Nitro base coat product white shellac?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by rolloman, Oct 24, 2018.

  1. rolloman

    rolloman Tele-Holic

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    I have no white nitro primer. I am changing my guitar body from a black to vintage white (more creamy than white). Both nitro paint. Can the below white shellac I already have be used between them to get a white surface in order to get a better spray over color for the vintage white? Is this even necessary? My goal is to keep the vintage white as light in shade as I can without the black affecting it.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Zinsser...1-vapD1UtKKOeb21v9YaAkQNEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2018
  2. lumberjim

    lumberjim TDPRI Member

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    That link took me to some parts trays. I'm gonna say they won't work as a primer no matter how thin you slice them.
     
  3. rolloman

    rolloman Tele-Holic

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  4. rolloman

    rolloman Tele-Holic

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    Dang I heard shellac would work under lacquer? I will probably just spray a test patch of vintage white right over the surf green and see if it darkens the vintage white any. If so possibly just a quick coat of white primer, sealer, then vintage white, and finish off with my clear coats. Unless someone has a better idea I could try. Maybe I am worrying for nothing. Lol
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2018
  5. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted

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    Sounds like you are not removing the black nitro but wanting to just coat overtop? If so, while shellac is ok under nitro, if the current finish is nitro, you don't want to use any primer that will seal the nitro from "breathing".

    If it were me I would just go with nitro paint over the current finish and follow with clear. If you are worried about the black showing thru too much put a layer of gray before your white to transition it. Follow by clear.

    Eric
     
  6. rolloman

    rolloman Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, just the ability to cover is all. I'm beginning to think it will without any white or grey. I will do a little test patch soon as I get the vintage white paint just to see. Thanks though. It is good to know about the breathing and that the white shellac would work if needed. As far as breathing goes I am sure the nitro sanding sealer let's breathing occur even though called a sealer?
     
  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    You need to sand the black with 180-220 dry sandpaper to create some "tooth". Pigmented shellac primers adhere fine to lacquer but NOT to glossy surfaces of any kind.

    How are you applying your lacquer coats, and have you already sprayed a practice piece with the primer, white and clear coats - and buffed it out? If not I'd stop and do the ENTIRE process on some scrap wood before working on the guitar body. Learn how the products work, refine your spray technique, make mistakes and fix them and work out buffing procedures and time on something that is NOT your guitar.

    Both primer & lacquer coats s/b sprayed in 3 very light passes (so light they don't completely cover.). If you get full hide out of a single coat of primer you have probably applied too heavily and will end up with trapped solvents. Two "coats" - six very light passes - of primer are the minimum I suggest if you don't have a lot of spray experience. If it takes three coats that's fine - too thin is less of a problem than too thick.

    When you get to the clear coats the last coat or two can be "flood" coats that lay on smoothly with a nice, even gloss. Practice this - it eliminates unnecessary wet sanding and you can usually buff the next day. The only lacquer sanding should be to fix minor runs (you NEVER surface sand between coats of lacquer!)
     
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  8. rolloman

    rolloman Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the advice about getting the black first to a non-glossed sanded coat first. The rest is all good stuff too, but I already have done several guitars from the bare wood stage, but never any starting from an already painted stage.
     
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