NGD: Monoprice Indio Classic - Review

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
I recently bought a Monoprice Indio Classic T-style guitar for the amazing price of $63 with taxes and discounts. Shipping was free. This is a pretty impressive guitar given the extremely low price point. It easily comparable to the Squier Bullet or Affinity but is about half the price if you catch it on a sale.

Out of the Box Experience

It was shipped in a single box, no double boxing here. Fortunately, the Fed Ex warehouse field hockey team didn't use it in one of their games so it arrived in good shape.

The included gig bag that the guitar was shipped inside was surprisingly good. It's very well padded and has a decent feel to it. I've seen similar bags selling for around $30 on Amazon and EBay. It's a lot better than the thin vinyl bags I've gotten with other cheap guitars.

After removing the additional packing material, I immediately noticed one significant issue, rough fret ends. This would make the guitar hard to play. I'd be concerned about recommending one of these to a beginning player who didn't have a "tech friend" because of this.

The frets were also kind of scratchy and gritty, in need of polishing. I guess they cut out this step at the factory to reduce the price.

The factory strings had a bit of corrosion on them, enough to blacken fingers when playing.

The setup was pretty good with the intonation being good with the exception of the G which was just slightly off. The action was a little on the high side of normal.

The tuners felt a bit stiff.

The Body

The basswood body feels nice and solid with the whole guitar weighing in at about 7.6 pounds. The body thickness is 1 3/4". The red semi-sparkle finish is well done with no major flaws. There was tiny scuff, about 1/8", at the neck pocket.

Pickguard holes and spacing seem like they would a standard Tele pickguard OK. I pulled a few Tele pickguards out of my parts bin and they see to line up correctly. The pickguard is 3 ply, all white (not my favorite).

I looked under the pickguard and the routing is for a Tele single coil. So, no quick and easy mod to a HB or P90 in the neck position.

Unlike the photo on the Monoprice site the body is drilled for string-thru.

The Neck, Nut and Frets

At the nut the width is 42mm with 51.5mm at the 12th fret. The frets are 2.3mm and seem about the same as typical modern Fender Tele specs. The neck shape has a typical "Modern C" feel to it.

The rosewood was quite dry and needed oil.

The neck relief was pretty much straight as measured with my notched straight edge. I'll have to see how it settles in over time, especially since the stock strings were 9's and I replaced them with 10's.

The fret rocker found a few slightly uneven frets above the 12th fret on the bass side. Basically, nothing to worry about with typical playing. There was no fret buzz that I encountered. The action is slightly on the high side of normal which I'm OK with since it makes slide playing easier. I suspect it could be lowered a bit without causing any issues.

As I mentioned, the frets were very rough out of the box. I took some time to smooth the edges and polished the frets which helped a lot.

The plastic nut was cut well and measurements indicated that the slots were at the right height. There's not an immediate need to fix or replace it as I've found on some other cheap guitars (looking at you Epiphone).

The headstock shape is a bit odd. It almost makes me want to overlay it with a eagle sticker, provided I could find one that fit.

Tuners

The tuners are pretty typical low end sealed tuners that you'll find on many lower end guitars. They were a bit stiff out of the box. After I had the strings off, I used my power screwdriver and tuner attachment to spin them a bit. This seems to have lubricated them and they felt smoother afterwards.

I wouldn't consider replacing them a priority thing at this point although I may swap them out eventually with higher ratio ones or locking ones, depending on if I run across a good deal on some.

Bridge and Other Hardware

The photo on the Monoprice site showed a 3 steel barrel top loading bridge. The actual bridge is 6 saddle, string thru-body. This is similar to, but not exactly alike, the bridges on the Squier Affinity and Fender Player series. It does not look like you could easily replace this bridge with a traditional Tele "ashtray" style bridge without some significant mods, probably including drilling and routing.

The strap buttons are mushroom shape instead of the more typical fluted shape. This should help them hold onto a strap better.

The knobs tighten with a set screw instead of being press on. I like this little touch.

Electronics

The electronics are typical low end mini-pots and PCB switch. The pots measure within standard specs. The soldering work looks good.

Replacing it with upgraded parts will most likely require a new control plate as well since the holes are for the smaller pots. On the bright side, the depth and width of the control cavity should be able to handle the larger parts (unlike some cheap guitars).

If/When I swap out pickups, I may consider also doing the electronics at the same time, going with a 4 way switch and other improvements.

Pickups

The ceramic pickups measure out to the specs on the Monoprice site, 6.8K (B), 6.4K (N). The bridge pickup sounds decent enough, similar to what I've heard from Bullet and Affinity Squiers. However, I found the neck pickup to sound muffled and overly bassy.

The pickups, especially the neck pickup, are probably the area I'll upgrade at some point. I'll give them a little while to grow on me though.

Pluses and Minuses

+ Overall build quality
+ Good quality gig bag
+ Decent, although low end, hardware
+ Good finish
+ Level frets

- Rough fret edges
- Gritty, unpolished, frets
- Disappointing neck pickup
- Not an ideal platform for heavy modding work

Obligatory Photo

20220821_134209.jpg
 

notme

Tele-Meister
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Posts
144
Location
Kamloops BC Canada
Your review is consistent with others, the top loader/string through is a lottery...or box of chocolates. I guess it depends on the supply of bridges at the factory at certain manufacturing times. Mine (blue) has the same bridge, and sitting beside my MIM i noticed the bridge pickup is on less of an angle, i think yours is too. I think this might be why mine has less twang then my mim counterpart.
But for the price, can we really complain? Ive seen worse guitars!
 

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
Mine (blue) has the same bridge, and sitting beside my MIM i noticed the bridge pickup is on less of an angle, i think yours is too.

I've seen this on other Chinese T styles, including SX. As I mentioned, it makes bridge replacement more difficult.
 

Wound_Up

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Posts
1,256
Age
41
Location
Shreveport, LA
Man that's a huge difference from my Indio 66 DLX Pluses. But we're talking opposite ends of the spectrum: their lowest price guitar vs their highest price guitar, the 66 DLX Plus that, gets set up by a luthier at their company in Cali before being shipped to the customer. It's quite clear whoever did my guitars knew what they were doing because they're fantastic and were like this right out of the box. Literally set up so well, I didn't even want to change strings when I got the first one because I didn't want to inadvertently change something about the setup lol.

Like I said, both were flawless. Fret ends rounded off. Frets level. Daddario strings. Etc. In almost 2 years, I've done nothing but put strings on them. Awesome guitars right out of the box.

I've had my eye on the Retro Classic for quite a while and figured it'd be pretty rough at such a low price. I've seen them on sale as low at $79 or $89 at times. I still might pick up the higher end model they sell since they offer it in blonde with the black pickguard now. Before this year, it was only available in that color combo in the low class Classic model.


My two Indio 66 DLX Pluses...and my 15w Monoprice Stage Right combo lol

20220421_164532.jpg
 
Last edited:

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
I've had my eye on the Retro Classic for quite a while and figured it'd be pretty rough at such a low price. I've seen them on sale as low at $79 or $89 at times

I had been looking at them a while and resisting the impulse to buy yet another cheap guitar. But, I gave in when the price tag (before tax) landed under $60.

The only thing that was really rough was the fret ends and that took about an hour or so to correct.
 

Wound_Up

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Posts
1,256
Age
41
Location
Shreveport, LA
I had been looking at them a while and resisting the impulse to buy yet another cheap guitar. But, I gave in when the price tag (before tax) landed under $60.

The only thing that was really rough was the fret ends and that took about an hour or so to correct.

Yea? How's it sound? I might have to really pick one up. I've got a fret end file just for that.

Oh yea I guess mine two did have 1 issue.

Gritty frets. Man that bugged me! I finally just got my burst polished up so you can't feel em anymore. Thank God. That's probably my biggest guitar pet peeve. I can't stand scratchy frets. I had tried polishing then a few times and they were always still scratchy when I got done so I picked up a few different things to try a couple of weeks ago and finally got em slick. Man, those guitars are sooooo nice.
 

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
Yea? How's it sound? I might have to really pick one up. I've got a fret end file just for that.

Oh yea I guess mine two did have 1 issue.

Gritty frets. Man that bugged me! I finally just got my burst polished up so you can't feel em anymore. Thank God. That's probably my biggest guitar pet peeve. I can't stand scratchy frets. I had tried polishing then a few times and they were always still scratchy when I got done so I picked up a few different things to try a couple of weeks ago and finally got em slick. Man, those guitars are sooooo nice.

It sounds pretty good, considering the low end ceramic pickups. They're as good as stock SX or Squier Bullet pickups. They aren't as good as the ones in my kit Tele (Tone Hatch ShinKickers). Since the Indio has a neck profile I like better than the kit, I may swap these guitars' pickups and electronics (4 way switch in the kit).

After I took care of the fret ends I polished the frets using Music Nomad FRine polish and used a 3000 grit auto polishing cloth. That got rid of the gritty feel.
 

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
The board looks nice and dark and smooth. Better than most cheap imports. Is that just the picture or is that in line with your experience?

I've found the rosewood and rosewood-ish imports to be highly variable. I guess it's basically whatever is on the production line on a particular run.
 

1 21 gigawatts

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Posts
1,383
Age
48
Location
Florida
Scratchy frets are to be expected with inexpensive guitars. I checked out the latest Bullets and Affinities last week, and both had scratchy frets.

Nothing that 0000 steel wool and 30 minutes can't take care of. A polishing wheel and jewelers rouge makes quick work of it and does a beautiful job.
 

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
I have a Squire classic vibe Tele neck . Will it fit the Indio body or would it not even be worth it

It's probably one of those things you would have to try because there's a been variations in both lines over the years, the Indio more than the Squier. Typically, parts from different manufacturers that are specifically built as replacements don't fit together as well as one might like.
 

schmee

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Posts
21,867
Location
northwest
The board looks nice and dark and smooth. Better than most cheap imports. Is that just the picture or is that in line with your experience?
Mine is dark and uniform. I'm not convinced it's rosewood actually, but it's a thick slab and seems to work fine. Not oily like rosewood.... kinda dry, but smooth enough it doesn't bother. It does appear to be actual wood of some sort.
I used my usual Dremel + cotton wheel and '3M Finesse It' to make the frets shine in seconds.

I got brass bridge segments from Amazon that fit fine.
 

bgmacaw

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 11, 2006
Posts
11,055
Location
Near Athens GA USA
I'm not convinced it's rosewood actually, but it's a thick slab and seems to work fine.

It looks like rosewood to me, comparing it vs other guitars I have with various simulated rosewood and real rosewood. I may have to do a photo comparison just for the fun of it though, comparing it to guitars from every decade since the 60's.
 

Paca G51

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2012
Posts
20
Location
california
Well, I ordered a Indio Tele from their site and with code discount and free shipping plus tax was $85 ! For that price it will be one to experiment with 😉
 

Volcanicash01

Tele-Meister
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
Posts
130
Age
79
Location
Mayenne France.
I recently bought a Monoprice Indio Classic T-style guitar for the amazing price of $63 with taxes and discounts. Shipping was free. This is a pretty impressive guitar given the extremely low price point. It easily comparable to the Squier Bullet or Affinity but is about half the price if you catch it on a sale.

Out of the Box Experience

It was shipped in a single box, no double boxing here. Fortunately, the Fed Ex warehouse field hockey team didn't use it in one of their games so it arrived in good shape.

The included gig bag that the guitar was shipped inside was surprisingly good. It's very well padded and has a decent feel to it. I've seen similar bags selling for around $30 on Amazon and EBay. It's a lot better than the thin vinyl bags I've gotten with other cheap guitars.

After removing the additional packing material, I immediately noticed one significant issue, rough fret ends. This would make the guitar hard to play. I'd be concerned about recommending one of these to a beginning player who didn't have a "tech friend" because of this.

The frets were also kind of scratchy and gritty, in need of polishing. I guess they cut out this step at the factory to reduce the price.

The factory strings had a bit of corrosion on them, enough to blacken fingers when playing.

The setup was pretty good with the intonation being good with the exception of the G which was just slightly off. The action was a little on the high side of normal.

The tuners felt a bit stiff.

The Body

The basswood body feels nice and solid with the whole guitar weighing in at about 7.6 pounds. The body thickness is 1 3/4". The red semi-sparkle finish is well done with no major flaws. There was tiny scuff, about 1/8", at the neck pocket.

Pickguard holes and spacing seem like they would a standard Tele pickguard OK. I pulled a few Tele pickguards out of my parts bin and they see to line up correctly. The pickguard is 3 ply, all white (not my favorite).

I looked under the pickguard and the routing is for a Tele single coil. So, no quick and easy mod to a HB or P90 in the neck position.

Unlike the photo on the Monoprice site the body is drilled for string-thru.

The Neck, Nut and Frets

At the nut the width is 42mm with 51.5mm at the 12th fret. The frets are 2.3mm and seem about the same as typical modern Fender Tele specs. The neck shape has a typical "Modern C" feel to it.

The rosewood was quite dry and needed oil.

The neck relief was pretty much straight as measured with my notched straight edge. I'll have to see how it settles in over time, especially since the stock strings were 9's and I replaced them with 10's.

The fret rocker found a few slightly uneven frets above the 12th fret on the bass side. Basically, nothing to worry about with typical playing. There was no fret buzz that I encountered. The action is slightly on the high side of normal which I'm OK with since it makes slide playing easier. I suspect it could be lowered a bit without causing any issues.

As I mentioned, the frets were very rough out of the box. I took some time to smooth the edges and polished the frets which helped a lot.

The plastic nut was cut well and measurements indicated that the slots were at the right height. There's not an immediate need to fix or replace it as I've found on some other cheap guitars (looking at you Epiphone).

The headstock shape is a bit odd. It almost makes me want to overlay it with a eagle sticker, provided I could find one that fit.

Tuners

The tuners are pretty typical low end sealed tuners that you'll find on many lower end guitars. They were a bit stiff out of the box. After I had the strings off, I used my power screwdriver and tuner attachment to spin them a bit. This seems to have lubricated them and they felt smoother afterwards.

I wouldn't consider replacing them a priority thing at this point although I may swap them out eventually with higher ratio ones or locking ones, depending on if I run across a good deal on some.

Bridge and Other Hardware

The photo on the Monoprice site showed a 3 steel barrel top loading bridge. The actual bridge is 6 saddle, string thru-body. This is similar to, but not exactly alike, the bridges on the Squier Affinity and Fender Player series. It does not look like you could easily replace this bridge with a traditional Tele "ashtray" style bridge without some significant mods, probably including drilling and routing.

The strap buttons are mushroom shape instead of the more typical fluted shape. This should help them hold onto a strap better.

The knobs tighten with a set screw instead of being press on. I like this little touch.

Electronics

The electronics are typical low end mini-pots and PCB switch. The pots measure within standard specs. The soldering work looks good.

Replacing it with upgraded parts will most likely require a new control plate as well since the holes are for the smaller pots. On the bright side, the depth and width of the control cavity should be able to handle the larger parts (unlike some cheap guitars).

If/When I swap out pickups, I may consider also doing the electronics at the same time, going with a 4 way switch and other improvements.

Pickups

The ceramic pickups measure out to the specs on the Monoprice site, 6.8K (B), 6.4K (N). The bridge pickup sounds decent enough, similar to what I've heard from Bullet and Affinity Squiers. However, I found the neck pickup to sound muffled and overly bassy.

The pickups, especially the neck pickup, are probably the area I'll upgrade at some point. I'll give them a little while to grow on me though.

Pluses and Minuses

+ Overall build quality
+ Good quality gig bag
+ Decent, although low end, hardware
+ Good finish
+ Level frets

- Rough fret edges
- Gritty, unpolished, frets
- Disappointing neck pickup
- Not an ideal platform for heavy modding work

Obligatory Photo

View attachment 1019806
I once bought a T style guitar with Fender American Series on the tag. I never had to do anything to it! It plays perfectly. My dog loves it too!
 

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sendin52

NEW MEMBER!
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Posts
2
Age
65
Location
Sebastopol, California
I have two Monoprice guitars now: a Cali Classic HSS and a Jamm 4-string Bass. I set up the 6 string in gold which was fun and I am totally happy with these guitars. Really difficult to beat for the $.
 

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Volcanicash01

Tele-Meister
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
Posts
130
Age
79
Location
Mayenne France.
I recently bought a Monoprice Indio Classic T-style guitar for the amazing price of $63 with taxes and discounts. Shipping was free. This is a pretty impressive guitar given the extremely low price point. It easily comparable to the Squier Bullet or Affinity but is about half the price if you catch it on a sale.

Out of the Box Experience

It was shipped in a single box, no double boxing here. Fortunately, the Fed Ex warehouse field hockey team didn't use it in one of their games so it arrived in good shape.

The included gig bag that the guitar was shipped inside was surprisingly good. It's very well padded and has a decent feel to it. I've seen similar bags selling for around $30 on Amazon and EBay. It's a lot better than the thin vinyl bags I've gotten with other cheap guitars.

After removing the additional packing material, I immediately noticed one significant issue, rough fret ends. This would make the guitar hard to play. I'd be concerned about recommending one of these to a beginning player who didn't have a "tech friend" because of this.

The frets were also kind of scratchy and gritty, in need of polishing. I guess they cut out this step at the factory to reduce the price.

The factory strings had a bit of corrosion on them, enough to blacken fingers when playing.

The setup was pretty good with the intonation being good with the exception of the G which was just slightly off. The action was a little on the high side of normal.

The tuners felt a bit stiff.

The Body

The basswood body feels nice and solid with the whole guitar weighing in at about 7.6 pounds. The body thickness is 1 3/4". The red semi-sparkle finish is well done with no major flaws. There was tiny scuff, about 1/8", at the neck pocket.

Pickguard holes and spacing seem like they would a standard Tele pickguard OK. I pulled a few Tele pickguards out of my parts bin and they see to line up correctly. The pickguard is 3 ply, all white (not my favorite).

I looked under the pickguard and the routing is for a Tele single coil. So, no quick and easy mod to a HB or P90 in the neck position.

Unlike the photo on the Monoprice site the body is drilled for string-thru.

The Neck, Nut and Frets

At the nut the width is 42mm with 51.5mm at the 12th fret. The frets are 2.3mm and seem about the same as typical modern Fender Tele specs. The neck shape has a typical "Modern C" feel to it.

The rosewood was quite dry and needed oil.

The neck relief was pretty much straight as measured with my notched straight edge. I'll have to see how it settles in over time, especially since the stock strings were 9's and I replaced them with 10's.

The fret rocker found a few slightly uneven frets above the 12th fret on the bass side. Basically, nothing to worry about with typical playing. There was no fret buzz that I encountered. The action is slightly on the high side of normal which I'm OK with since it makes slide playing easier. I suspect it could be lowered a bit without causing any issues.

As I mentioned, the frets were very rough out of the box. I took some time to smooth the edges and polished the frets which helped a lot.

The plastic nut was cut well and measurements indicated that the slots were at the right height. There's not an immediate need to fix or replace it as I've found on some other cheap guitars (looking at you Epiphone).

The headstock shape is a bit odd. It almost makes me want to overlay it with a eagle sticker, provided I could find one that fit.

Tuners

The tuners are pretty typical low end sealed tuners that you'll find on many lower end guitars. They were a bit stiff out of the box. After I had the strings off, I used my power screwdriver and tuner attachment to spin them a bit. This seems to have lubricated them and they felt smoother afterwards.

I wouldn't consider replacing them a priority thing at this point although I may swap them out eventually with higher ratio ones or locking ones, depending on if I run across a good deal on some.

Bridge and Other Hardware

The photo on the Monoprice site showed a 3 steel barrel top loading bridge. The actual bridge is 6 saddle, string thru-body. This is similar to, but not exactly alike, the bridges on the Squier Affinity and Fender Player series. It does not look like you could easily replace this bridge with a traditional Tele "ashtray" style bridge without some significant mods, probably including drilling and routing.

The strap buttons are mushroom shape instead of the more typical fluted shape. This should help them hold onto a strap better.

The knobs tighten with a set screw instead of being press on. I like this little touch.

Electronics

The electronics are typical low end mini-pots and PCB switch. The pots measure within standard specs. The soldering work looks good.

Replacing it with upgraded parts will most likely require a new control plate as well since the holes are for the smaller pots. On the bright side, the depth and width of the control cavity should be able to handle the larger parts (unlike some cheap guitars).

If/When I swap out pickups, I may consider also doing the electronics at the same time, going with a 4 way switch and other improvements.

Pickups

The ceramic pickups measure out to the specs on the Monoprice site, 6.8K (B), 6.4K (N). The bridge pickup sounds decent enough, similar to what I've heard from Bullet and Affinity Squiers. However, I found the neck pickup to sound muffled and overly bassy.

The pickups, especially the neck pickup, are probably the area I'll upgrade at some point. I'll give them a little while to grow on me though.

Pluses and Minuses

+ Overall build quality
+ Good quality gig bag
+ Decent, although low end, hardware
+ Good finish
+ Level frets

- Rough fret edges
- Gritty, unpolished, frets
- Disappointing neck pickup
- Not an ideal platform for heavy modding work

Obligatory Photo

View attachment 1019806
Sounds like a bit of a nightmare to me. The only cheapo guitar I ever bought, 2 years ago, was a Harley Benton Les Paul “copy,” but to my surprise, it is a beauty! Looks and plays great straight out of the cardboard box. Very light. Great Roswell pickups. Perfect fret job with no sharp ends. Is this rare, or was I just lucky? As good as my Les Pauls anyday.
 

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Call Me Al

Tele-Holic
Joined
Dec 10, 2020
Posts
587
Age
42
Location
Ithaca, NY
Great review! Thx for posting!

I’ve considered the Strat but concerned the body would be too light. I like a nice balance and some meat to it so it doesn’t feel too cheap. This gives me hope!

And I totally agree about recommending these for beginners. It seems best for someone with skills (or a friend with skills) to assess and adjust. I’ve heard of people getting really good specimens but I think your chances of needing work are greatly increased.
 




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