Norm Blake's $3 million D-28

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by lewis, Aug 13, 2018.

  1. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

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    I have a Collings that I play regularly, and this guitar developed a small crack on the bridge at the end of the saddle, so I need to get the bridge replaced. I just haven't done it yet.
     
  2. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I just think it's a shame that Norman isn't getting any of that cash whatever it sells for.
     
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  3. Norris Vulcan

    Norris Vulcan Tele-Holic

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    No, no. THIS is Norman Blake:


    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I have three 12 fret dreadnaughts. They are all spectacular sounding instruments. Lap pianos. This Gallagher G-45M is really just a few serials numbers away from Doc Watson's G-50. It is one of the top 5 (or so) best sounding acoustics I have ever heard.

    But, you have to like 1 3/4” necks.

    I think most of you who do not recognize the name of Norman Blake have at least heard his playing.

    Is that guitar worth $3M? I don't know, but go find another.
     
  5. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The go find another part will be the key selling point, because it's a one of a kind guitar. To some people with enough money, it would be worth it to own a piece of music history. There was a time when something special meant more to me than it does now, but that's because I'm at the get rid of it stage in life, and not the acquiring end.
     
  6. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I remember Joe Bonamassa's dad insist I play a D-28 in his shop even though I made it clear I couldn't afford a $900 guitar. (I had $1700 in my pocket, but I was a responsible kid.)
     
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  7. jrblue

    jrblue Tele-Afflicted

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    How many people began the day saying that they really wanted a 12-fret dreadnought? I happen to like them, but it's not really the Mother Ship to begin with. I love Norman Blake. Love shadetops. But this is really mostly about the "only one" aspect, and a materialistic possessiveness that I find pretty repugnant. I had heard good things about Dying Breed, but this is not a pretty picture and is very off-putting. It's likely a great guitar, but the 3 million tag has little to do with that. You can get an astonishingly great vintage guitar for 40K, and that's ridiculous enough. Does it come with a gig bag?
     
  8. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    ^^^^But, I had never heard of Dying Breed Before this so kudos to them. Marketing/promotion can take many forms.

    Yeah, but that’s Canadian money so what’s that , about $56,000 US ?
     
  9. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Afflicted

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    ¡Bueno!

    I think it's just below the Rice/White D-28 for iconic Martin's! $3M.... I dunno....Why not! Way more mojo in THAT Martin than most other guitars.....

    I almost got to play it once! I had just started playing but knew all about Norman and THAT guitar back ~1982-5. He played a small club/coffee house and I lingered on the way out and said hi. He was just casing that guitar and I said "Oh wow there it is!" He handed it to me! I had an "I'm not worthy!" moment and slowly backed away!

    I love the "add to cart" button! :D
     
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  10. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I'm partial to that style... mine ain't 3m (yet) but, boy it sounds good and plays better.... ain't no money above the 12th fret nohow.
     
  11. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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  12. 83siennateleguy

    83siennateleguy Tele-Meister

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    What do you do with it if you could afford to buy it ?
    You certainly wouldn't use it at a gig for fear someone might steal it.
    You'd be afraid to leave home for fear someone breaks in and takes it.
    I guess you play it on the couch a while then put it in a converted gun safe till next time!
    Idk. That's just nuts !
     
  13. Digital Larry

    Digital Larry Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    Once I was at Gryphon and they had a (only) $25,000 Gibson Loar F-5 Mandolin. I said "wow". Guy said "wanna play it?" I practically ran out the door. Kinda like wearing a white shirt to the Italian restaurant. I don't normally spill food all over myself, but there we go...
     
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  14. still_fiddlin

    still_fiddlin Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Yes, it does seem a little steep, but the valuation is probably one to test the waters, and as mentioned, it's simply a rarity factor that you can't really discount, though the true value would be known by simply putting it in a well-publicized, high-end auction and see what happens when the billionaire, collector class gets involved.

    I and a couple friends got to play a couple guitars in the Martin museum that they had pegged at around $1M+ value (together). I was actually surprised that they were really nice guitars to play and listen to, but would anyone really pay that amount? Who knows...

    I'd probably take out the insurance, and loan it to Quentin Tarantino for his next movie.
     
  15. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think we all know what to say when Kyle Bush asks if he can hold it.
     
  16. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm a firm believer in 12 fret acoustics having an extra sweet timbre. I have a Taylor very similar to your Larrivee. What a well balanced range!
     
  17. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In reference to Mike Eskimo’s post at the top of page three and with no thought as to what this guitar is worth to someone who has the wherewithal and mind to own it, I will observe that anyone who gives a rat’s ass about Anyone————————-(insert name here) is dying everyday.
     
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  18. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Friend of Leo's

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    I'm a long time picker and player of flattops. Norman Blake is pretty much the icon for flatpicking, with a nod to Doc Watson. Yes, Tony Rice was the younger innovator, but without the other two, we don't know that Tony would have chosen a flattop to craft his great music. I like them all, but I really give the top spot to Norman for tune choices, early advocate of flatpicking as a distinctive art, not just fast fiddle tunes on a six string, and he was a hell of a song and tune writer. He also is just a cool dude that saw a lot of action, made artistic choices about how to live, who to play with, etc.

    In the flattop world, this guitar has several highly desirable features that only a few folks might realize have significance:

    12 fret bodies put the saddle and bracing in a different location relative to the waist and soundhole. It creates a distinctive tone across the fretboard - you either like it or not. Its not great for micing and feedback, its unparalleled for rhythm volume in an acoustic unit. It also truncates your upper fret access. But it gives back so much more in volume and voice. Taste driven choice, until you decide you want to drive a loud trio with a flattop. A proper 12 fretter is hard to beat for raw volume and voice in that context.

    Slot headstocks have more volume and a slightly different tone. They evidentally create this boost two ways. First, the string posts are supported at two places, and don't flex or give, like the cantilever of a conventional post. They also create greater break angle over the nut than a conventional string post. Slot heads were discontinued around this time in favor of the "prettier" solid heads. They cost a good bit more to produce.

    Early Martin's, like pre 1978 don't have an adjustable truss rod. There's a reason Martin resisted these for 50+ years. Again, most folks don't have the access to experience this stuff, and you have to be a geek to get there, but the solid bar truss rods in the necks definitely preserve more volume and voice. An adjustable truss rod is like a spring, where a solid bar-neck is stiffer and just livelier. 1933 was the first year of the square tube truss rod, which is better than the previous tee section truss rod. They new larger dreads probably required the square tube truss rod. But commercially non-viable now, with the insistence on adjustability of the neck for low action.

    Bar frets are louder, and don't need the same finger pressure to produce a clean clear note especially at speed, and especially if you have the guitar setup for volume with heavier strings and higher action. They are anchored better in the fretboard, and provide more mass. Think about when you play slide, a heavier slide is louder and easier to produce clear notes, than a lighter thinner one. They just provide a better boundary with less volume and sustain loss than t-frets. 1933 was the last year of the bar frets I think. Also, they cost more to install and dress.

    I agree its maybe a 300k guitar based on legacy and collectability. I also agree the generation that appreciates it and Norman, are waning. 3M is fruity, and they know it. So there's another reason for pricing it as such. Not sure what that might be.
     
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  19. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

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    I know far too many guitarists who want 14 frets and seldom use that many notes above the 12th anyway on an acoustic, but what they usually don't realize is the advantages of the 12 fret models.

    Typically, the 12 fret models look like the neck is shorter because it moves the bridge lower toward the end pin which means it sits in a meatier part of the top. If you play anything above the fifth fret the notes tend to sing out more than most 14 fret models. I love 12 fret guitars for this reason.

    As far as the guitar discussed here, I suggest listening to the video. It does not sound too boomy at all, not nearly as much as my D28S which has, indeed, a very big bottom in its sound. Also, someone mentioned the 1 3/4 width neck at the nut, and I don't have any idea what the "Norman" guitar neck width is, but my D28S has a 1 7/8 inch nut!
     
  20. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    It’s a hard pill to swallow, but just because we (Baby boomers/older Gen X)
    Value something or revere someone doesn’t mean anybody else younger than us is going to think the same way.

    And “only one that exists “ only go so far when you don’t even care about all the other ones that do.

    I would think that this is kind of a soft lob toward the Martin company and their museum. Because, not at that price, but I bet they would be first in line in seriously wanting to own it.
     
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