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Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    I've also come to realise that what is called a 'church' in America is not what what comes into my head when I hear the word.... which is very old and impressive architecture, maybe a grave yard, bell ringing, all in constant need of repair and lacking funds.
     
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  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    This is tricky. "Root" can mean either of two pronunciations. One were they put the solid, straight line over the oo, and another where the arched mark is placed over the oo.

    And thus my grandfather pronounced Route 256 as rhyming with Tootsie 256. A short oo as opposed to a long one. Yes, he's way in the minority.
     
  3. smoothrecluse

    smoothrecluse Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    My dad had a bunch when he was annoyed, which given my family, was most of the time.
    “Heavens to Murgatroyd!”
    “Christ on a pony!”
    “You could break a bowling ball with a wet noodle!”
     
  4. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    And we called it "Driving the Porcelain Bus".
     
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  5. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    And don't forget "Ralphing."

    My brother had a college roommate named Ralph. I thought it was just his nickname until I was there when he arrested for...ralphing on a police car, which he'd run into while clumsily "scarfing out" on a restaurant tab. When the cop looked at his ID while arresting him, he of course sighed, "Well, it figures."

    Elsewhere in the English-speaking world, does anyone hear the gems that my old shop teacher yowped at us when we'd misuse the tools?
    • "I'll flip you like a cheese omlet."
    • "I'll flip you into next Tuesday."
    • "I'll snatch you bald-headed."
    • "Sure as cruising, you're headed for a bruising."
     
  6. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    A few Australians that I once worked with always said "Praying to the Porcelain Buddha".

    And I seem to remember that they had a lot of experience doing it!
     
  7. Goldenshellback

    Goldenshellback Tele-Meister

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    I’ll lay some Southern Fried on Y’all
    How bout it. Standard greeting, translation: How are you.
    Just pitiful. Substandard, translation: Doesn’t meet standards.
    Sorry as the days long. translation, worse than just pitiful.
    Slick as grits. translation, superior.
    Fine as frog hair. translation, superior, or meticulous.
    You right. translation you are correct in your assessment
    Fixen to. translation, preparation, emanate.
    Throw down. translation. A feast, fisticuffs,
    Smack yo mamma. translation. Common reference to food that is so delectable you would smack some one to partake in the dinning delight.
    Sho-nuff. translation, a common understanding or accepted fact or truth.
    That dog won’t hunt. translation, not acceptable, substandard, person is just pitiful, or sorry as the days long.
    Won’t hit a lick with a stick. translation, person is lazy.
    Grits and gravy and I don’t mean maybe. translation. No mincing of words.
    Georgia ice cream. translation, Grits.
    ‘Shine. translation, handcrafted adult beverage and fuel tank additive.
    Jack-leg. translation. Individual who is crooked, corrupt and illegal.
    Buggered up. translation, individual who has suffered injuries due to an accident or moonshine still explosion.
    Coke. translation, any soft drink product or brand.
    Sweet Tea. translation, the official beverage of the Deep South.
    Roll Tide. translation, acknowledgement of superiority of accomplishment, performance or just a Alabama football fan.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2020
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  8. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Someone I know calls it as "Calling Ralph on the great white phone".
     
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  9. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Another meaning is "go for it".

    We're standing on the bank, waiting for one of our kayaking party to just run the big waterfall or heinous rapid, and then one of us finally "throws down" - meanwhile the rest of us are at the bottom, waiting to rescue him by whatever means, and corral any loose kayak equipment. And take pictures or video, most important of all.
     
  10. Dixon in Korea

    Dixon in Korea Tele-Meister

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    I’m American, but a regional expression I’d never heard before was “a bag of kittens.” It means sloppy, out-of-control drunk (but not in a violent way). For example, “When she got home last night, she was a bag of kittens. It took her ten minutes to open the door.”
     
  11. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    “Hit me up”
     
  12. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Katy bar the door
    or
    out in the back 40
    or
    That is in the "boondocks"
     
  13. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    Does anyone still say "cuppa Joe"?
     
  14. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like it when Peter Brady says Pork Chops and Apple Sauce in a Bogart gangster voice.
    So much so that since first hearing it I always ask for my pork chops the same way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
  15. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The internet is creating some strange anomalies.

    I was in Memphis this weekend and a guy with 0% to do with the UK was telling his friend he was "chuffed" about something. That's strictly accomplished because of social media. I didn't even know what this term meant, 15 years ago. Memphis, in case y'all have not noticed, is not Washington DC or Fort Lauderdale - we don't have appreciable numbers of UK folks there. It ain't a Cosmopolitan place and there's fewer tourists, every day.
     
  16. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    ha, that's funny.. It's something I say a lot, usually as 'chuffed to bits'

    It's interesting that this goes both ways as I think a lot of people here feel it's just Americanisms that are always becoming common here.
     
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  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I'm not half chuffed!
     
  18. stevemc

    stevemc Tele-Afflicted

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    people that move here are called washashores.
     
  19. Frankentwang

    Frankentwang TDPRI Member

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    American here. What yall got to understand is that With the size of our country, theres sooooo many different accents and each one has their own slang, I'm from the deep south and I've been told i have a very thick accent, we have a bunch of words we would use
    "Yall" I use this all the time without even knowing
    "Over yonder" means "over there"
    "Hold your horses" stop right there
    "Till the cows come home" it'll be a while
    "Ramble on" gotta go
    These are just some examples, I hear them alot where I live
     
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  20. Frankentwang

    Frankentwang TDPRI Member

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    Hear these all the time too, "Mind your own biscuits and life will be gravy"
     
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