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Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. darkwaters

    darkwaters Friend of Leo's

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    Very Godfather, as in "Jimmy the Weasel is still alive and talkin'. What are yous guys gonna do about dat ?"
     
  2. Pixie-Bob

    Pixie-Bob Tele-Meister

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    In most cases, about three inches...
     
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  3. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    Nope

    bobby-dazzler
    n noun British informal, dated an excellent person or thing.

    ORIGIN
    C19: orig. northern English dial.
     
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  4. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    One of my favorites is "slower than a 7 year itch"
     
  5. Charlie Bernstein

    Charlie Bernstein Poster Extraordinaire

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    In Kinky Friedman's Guide to Texas Etiquette, the Kinster reminds us that y'all is singular—the plural is all y'all.
     
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  6. Pixie-Bob

    Pixie-Bob Tele-Meister

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    Like so many English words, 'route' is a loan-word from French. We pronounce it the same way they do - 'root'.
     
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  7. Jerry_Mountains

    Jerry_Mountains Tele-Holic

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    :lol: I need to hang out with people my age then
     
  8. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

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    Being from Texas, especially in the Fort Worth/Dallas area, I can say that really is the way suburban life in Texas is...there’s some gentle exaggeration and polite parody, but not by much.
     
  9. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    If you could all agree to stop saying 'nitch' instead of 'niche' that would make me happy. ;)
     
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  10. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    I had college buddy from Bensonhoist, Bwooklyn, who had quite the set of plural gradients:
    • You
    • Youse
    • Youses
    • Youse guys
    • Youse guyses
    • All you ____________ers
     
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  11. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    "Bobby, if you weren't my son, I'd hug you."
     
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  12. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Afflicted

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    Both pronunciations are correct and in common use in American English. There's no general rule, but people (or at least me) seem to use "root" for the noun form of route as when describing a road or pathway, i.e. it's "Root 66" not "Rowt 66." When using the verb forms of Route "rowt" is more typical, as in I'm going to "rowt" the traffic through a detour not "root the traffic." A wifi router is 100% of the time a "rowter."

    See, it just makes sense!
     
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  13. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Afflicted

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    .
     
  14. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm still not sure whether you take the scenic root or scenic rowt?

    Other Americans seem to take the scenic rowt.
    .
     
  15. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    a rout is what you put a pickup in no? :)
     
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  16. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Afflicted

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    It's definitely the scenic root. If you take the scenic rowt you end up at a nasty strip mall. ;)
     
  17. dburns

    dburns Friend of Leo's

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    Haha...jawn is the best. I remember hearing it as far back as early elementary school (‘81/‘82) as “jimmy jawn”. And yea, it literally can be substituted for any noun.

    Another thing people still say around here is “tap Mac”...which means getting cash from an ATM machine.
     
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  18. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I've spent nearly all my life--so far--in northeast Oklahoma and southwest Missouri. Here are some idioms that I have heard.

    My dad said that some neighbors had enough kids to bait a trotline.

    He also said that an insincerely friendly guy went around smiling like an undertaker.

    I brought a tall girl home from college. He told her that if she got any taller she would fork again.

    In the Ozarks, some people say, "I don't care," to indicate their acceptance of an invitation.

    An adolescent who has become interested in persons of the opposite sex is said to have "started noticing things."

    A young man who stays out late frequently is said to be "laying out with the dry cattle." I think this means hanging out with the other people who don't go home at a proper hour and looking for opportunities for sex.

    I've heard "drunker'n Cooter Brown" in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Missouri, and "knee-walkin', commode-huggin' drunk" from a guy from Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

    Some guys who were late returning from a hunting trip said "somebody moved our truck," and had to explain to me that this was a figure of speech for admitting to having got lost.
     
  19. g-Paul

    g-Paul Tele-Holic

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    In the bathroom throwing up = "he's talking on the porcelain phone"
     
  20. mitchfinck

    mitchfinck Tele-Holic

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    As a life-long southern Ontario dweller... I haven't heard either. Doesn't mean much... but maybe it's hyper-regional.
     
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