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Nitro finishing question about coat glossiness etc. (pics included)

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by SunShadsCrash1990, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. SunShadsCrash1990

    SunShadsCrash1990 TDPRI Member

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    So im getting to the end of finishing the neck and body of my telecaster build. Near the end i started using a tip that atomizes the spray really well and started using it for every coat. Specifically im using the Red and Black WIDE JetFan tips. They look exactly like the Medium Black and Yellow JetFan tips with the only difference being the color. I was using the Black and Yellow Medium tips but the Wide Jetfan tips put out a much more even spray. Anways my question is about the coats and how they look and feel after spraying.

    I noticed that sometimes i get a coat that feels more textured. Like a very minimal orange peel. And other times or in certain spots ill get a completely smooth spot that already looks and feels glossy/smooth as soon as it drys to the touch. Obviously getting the coats to come out very smooth and glossy is what we are aiming for. But if i do get a very slight rougher spot that will still buff out im sure. But what i want to know is if the rougher spots could be caused by me spraying from too far away?

    The really glossy spots are in places where i know i was spraying closer. For example on the top of the horn where i had to bend weird in the cramped quarters that is my barn to get to the right horn. I feel like ive been spraying at about 12 inches to 14 inchs or more in most spots and on the hard spots about 8 to 10 inches. Most of the time i unintentionally spray a little too far away and have to remind myself to get a little closer. I know there are a lot of factors in play here so its not as simple as saying it will be better or worse if im closer or further. I guess what i really want to know is if you experience this (some spots are smooth/glossy while others are more rough like orange peel) with your Nitro finishes and when it does go on a little rougher in some areas do you try and get it smoother with another coat or do you just say "eh, no big deal ill buff it out when its cured for a couple weeks".

    I just did what i think will be my last coats for the neck and body and a good majority came out smooth this time but there are still some spots that are bit rougher. Like in between the first few frets its that minor orange peel feel and the rest of the frets are all really glossy and feel like they've already been buffed out. If it wasnt for the uneven spots where the light reflects off it differently it looks like it wouldnt even need to be buffed/polished (but of course im going to level sand it anyways to get a nice level glossy finish).

    The pictures below are of a rougher spot on the left shoulder and a glossy/smooth spot on the horn.


    Rough-Orange Peel spot on Tele Forum Pic TDPRI.jpg Glossy Spot on Tele Forum pic TDPRI.jpg
     
  2. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    Are you spraying with a rattle can? Where your coat looks grainy, or "pebbly", it looks to me like your coats are very thin and dry. In other words, so thin that the lacquer is basically starting to dry as it hits the body. Where you have good gloss, it looks like your coat thickness is much more appropriate. I've had this exact effect happen when I was spraying lacquer over acrylic and was purposefully spraying multiple dry coats to seal over the acrylic to avoid causing the acrylic softening up and interacting with the lacquer.

    How many passes are you making per "coat"? Most people will recommend 3 light passes per coat. I've had really good results with 2 heavier passes per coat. In any event your goal is to get enough lacquer on your work piece so that it can level before it dries. Retarder and thinner are a big part of the recipe for that, which is why I'm asking what you are using to spray.
     
  3. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    I start out spraying light coats and after I have some paint build up I go really heavy to where it looks like I would not have to sand.

    I think you might be going the opposite way. If you are using Nitro try shooting a really heavy coat (not runny) and see if it will melt your rough spots into the finish.
     
  4. SunShadsCrash1990

    SunShadsCrash1990 TDPRI Member

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    That is exactly what i was thinking. It seems like the heavier coats (not so heavy it runs ofcourse) come out a lot smoother. Thanks for the reply brother!
     
  5. Drak

    Drak Tele-Holic

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    The shot of the horn side looks normal.
    All that other 'pebbly' stuff, would not be OK with me.
    Once you get enough build to take time out and do a level/flat sand...
    All coats from there forward should look glossy and smooth.
    You could shoot coat after coat after coat and they will all look smooth and glossy from the point of the level sand forward.

    PS, are you heating the cans first?
    I don't shoot aerosols but from what I've read all aerosols should be pre-heated in warm water for best spray effect.
     
  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is one of the reasons I like to spray my guitars flat on their back or top - I can lay on a wet coat without the danger of sags or runs. I'm careful on the vertical sides but then are getting two coats for every one on the top or back. I reduce my lacquer maybe 10 or 20 percent depending on temperature.

    I'm also not too worried about each coat being perfectly smooth and flat - the first are intended to level and build thickness, the final coats (the clear) bring out the gloss, What I see in your pictures I would level sand before shooting the clear.

    After 6 coats of color


    IMG_3366.JPG

    10 or 12 of clear, wet sand to 2000

    IMG_3390.JPG

    buff. I'll wait a couple of weeks before putting it all together and buff again,

    IMG_3393.JPG
     
  7. NC E30

    NC E30 TDPRI Member

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    You will have to do a good bit of block sanding to get that smooth. The good thing is that it is a solid color, and lacquer is very forgiving, so if you sand through, it will be easy to blend where you patch. Typically you would spray the first coat a little dry so that the later heavier coats will be less likely to run. It's a fine art to get enough paint to be smooth, but not too much to start a run. As someone above said, laying it flat will help make that much easier.

    Once you sand and buff it, it will look great and no-one will ever know how much orange peel it had.
     
  8. nickmsmith

    nickmsmith Tele-Meister

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    I would sand that down, and spray more clear on it until it's smooth-ish. Then wetsand until it's glassy smooth, then polish. it Just make sure you don't sand through the color coat.

    This is definitely fixable.

    Home refinishing is time consuming, and frustrating for sure.
     
  9. SunShadsCrash1990

    SunShadsCrash1990 TDPRI Member

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    That was the EXACT problem. I took the "more light coats is better than a few heavy coats" saying too seriously lol. But after doing another couple "heavier" coats everything leveled out nicely. Now the neck is completely glossy and the body is 90% glossy with the only spots that arent being in between the horn and the neck pocket sides. So tomorrow im going to do one more coat and focus on those areas. I have just enough clear for one more good coat on the body but if it ends up now being enough ill happily just get another can now that i know exactly how to fit the problem. As to your question i was literally doing one pass per coat! And now that im doing about 2 or 3 in one spot its coming out better. But i didnt see your comment earlier so i was kinda worried i was overdoing it lol. But considering the results and your comment now i know thats the way to do it. Luckily lacquer is very forgiving!! Its funny cause every coat i was putting on a little more and feeling guilty like i was doing something wrong lol. But the results were getting better so i kept adding more and getting a little closer. Im not going so heavy I get runs but im spraying a little closer and doing multiple passes per coat. Basically making sure i can see a nice glossy coat over every area. Anyways thanks for your reply. You were absolutely correct!
     
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  10. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    Glad things took a turn for the better!
     
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