normalized.

The brain always compensates. The extra-light strings I plan to use will help (they're really light for Nashville tuning). I'll play the Washburn as a regular guitar for a while to get use to it.

Just last year, my B string felt microns higher than my G string (it was). One pass with a nut saw, and all was right with the world.

Speaking of your brain adjusting, I rubbed a contact out while driving yesterday. It was a little disconcerting at first, but after an hour, I could read street signs and the dash. I may make it a habit.
 
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oldunc

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I dunno- I switched back and forth between a Gibson and a Fender for a while; my left hand had no trouble with it but my right hand did. Of course the width at the nut had little to do with it- I'd think that changing sspacing at the nut would take the strings out of parallel with the edges of the fretboard, which would be bad.
 




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