"Not a problem."

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Larry F, Oct 28, 2014.

  1. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I dreaded this happening.

    When I was paralyzed 8 years due to an auto-immune disorder called the Guillain-Barre Syndrome (I actually have a chronic form known as CDIP, which is easy to look up but hard to type). I recovered somewhat, but have permanent nerve damage in my legs, resulting in weakness and raging pain. The pain had been more tolerable until last year. One manifestation of nerve pain like this is difficulty with proprioception, which is the sense in our joints that indicate where our limbs are and in which direction they are pointing. This causes me to veer, list, and stumble. The really great, excellent news, which I just discovered on my own (thank you doctors for not telling me about this), is that the proprioception difficulties are tied to the amount of nerve pain. If anyone knows more about this, please let me know if I have this wrong. The upshot is that my pain is not increasing per se; it is that the medication that I take becomes less effective over time.

    The pain in my feet feels more and more like I am walking in socks on loose gravel. When I walk somewhere, I use a cane to take some of the pressure off my feet, but also to steady me when my proprioception affects my balance and awareness. It has gotten really bad in the last couple of months, and my wife can hear me whimpering, moaning, and emitting short, sharp yelps and grunts. I am still teaching, but cannot always part in a nearby disabled space. The trek from my car to the building seems really long, but in reality is probably nothing at all.

    Because of all these factors, I have started using a walker to get to the building. Once I get to my office, I switch to a cane. As many here know, I find many things in the world to be curious. Why this and not that? Here is what I have learned about using a walker on campus. When I start to head to the doors, a student behind me will rush up to open the door for me. I always say, "Hey, thanks." And they always say, "Not a problem." Of course, people use certain expressions out of habit or for the rhythm of the phrase. But from a literal standpoint, "not a problem" seems a little off. Maybe they are thrown for a loop by doing this for me, which may be something they haven't actually done before.

    Lest I sound like I am complaining, h*ll no. Holding doors is a huge help to someone in a walker. It is also a way to meet girls.
     
  2. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    "Not a problem" is most likely a reflex expression amongst a younger crowd. I would have said "sure thing" or "sure" after such a minor favor. Bigger favors would generate a "my pleasure."

    As much as I admire your obstinance in wanting to remain upright for as long as possible, there's no shame in using a chair or scooter. Despite all the tales told to the contrary, pain doesn't really build character. I understand why you wouldn't want to; I'd most likely maintain a similar attitude.
     
  3. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I nearly always say 'not a problem' or 'no problem.' Sometimes, 'you bet.'

    I acknowledge these sayings probably make no sense.
     
  4. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    Oh yeah, I forgot "you bet." Holding an already open door for someone behind me is a "you bet." I guess I never picked up on "no problem" or "not a problem" because I'm rarely around young folk. My idea of current lingo is "word up," so I've gotta be out of date.
     
  5. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It actually made something of a comeback there for awhile, not sure if its out again or not. Most often, it was just 'word.'
     
  6. Telarkaster

    Telarkaster Friend of Leo's

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    Not a problem? No worries!

     
  7. Jebrone Lames

    Jebrone Lames Banned

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    It could get worse. How about "Not a problem, know what I'm saying?"
     
  8. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    My little older coloquial is 'no prob'...make me sound mature..

    That probably emerged others spin offs, prof.
     
  9. P Thought

    P Thought Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It means "you're welcome", but it has a nuance of "don't worry about me, I didn't really bust myself up to do this" redirection to it. It occurs to me that its meaning is very much like the Spanish "de nada".
     
  10. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

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    My automatic response is "No worries." I seem to remember the phrase "not a problem" being part of my military vernacular back in the day. It may have come into more common usage as we have a large and growing segment of young veterans in the population over the last decade or two.

    Huh, interesting. I've spoken broken Spanish for 20 years now and never really thought about the literal meaning of that phrase. "It's nothing" or "of nothing" is how it would literally translate. Nifty. :cool:
     
  11. kp8

    kp8 Friend of Leo's

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    I can only handle words if they are used in a way that exactly corresponds to their stated meanings in the dictionary.

    Any idiomatic expression makes my head explode.

     
  12. Jamie Black

    Jamie Black Friend of Leo's

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    I remember being a preteen/teen in the mid to late 70's and "not a problem" was really prevalent then so I admit to being guity of using the phrase. Probably a generational thing I picked up while growing up and it stuck with me.
     
  13. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Funny, I say, "no problem" or "you bet" for 30 years or so and I have no idea where I got that. I know I say, "you're welcome" too sometimes. What is important though is that kids are still opening doors for others. Yeah!
     
  14. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I don't like it when waiters or waitresses use, "No problem," or "Not a problem."

    I know it's not a problem, because you work here and are paid to bring my food to the table.

    I prefer "You're welcome" in those settings.
     
  15. tiskit86

    tiskit86 Friend of Leo's

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    We might call that being a pedant.
     
  16. tiskit86

    tiskit86 Friend of Leo's

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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2014
  17. johnnyhit&run

    johnnyhit&run TDPRI Member

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    Generational differences

    My Dad is 93, and the reply "No problem" seems to irk him. He wonders what happened to "You're welcome."
     
  18. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    I sympathize with you on the nerve pain end of things. I have first hand family experience with nerve pain. Tough stuff indeed.
    I hold doors for anyone regardless of their differences or predicaments.
    Most say thanks. To women I reply "My pleasure" simply because it gives me pleasure to see a woman smile. To men I reply ok or yep which is simply acknowledging that I did the right thing and he responded with the right response by saying thanks.
    I read a while ago in the nearest city's paper that some women of today believe it is sexist for a man to hold a door for a woman. Those would be the ones who do not say thanks or actually scowl if you hold a door for them.
    A sad day indeed.
    "No problem" almost sounds as if they are put off by having to hold a door.
    One could read all sorts of things into that reply.
    I would consider that response as very bad manners coupled with the feigned good manners of holding a door.
    It could be simply attributed to youth. Rest assured they will change over time.
    Everyone holds doors for everyone in my wonderful nearest tiny town.
    "You're welcome" always seems a bit odd to me for some reason but then again I seem odd to me myself.
    I can understand someone trying to swap "You're welcome" out for something different.
     
  19. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    Word up.
     
  20. BBill64

    BBill64 Tele-Afflicted

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    I'd say "s'alright, dow wurry 'bout it" but that's mainly my accent.
     
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