1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Non-Americans: What American slang do you find funniest/weirdest/most charming?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RoscoeElegante, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,291
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Location:
    TooFarFromCanada
    Naggy reminder that we gotta keep this family-style. So just the clean(er) stuff, please.

    Just wondering about this, as I have lots of international students this semester. Beyond their usual understandable struggle with American slang, it's interesting to see what slang they intuitively get and which ones they find most amusing.

    FWIW, to nod to other cultures' stuff, the Canadian "sluice your gob" is a fam favorite here.

    The Spanish "Throw the house out the window" for hosting a wild party is great.

    And where would we all be without the British "codswallop"?
     
    P Thought and ping-ping-clicka like this.
  2. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,600
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    “See you in a minute!”

    Three hours later... still nothing.
     
  3. Art VanDelay

    Art VanDelay Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,209
    Joined:
    May 20, 2018
    Location:
    Arcata
    "There's more than one way to skin a cat"

    So true.....
     
    Deathray likes this.
  4. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    1,727
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2019
    Location:
    Moncton, NB Canada
    @RoscoeElegante Canadian here - have never heard that and have no idea what it means. Also I don't ride a moose or have a pet beaver ;)
     
  5. suave eddie

    suave eddie Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Location:
    Department of redundancy department
    Sluice your gob?
    Another Canadian here (although only lived here 12 years now) and have never heard that one. Googling it tells me it is from colonial times.
     
    boneyguy and black_doug like this.
  6. darkwaters

    darkwaters Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,199
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2012
    Location:
    Newfoundland
    Nope. Doesn't ring any bells with me either and I'm a Newfoundlander and we've got a million of'em.

    The only American one I can think of is "Y'all". Sometimes I find it endearing and sometimes I find it a bit intimidating.
     
    Charlie Bernstein likes this.
  7. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,944
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    The confusing thing is that in this context it means to fool or trick, as in...

     
    Telecastoff1 likes this.
  8. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    12,784
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2003
    Location:
    Netherlands
    ha ha! we gotta keep it clean...

    if I put on an American movie over here - especially action/police/detective, just about every other word is a "bad word". People in Holland use the word F--- and the word S--- freely, because they know from American movies that these words are common.

    It all rubs me the wrong way. Those words are common and I use them regularly too, but I never understand why they are so important in American movies. They do not add much - certainly not when they are repeated over and over again. The story would go on just fine without all the "real street talk". It was cute 30 or 40 years ago. Now it's just distressingly stupid.
     
  9. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,600
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    Yeah those Dutch curse a lot!
     
  10. Jerry_Mountains

    Jerry_Mountains Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    519
    Joined:
    May 10, 2014
    Location:
    The City of Mountains, Old Mexico
    I like when someone says that something cool or fancy is "the cat's pajamas" or "the bee's knees" haha that's amusing and I've been using it a lot lately.
     
    LKB3rd, 8barlouie, EsquireBoy and 4 others like this.
  11. RoCkstAr256

    RoCkstAr256 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    30
    Posts:
    2,023
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Location:
    Poland
    Sledge Hammered - frikking drunk lol
     
  12. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,291
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Location:
    TooFarFromCanada
    Ex-wife #1 (from southern Ontario) & her family and friends all said it. Heard it elsewhere in Ontario, too.

    Some of the slang almost transferred. In Buffalo, we called grabbing onto a back bumper on a snowy road and getting a free ride "pogeying." Across the border, if you were "on the pogey," that meant you were lazing aboot on unemployment benefits.
     
  13. Rowdyman

    Rowdyman Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    415
    Joined:
    May 17, 2013
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    Roscoe, what in the heck is, "
    ??

    It sounds gross. lol, regards, RM
     
    GuitarKid and Fretting out like this.
  14. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,291
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Location:
    TooFarFromCanada
    "Sluice your gob" means to take a hearty drink.
     
    mkdaws32 likes this.
  15. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,962
    Joined:
    May 3, 2016
    Location:
    In the South
    Jaysus, it gets more and more like Quora every bloody day in here. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Rowdyman

    Rowdyman Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    415
    Joined:
    May 17, 2013
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    Ha ha!!
     
  17. Rowdyman

    Rowdyman Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    415
    Joined:
    May 17, 2013
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    FWIW, when we were kids,, grabbing onto a car or bus bumper and getting dragged down the road, (in snow, of course), was referred to as , "bonking". lol RM
     
  18. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,291
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Location:
    TooFarFromCanada
    A MinnysOOta pal (yah, their accents are a bit CanAYdianish, in parts) uses "Now we're loggin'" for when a dilemma or problem--in effect, a logjam--has been resolved.

    A very Virginia babysitter, my daughters' de facto grandma, had some good ones:

    "Bound for the swampoodle." = On a downward spiral, bound for the swamp puddle part of town or the worthless farmland.

    "You're so ugly [cranky] the Devil's jealous."

    "He'll be doin' a stony lonesome 'fore long." = He's headed for a night in jail.

    "Fair to middlin', but no thank you, that." = I'm feeling okay, + a pun on not wanting "middling," which was a cheap cut of bacon that's actually similar to Canadian bacon.
     
  19. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    4,463
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Wash your mouth out, over here.

    Shut thi gob, mind thi gob, wash thi gob out and a smack in't gob are everyday phrases here in Yorkshire.
     
  20. Jackroadkill

    Jackroadkill Tele-Holic

    Age:
    41
    Posts:
    503
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2019
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    There's a guy I watch on Youtube who's from Alberta, and uses the word "cattywampus" (spelling guessed at, here) when something's not quite right, or is a mess, or out of alignment. I love that.

    As far as US slang goes, "older than dirt" is pretty good.
     
    Honest Charley and Deathray like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.