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Nitro and orange peel

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Wodja, Oct 26, 2020.

  1. Wodja

    Wodja TDPRI Member

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    54370151-5583-484F-ABC8-E606C6F4C897.jpeg 54370151-5583-484F-ABC8-E606C6F4C897.jpeg 6BEE9414-CE5A-487B-8038-B8A8625BBB2E.jpeg Hi, so I am new to this forum and finishing guitars, I have a HH Tele body stained with red and black dye which I have then sprayed with nitro ( Mohawk rattle can). I have learnt a lot along the way about vinyl sealer, humidity etc. I’m really happy with the result and am now at the ‘leave it alone for a couple of weeks’ stage. The last coat went slightly orange peel and I’d like to sand and buff/polish that out. The finish has sunk into the grain in places and there are slight ridges Along the grain much like a relic finish. There is 3 coats of sealer and 10 of nitro. I really like the effect but I’m worried about getting compound stuck in the crevices (I did this to a les Paul and have grain gummed up with carnuba wax ). Any recommendations on giving it a final sand a polish without leaving residue behind gratefully received. Not looking for super shiny.
     
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  2. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I love that color, nice job.
    To answer you question, I’d mask up the openings and use a spray bottle and water and sand it down to about 1000-1200 grit so you can hand polish it making sure to be careful around the openings not to get any compound in it.
    Also be very careful not to sand through the clear, 10 coats is plenty if you are very careful when your using the heavier grits not to sand through.
    If you do the worst that can happen is you’ll have to spray more clear.
    Be careful, go slow and you’ll be fine.
     
  3. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    I would carefully sand the surface with something like 280.. that will knock down the orange peal. and reduce the eventual grain pattern developing in the film. It also will make polishing much easier when ya get to that stage.. Then apply however many coats you feel comfortable with, but at least three to give the wet lacquer enough time to completely melt into the existing finish.

    r
     
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  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    I divide finish sanding into two stages. While I am building the film thickness which might involve runs, sags, orange peel, dust, lint, and other irregularities I sand between sets of three coats to 320 dry. What I am trying to do is get the surface perfectly flat. Once I am satisfied with that I wet sand starting at 800 and go to 2000, what I am trying to do is get all of the scratches out. After that I buff.

    What I see in your pictures is enough orange peel that I would still be in the 320 stage. Level sand (carefully) and shoot three more coats. If the orange peel is gone, wet sand.

    Nice color by the way
     
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  5. Wodja

    Wodja TDPRI Member

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    Thank you for the compliments and the advice, all gratefully received.

    cheers
     
  6. Mistahbrock

    Mistahbrock TDPRI Member

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    I use 320 with water, its rather easy to polish afterwards
     
  7. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Orange peel is almost always gun settings or gun speed. Gun settings is often air pressure at the gun too low to atomize appropriate for the viscosity of your mix. Practice makes perfect.
     
  8. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    Welcome to the forum Wodja,

    Beautiful colors on your dye job!

    Avoiding orange peel is dancing on a thin line IME. You need enough retarder and laying down heavy enough wet coats to get a good enough flow out, BUT without runs and sags. I've never tried this with rattle cans, but I imagine it's challenging. The best I've found for me is to hit the rims first (not too heavy) and then spray either the top or back laying horizontal for a good flow out. The nice thing about nitro is you can come back and lay down another wet coat as soon as the first has set up enough.

    "The finish has sunk into the grain in places and there are slight ridges Along the grain much like a relic finish"- this tells me you have to be really careful sanding or you'll sand through and you don't want to mess with that beautiful coloring job (been there, done that).

    If you want a flat, buffable surface, then I agree with others here: a light sanding with 320 on a cork block, just enough to knock down the worst of the orange peel, then a lot more coats. I'm guessing at least 5 more before attempting a level sand. Even then you may have to live with an occasional dimple here and there, but you've got a really nice earthy feel going there.

    Looking Great! Post again as you get farther along -TP
     
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