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Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    It's funny because I would have presumed this was British slang, they are all very common phrases here, it's stuff my Dad would have said.
     
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  2. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    My stepdad was definitely NOT a rural guy. An insurance salesman and people gabber. So his equivalent to "Hold your horses" was "Hold the phone."

    The first time I heard him say that we we were building a bathroom wall. He's been a sergeant in Patton's 3rd Army and barked when he worked with his hands. So--sho' nuff--I went and held the phone. Which was, in those pre-e days, on a floor above the new bathroom.

    When he realized where I'd gone, he yelled, "Criminy, have you been smoking rope again?"
     
  3. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    It's not a bad idea to actually check if the expression you think is particular to your location is in fact so.

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/until_the_cows_come_home

    In the quotations, there are examples from the 1600s in the UK.
     
  4. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    Hold your horses is attributed to Homer (the Greek, not the Simpson)

    Till the cows come home is at least Elizabethan (the first one)

    Yonder is Middle English, probably earlier.

    :)
     
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  5. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Around here, for the last 45 or 50 years, I've heard and used "I'm going to scratch gravel and mosey" used to say "I'm leaving now".
     
  6. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Many years ago I met a young physician named Ralph Earp, which seemed redundant.
     
  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Folks that moved from Michigan, Ohio or Indiana, to Florida 1970-1999, head back up North 500 miles and try to settle in the mountains of North Georgia, SE Tennessee, Northern South Carolina and Western North Carolina......

    And they are called "Half Backs". Florida is a word you spit on the ground, in Cherokee County, NC.
     
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  8. nomadh

    nomadh Tele-Afflicted

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    Awhile back my wife used the term "dank" referring to something dark and wet and my kid told her to stop acting cool like a stoner and using lingo she doesnt know. I sort of remember hearing dank is used alot for good weed but my kid had noooo idea it was actually a real word that normal people use in everyday sentences

    We use it now any chance we get around him and laugh our asses off :)
     
  9. nomadh

    nomadh Tele-Afflicted

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    I used the term moola for money around my hispanic friends and they thought it was a hoot. I thought it might have been a spanish term but they never heard it at least in that context. Maybe it was hawaiian?
     
  10. naveed211

    naveed211 Friend of Leo's

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    Woops
     
  11. Goldenshellback

    Goldenshellback Tele-Meister

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    100% southern -is a banana samich I remember when I was in the Navy and they had bananas out on the mess deck. I grabbed one and some bread. I proceeded to apply some peanut butter one slice of bread and mayonnaise on the other. As I sliced up the banana and put it all together one of my shipmates eyes bugged out and he exclaimed what the hell are you eating. I said a banana samich.
     
  12. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    In Ireland I’d often be greeted by someone I’d bumped into with “Wrighty, is it yourself?’.
     
  13. Slowpoke

    Slowpoke Tele-Afflicted

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    During my military service I worked with two American guys and one Swedish guy for 4 years one was from Texas and the other from Alabama and they both used to say Y'all, so guess who picked it up and I still say it many years later. I get some strange looks too, then have to correct my self.. S
     
  14. Thorby Bislam

    Thorby Bislam Tele-Afflicted

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    Yous is from Glasgow/NI.
     
  15. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    And from Liverpool Scouse.

    But I've only ever heard "Youses Guys" in New York!
     
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  16. Thorby Bislam

    Thorby Bislam Tele-Afflicted

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    "Ima" contraction of "I'm going to."
    At first it irritated me but then I found out that it was a black slang. Which means when a white person says it it's cultural appropriation, not that it stops yous guys doing it. I'll stop here, that whole areas a minefield.

    Incidentally, something I've wondered. There's a whole host of black slang expressions going back to the 1920's jazzers that been adopted by whites, some making their way over here. Axe meaning guitar for one. But is there any white slang expressions that have been adopted by blacks?
     
  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    To bridge the tube/valve US/UK usage, I've decided to call them vubes. Let's see if it catches on.
     
  18. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    A lot of what us transplants to the South would call Southernisms are much shared by Southern whites and blacks in all regions of the country, as so much of "black" American English originated in and still echoes the South.

    So in that sense, yes, many "black" idioms and sayings came from whites--but vice versa, too, though of course for a long time many white Southerners resisted recognizing that. There's a lot of overlap and mutual exchange there.

    When I first moved to central Virginia, in 1984, I actually couldn't distinguish between, just by hearing them, black and white construction and maintenance workers when I'd hear them talking and teasing each other. The heavier the Southern accent in a given region, the more similar the phrasings, especially when blacks and whites are speaking across the racial tensions.

    I'm in a very Appalachian part of Virginia now. While a much smaller % of blacks live here than in central Va., since this land was tough to farm and therefore there were fewer slaves and tenant farms, an Appalachian version of the many Virginia accents again blurs the racial lines. On our softball team, a white outfielder and our black pitcher, from separate but neighboring counties, both used the phrase "Git up on toppa it, now" for "Let's intensify our effort." Curious, I asked them individually where they'd picked up that phrase. Both said, "My grandaddy."

    They also both said, "Saddle down" for settle down + get control of the situation.
     
  19. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    Yes, a minefield indeed. Even for those who seem to believe they exist on some higher ground. Cultural appropriation, huh?



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  20. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Uh-oh. I'm not a moderator, of course, but I think we just reached the thread-snip point. teletimetx, in the interest of the thread continuing, maybe you can edit your last post to euphemize that iffy bit?

    We probably also oughta leave "appropriation" alone and get back to stuff we say that our furrener friends find quirky.

    Just sayin'....
     
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