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Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    The Canucks I know (all Southern Ontarians) call it "peameal bacon," pronouncing that "pah-meal."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peameal_bacon
    And it is pretty common in S. Ontario....
     
  2. Caleb Cull

    Caleb Cull TDPRI Member

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    "Worship".

    It just seems a little quaint and backwards. I mean, I'm baptised Catholic and was taught by nuns in primary school, but even before I realised I'd always been an atheist, the whole God thing was never framed in terms of cringing.

    Especially when for most of you guys it involves playing rock n' roll in a church, which to a European sounds quite transgressive and rebellious.
     
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  3. DHart

    DHart Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    "Dancing with the porcelain goddess."
     
  4. johnDH

    johnDH Tele-Meister

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    I lived in LA in the mid '90's, by which time 'Valley Girl' speak was.. ...like...everywhere? way beyond.. like..Sherman Oaks Galleria?..like...duh...!
    and I'm goin'.. like..wha...?
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
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  5. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Gag me with a spoon..... I love that one...:lol:
     
  6. Ivorytooth

    Ivorytooth Tele-Meister

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    Land Maggots=Sheep

    T*ts up= done got broke or died. My car went t*ts up yesterday. I am now walking to work.

    Cattle=Slow Elk

    Flatlanders=People from the valley. I lived up in the mountains and the people that came up from the Treasure Valley to our town every weekend were flatlanders.

    Sh*ttin' in tall cotton=Things are going great.

    Brown bottle flu=what people come down with the next day after a hard night of drinking beer.

    Colder than my ex wife out here=temps below zero deg F.

    Syrup Suckers=Canuckians=Canadians The nicest people in the world. I work with a lot of them and many of my friends are high stickin' syrup suckers. :) Love our neighbors to the north! They got a good sense of humor.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
  7. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I worked with a lot of southern guys for around 5yrs in the pipe coatings industry and heard a lot of expressions from them. Two I remember offhand are, "You ain't never been fishin' till you caught a mississippi catfish on a 2lb line" and another was a remark by the plant superintendant to the office manager who had just been divorced, " Alimony, the f*****g you get for the f*****g you got".
     
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  8. elpico

    elpico Tele-Afflicted

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    According to that peameal bacon is a cured, un-smoked bacon so not really the same as the smooked & cooked american "canadian bacon", but that stuff is indeed one of the internet legends I mentioned as a possible source for the name.

    Another explanation involves american soldiers going to england during wartime. In england, unlike canada, the word "bacon" really does refer to that cut of meat. Apparently supply disruptions in europe led to a lot of the pork in england being imported from Canada so the shop window would say "We have canadian bacon!" (as opposed to the non-existant european sourced bacon they had the week before).
     
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  9. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    'Sluice your gob'!!......"pah-meal"...!!! Have you actually been to Canada? LOL.....I've lived here all my life northern Ontarion, southern Ontario, B.C...travelled all across the country and I've never heard anyone pronounce peameal as "pah-meal".....maybe you've been to Canada but it sounds like you weren't hanging out with Canadians...... ;)
     
  10. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    Correct me if I'm wrong but the USA didn't exist in the 1300s, so it must be another damn Yoo-ro-peen import :)

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dead_as_a_doornail
     
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  11. g-Paul

    g-Paul Tele-Holic

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    Another Canadian-ism: "Molson muscle" for huge beer gut.
     
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  12. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    boneyguy, you perplex me!

    Well, let's see. Lived w/ and then married a St. Catharines/Toronto lass for...16 years, in total. Much of that time we were in St. Catharines, Toronto, London, Owen Sound, and a few hundred other places in Ontario. Go there whenever I can still, after our divorce. Still close to her family. I talk with Canadians, I listen, I listen some more, the English language is actually my job. So, yeah, eh?

    Why would I make this up?

    And not "pah-meal" like "pah"-pause-"meal," but as "pahmeal." Just breaking up the syllables for illustration's sake.

    Neither of us have exclusive knowledge of all Canadianisms, do we? So one of us should stop presuming to speak for all Canada, as the other was simply reporting slang and idioms he'd noticed.

    Or as my Tillsonburg-born, all-his-life-living-in-Southern-Ontario late/ex-father-in-law--who loved his peameal bacon and sluicin' his gob with Earl Grey--would say purt near everyday, "Back off and p**s up yer back, eh, friend?"
     
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  13. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Poster Extraordinaire

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    I often take that a step further and say, “He ain’t the sharpest spoon in the drawer...”

    I was going to comment on Rio Vista (I live nearby as well)...
    Also, the small town of “Joshua” (on the way to Rio Vista from Fort Worth) is pronounced as “Josh-YOU-way” by the old-timers...it’s been the typical (Biblical) pronunciation since the 1980’s, though.

    You can tell a native Texan if they can pronounce Waxahachie, Nacogdoches and Pearland properly.
     
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  14. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm perplexed as well. I've been to most of the places you've mentioned and I've not heard any of these Canadian idioms or pronunciations in my 61 years as a Canadian....so mostly that's what I'm commenting on, my consternation. I'm certainly not meaning to suggest that you are lying....that never even crossed my mind. Unlike the U.S and the U.K, Canada has pretty homogeneous dialects and accents with from B.C to Ontario...(about 4,400km or in U.S dialect 2,700 miles)..without any real noticeable accent changes. Of course there are notable exceptions beyond those regions such as the Arctic region, Quebec and Newfoundland. Idioms vary somewhat for sure regionally. But I'm stumped with the examples you've provided and so were a couple of other Canadians I've noticed.

    And I've never heard the expression "Back off and p**s up yer back, eh, friend?" before either....lol. I've been missing huge chunks of the Canadian experience it would seem.....o_O
    Again, I'm not suggesting for a second you haven't heard these idioms and pronunciations..I just think they must be extremely localized....fer sure, eh?!
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
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  15. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    'Tis your (fantastic) country, so of course I want to defer to your experience in it. I've spent collective years there, but not nearly 61 of them, because 80% of my 58 years have been spent in the US of A.

    Even so, your country is linguistically more diverse than you may suspect, as most (biiiiig!) countries are. I knew a Newfie who'd moved to Ontario when he was about 18 who still had a bigtime Newfie accent, and lots of sayings I wish I could remember. The lifetime Ontario family and their friends from whom I heard several of the Canadianisms that puzzled you and a few other Canucks on here had been tobacco and dairy farmers from around Tilsonburg. They had been sent to St. Catharines and Toronto for war industry work, as they'd been so handy fixing farm equipment that the gov't. deemed them best used there instead of in uniform proper. But they retained very rural accents and idioms, as did many of the people they worked with who raised (big) families in the Niagara Peninsula and TO regions. So some of these idioms may be localized to/originate from the Tilsonburg/just north of Lake Erie area of olde.

    Even so, I have heard several of their sayings from strangers several hundred miles north, east, and west of the Tilsonburg/St. Catharines part of Ontario. On a train north of Sault Ste. Marie I heard two gents playing poker tell each other to "p*** up yer back." Either the idioms or the people or both dispersed, or have been spottily common.

    So it does happen--quirky sayings in our otherwise familiar country that we've never heard ourselves, but do get said. Thinking of this, and my son traveling with me having been asking about idioms, I kept big ears going while stopping for gas in a rural store in a county on the North Carolina/Virginia line, about 50 miles from my home just a week or so ago.

    Sure enough, I heard two I'd never heard before in the span of 15 minutes. The first was "You're just greenin' me," for "You're assuming I'm gullible enough to believe so obvious a misstatement."

    The second was "He squozed it [a spout] too hard," meaning that he had squeezed the spout too flat to let oil flow well.

    I've been in Virginia for 36 years, and in this region of it for 26, but had never heard either phrase.

    Then again, my ex-brother-in-law, who lives just outside Toronto, recently told me he was "cheesed off" about something. That's not unique to Ontario, of course, but the last time I heard that in the States was about 1974, in Buffalo, in the cross-border verbal crosswinds. Have you heard "keener" or "eavestrough" up there? I never did, but apparently they're said. (The first one sounds like something the McKenzie brothers would say, the second like a Trudeauism.)

    I have had a few fellow Americans ask me, when they found out I lived in and go to Canada, "Do they have as many names for snow as the Eskimos do?" A Canadian Customs agent at the Peace Bridge told me that a few times a year, new visitors peer beyond the border booth and ask, "So where's the snow?" In July, or August.

    By the way, thanks for being less crazy than many other places on earth, and for Neil Young.
     
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  16. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I always heard it, "Praying to the porcelain goddess."
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    We ate at this "Italian" place someplace back East. The waiting was very long and the food wasn't very good and I was basically trying to keep the bill from being overly large since the experience was already a write-off by then. Btw I don't think anyone of genuine Italian heritage worked there.

    And they wanted to turn over this table, since for God Knows what reason this place was popular. And the waiter's assistant is trying to wrestle the plate away from me and says "are you still working on that?". And I told him "Actually yes, but it is hard work - I may need more time".

    This got back to the waiter's ear and the then suddenly concerned waiter came to check on us. And he comped the wine. Which was, paradoxically, the only worthwhile thing they had.

    +

    This is one of the reasons we put up with so much pain and uncertainty in New Orleans. By comparison, much of the highly praised food on the east and west coasts is pedestrian in comparison. And the middle part of the USA, huh.
     
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  18. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Normally "Bless your heart" isn't meant as highly condemnatory. The most common use I see, it is "dismissive". The speaker is saying "I'm haven't got the time for that or him, right now".

    It certainly isn't interchangeable with cursing someone out. Or, I don't think it is.
     
  19. Uncle Daddy

    Uncle Daddy Tele-Afflicted

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    The Aussie rising question tried to take off here in the UK, but users tended to end up bound and gagged in the boot of a car. It's more than a little irritating.

    I've noticed something similar but reversed in the American teacher voice.

     
  20. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I hear you.

    Friedman could be right about Texas, but the use of y'all, y'alls and all y'alls goes like this, further east.

    There's 25 people at a party, and you're talking to two and three more are looking on. When X invites "y'all" to go fishing tomorrow morning, he's inviting just the two. When X invites "y'alls" to join in the footrace tomorrow morning, he means anyone who is listening. And when X gets very angry at everyone at the party he says "all y'alls" can go to the Dickens.
     
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