Nice....Furnace quit.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by dented, Dec 26, 2017.

  1. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Sounds like it could be a limit switch or flue sensor wonky?
     
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  2. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Thanks for the help and offer to help. Appreciate it.
     
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  3. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Thanks for all your help.
     
  4. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Honeywell makes something of a generic control board--I've used a couple and found them to be well documented and reasonably straight forward to set up. Check the existing control board and see who made it, then check the online compatibility charts. They seem to run about $110 or so.

    https://forwardthinking.honeywell.c...tion/univ_integrated_furnace/sell/63_9426.pdf

    Edit: Looks like American Standard or White Rodgers make Trane boards.
     
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  5. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Exactly what was used. As I looked at my insurance for the house all appliances including the furnace were covered.

    Two very nice techs brought over a generic board and had it installed in about 45 minutes. The new one has diagnostic lights on it with a code book.
    No cost out of pocket for me. I would have been hard pressed to change out the board by reading and understanding the schematics and book. It took one guy to read it and the other guy to preform the wire changes with stripping and adding connectors of different shapes and sizes. Glad I called them. Still I'm glad I tried a bunch of things first. They never back tracked on my info and went right for the board. I have heat now! Yay!
     
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  6. Joe Sailor

    Joe Sailor Tele-Afflicted

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    I love it when the good guys win!
     
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  7. Justjammin

    Justjammin Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I had a similar issue a few years back, it was the startup capacitor for the blower,
     
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  8. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    No heat sucks .
    On another note along these lines , earlier this evening I happened to look out a front window to see a police officer gazing in with his flashlight . He walked around to the side door where I met him . He asked if I had noticed a water main break . Needless to say I was confused at first . He then told me that a local fire chief had reported water in the street which he had linked to a water break , thus the visit . I told him that I have a holding tank for condensate that I pump out when it fills . I pump it into the street . He then asked if it was approved by code . I won't go any further with this because this has the potential to become very stupid going forward . I have been doing this with the knowledge of water and sewer for the last 15 years . It just may end up being a bit entertaining in the end . Condensation is a byproduct of combustion and the drain pipes in my cellar are old ductile iron . I have no desire to disturb them , so I simply collect this byproduct in a 225 gallon tank and pump it out as needed . A very simple solution to what could be a very expensive issue if an attempt to plumb into that ductile iron is tried . Should they choose to get stupid about it , I will pump it up into an upstairs drain . Point being that this is free water that is supplied by the air and has nothing to do with the fresh water supply or sanitary sewer . It is essentially distilled albeit slightly , and I mean slightly acidic from the combustion . The heat source is natural gas . My guess is that this will become the next issue du jour for me with the local control freaks . Since many , if not most , furnace installations are below the drain levels this condensate is universally pumped up to the drain level for removal . I must assume that it is not typical to simply allow it to drain onto the cellar floor .
     
  9. Georox

    Georox Friend of Leo's

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    Makes a great ice skating rink in the street this time of year I'll bet.
     
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  10. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    That would be my thought at this time of year in Pa,

    My condensing furnace drains into a regular condensate pump, same one the AC drains into in the summer. Little plastic box about 1/2 gallon, when the float switch rises enough, the pump runs and drains thru the AC condensate drain pipe. I increased the diameter of the exit pipe to 1", as in exceptionally cold weather (we do occasionally get some down here), the original small diameter tube would ice up and clog the drain. It just drains onto the ground, sloping away from the house. In the summer sometimes we collect it for watering plants.


    Seems that would be a win-win for you and the local authorities-you'd have the convenience of automatic draining without having to monitor your tank level, and take time to pump, plus, the frequent, small amounts would probably be overlooked by the gendarmes, or at least not be as attention-getting as a 200+ gallon puddle in the street.

    My first condensing furnace came with a neutralizing cartridge for condensate water, as the nat gas condensate is slightly acidic. But the installation tech said it's not all that active or strong, and in my application, the plastic and stainless steel condensate pump aren't fazed a bit by it. For old cast-iron, though, you might want to neutralize. The cartridge just runs the water through some small chunks of limestone.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
  11. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    As far as acidity goes, the condo building where I worked had installed four condensing boilers. They obviously didn't read the installation instructions and piped all the condensate drains in copper. One year later they'd all been eaten through. This brought about the realization that the cast iron drain cup where they terminated was being eaten up as well and we installed a neutralizing tank.

    Hopefully, anyone draining condensate from furnaces and boilers is doing it into plastic pipe of some variation...or neutralizing in some manner.
     
  12. GuitarPix

    GuitarPix Tele-Meister

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    My furnace went out a couple of weeks ago - wound up calling for help, repair guy starts the usual checks and then very quickly showed me the problem, big black scorch marks on the back of the controller board. The replacement he had was missing the connectors - he spent most of 5 hours trying to get it to work. Another tech came by the next day with a complete setup and had it running in 20 minutes. Must be nice to have affordable boards - the one they have here is $500 CAN.

    But they kindly put me on a 'maintenance plan' which cost me $180 out of pocket and $24 a month for the next couple of years. That's quite a bit, yes, but the techs pointed out a future issue that will cost easily what I'll pay on the plan and they do yearly free checks and cover up to $1500 in fixes (but only $500 for the first month) - so my out of pocket was signup fee and an hour of the techs time, they didn't charge me for all the hours the first guy put in.

    At least the 'smart valve' for the gas didn't die at the same time, which apparently happens quite often. That would have been another $700 hit. At that point - I'd have gotten a new furnace.

    It's also a 15 year old mid-high efficiency furnace and apparently that's about their life expectancy. I'm tempted to go back to a low efficiency, 'easy to fix and lasts for a lot longer' kind of furnace.

    On the other hand, I was lucky the temperature outside was just above freezing so it wasn't too hard to keep the place livable-ish for a few days. This week we're at -22 to -25 C (-8 ish F)
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
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