Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Afflicted

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    A day late and a dollar short.
     
  2. RollingBender

    RollingBender Tele-Afflicted

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    Here’s a couple from Minnesota (I’m a transplant here).

    Umina... Umina go into town tomorrow.

    Beans... Beans you’re going to town anyway, take me along.

    There are two tiny towns nearby that both end in Creek, both spelled the same way but the locals pronouns one “Creek” and the other “Crick”. Nobody has been able to explain this phenomenon to me but I assume it’s linked to the original inhabitants of the “Crick” version town being of a certain religious group sometimes known as “Mud Creekers”.
     
  3. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    My Chinese medica! professor explained to us one day that learning English was one of the hardest things he'd done, so wide is the gap between the two languages. Uncharacteristically for a Chinese teacher, he invited d us to correct any mistakes he might make, parts of the body being especially difficult for him. We mostly didnt as it's bad form, plus his versions were funnier. Things like-
    Bacteria, for the back area
    Fronteria, for the front
    Elbum, for elbow,
    Jewbone, for jawbone
    Peanut, well you can guess that one!

    Most problematic were idioms. He would take them quite literally. Cast your mid back became throw away your brain, and so on.
     
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  4. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    When a waiter says “are you still working on that?”

    Never understood that, and quite rude if you think of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
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  5. newrider1969

    newrider1969 Tele-Holic

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    In my part of central Illinois we call it skeetching


     
  6. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yes, it's the same story with herb. The English word started without an H.
     
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  7. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Jolly-O ! Pip pip !

    You hear this a lot in Ar-Kansas and it always makes me laugh
     
  8. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    As I remember it, Bees knees and cat's pajamas died of exhaustion and exposure in the fifties and since than have only been used as cute retro-isms. The sixties had things like far out and groovy, of course, and a seventies/eighties equivalent was cool beans—bandied by the came cohort that liked its opposite, tough darts.

    Then awesome came busting out of the campuses and has refused to budge despite our most valiant efforts.
     
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  9. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    Out the back?

    =O.
     
  10. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Total aside:

    There's a road in Charlottesville, VA, called "Rio Road" (pronounced "Rye-O").

    It originally was marked for the railroad stop on it--#10. R10. Locals read and said that sign as "Rio." So the authorities eventually said, "Okay, then." Rio Road it is.

    (https://www.cvillepedia.org/Rio_Road#cite_note-7)

    And in class yesterday I twice said "Whole nuther"--while hectoring the frosh to unslouch their minds.

    As much as I love helping students meet crucial standards of precision, I sure wish that I could teach Adventures of Huckleberry Finn every semester. There's math, and then there's music.

    By the way, Bill Bryson's The Mother Tongue is a very fun read. And his Made in America focuses on American English. It rocks the bees' knees, bud.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
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  11. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    They look like Mainers, they act like Mainers, they dress like Mainers, and they think like Mainers, but they sure don't talk like Mainers!
     
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  12. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    Intentional anachronism doesn't count. (And is illegal in most states.)
     
  13. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    You're probably right. I've seen movies from Northern Ireland and Jamaica that had subtitles, and I was glad they did. And movies from Scotland that I wished did.
     
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  14. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    Some Americans say it one way, some the other. I've always heard the modem thing pronounced like stouter.

    You might also have noticed that we pronounce a lot of T's like D's. So when we say router, it might sound to you like it rhymes with powder. (We hear the difference. No one else does.)
     
  15. g-Paul

    g-Paul Tele-Holic

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    "Not the sharpest knife in the drawer" = stupid.
     
  16. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    He’s so dumb he goes to the imbecilica on Sunday’s

    oh, that’s just a Catskills bit

    never mind
     
  17. KWal

    KWal Tele-Meister

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    "Deader'n s*#t (feces)" as in "The car won't start 'cause the battery's deader'n s*#t."

    "Fixin' to" or "Fittin' to" for the more countrified usually around Mississippi.


    We've got a small town Southwest of here by the name of "Rio Vista". You'd think it would be pronounced "Ree-oh" Vista. Nope. It's "Rye-oh" Vista.
    For the record, there's a whole lot of "fittin' to" that occurs there.
     
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  18. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    =O]

    In Maine we have a Vienna (rhymes with my Anna) and a Calais (rhymes with Dallas).

    My favorites:

    - In Maryland: Havre de Grace (havverdee GRACE)
    - In Bridgeport, Connecticut: Iranistan Avenue (ARN-uh-sten)
     
  19. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    Either. It depends on the part of the country you and your family are from. That is, your roots.

    And as mentioned above, most* of us don't use a T if a D will do (like between vowels or before R's and L's). So a computer router rhymes with powder:

    American T's

    --------------

    *You can see Will Smith learn to say "bottle of beer" like a rich American in Six Degrees of Separation.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
  20. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    My wife used to live in Appalachia. Her favorite: fixin' to get ready to go.

    In Maine, if it's broken:

    - it's all stove up.
    - it s--- the bed.

    (For emphasis, you can preface either one with:

    - Jeezum
    - Jeezum crow
    - Jiminy Christmas)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
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