NGD - It followed me home (Hollow body content)

SomeGuyNamedRob

Tele-Meister
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Posts
420
Age
45
Location
Ottawa, Canada
Ibanez AF95, Translucent Black over flamed sycamore.
Serial number dates it as having been made in May of 2008.
AF95.jpg

Even came with a decent hardshell case.
 

Sparky2

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Posts
5,048
Age
62
Location
Harvest, Alabama
Okay.
Long story.


Many years ago.
I'd been lusting for a semi-hollow or hollow-body jazz-style guitar for many months.

There are some songs, admit it, that just cry out for that kind of tone.
CCR stuff, some Neil Young, a lot of blues songs, they beg for some George Benson goodness.

I had been in and out of guitar shops for months, handling the Gibson ES335, the Epiphone Dot, and a variety of Gretsch models.
Some hollow-bodies, and some semi-hollow bodies.
All of them lovely and very expensive.

I fell in love with a Gibson ES339 (crazy expensive) and the Gibson ES Les Paul. At one point, I nearly ordered a Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin II. I had the credit card number in there, and was this close to pulling the trigger on it, when I had to pause and ask myself.....

“Man, what are you doing? You have plenty of guitars, and you REALLY need to save your money for home improvement projects this year.”

And so I gave up on the notion, and went about my life.

And then one day, the siren-song of Guitar Center beckoned me as I drove home from my cardio swim at The Natatorium.

I am weak, I admit it.
And I was weak that day.

I parked, walked in, and went directly to the wall of a hundred guitars.
I drooled over a variety of axes that I can never afford, and then I stumbled in a daze over to the wall that held old-school gear.
(Used guitars, normally sold on consignment.)

And there she was.
The blue beastie.
A dirty, dusty, gunked-up, cruddy Ibanez Artcore AF75.
She was battle-scarred, finger-printed, and dinged-up.
At least 12 years old.
She had a very dated, absurd lightning bolt logo on the headstock.
All her chrome metal bits were corroded.
The strings were poorly mounted, and at least five years old.
She was butt-ugly.

But something about her spoke to me.
I lifted her off the wall, and asked one of the young dudes if I could plug her in.

He brought me a cable, and sat me down next to a Line 6 amp with very simple features and a really nice variety of tones.

Sure enough.
The blue beastie sang like a guitar worth at least six times her stated value. ($199 was on the sale tag.)
She was dirty and beat-up, and her electrical connections and volume/tone pots needed some contact cleaner and some TLC, but I am pretty sure that she was built for me. She had just gone thru a few owners before she finally found me.

So we rang her up, and into the Subaru she went.
I hit a few potholes coming down Capshaw Road, and don’t you know that blue girl twanged a vintage Beatles chord at me?

Long story short, I spent five hours that afternoon tearing the old girl apart.
Setting the intonation, cleaning, scrubbing the rosewood fingerboard, polishing, smoothing the frets, chrome-polishing the bridge, spritzing the jack and the pots with electrical contact cleaner, mounting a new strap button on the back, re-stringing, tuning up, waxing her up with Turtle Wax, and finally plugging her into the Crate Telluride amplifier.

I tell you what.
The Blue Beastie had found her home.
For awhile, anyway.

She had an impressive tone and a great feel.
She smelled kind of old, and will only shine up but so good. She was road-worn.
But, whenever I brought her to a gig, everyone in the band wanted to play her.
It was the only guitar that gave us the right tones for Collective Soul's song Shine.
We gigged with it for three seasons.

After our band’s drummer Bob died of cancer a few years ago, I began corresponding with Bob’s brother Mark, who lived in Oregon.

Mark is a guitar player who never managed to play live on stage with his brother Bob.
The timing just never worked out.

I mailed the blue beastie to Mark, because his brother had played many gigs behind that guitar.

Mark Fillman has that guitar now, and it has found its forever home.

:)

(Me and the blue beastie, back in the day)
xibanez,P20AF75_v_1428881406.JPG.pagespeed.ic.BoLSEvegw2.jpg
 

SomeGuyNamedRob

Tele-Meister
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Posts
420
Age
45
Location
Ottawa, Canada
That's an amazing story.


Okay.
Long story.


Many years ago.
I'd been lusting for a semi-hollow or hollow-body jazz-style guitar for many months.

There are some songs, admit it, that just cry out for that kind of tone.
CCR stuff, some Neil Young, a lot of blues songs, they beg for some George Benson goodness.

I had been in and out of guitar shops for months, handling the Gibson ES335, the Epiphone Dot, and a variety of Gretsch models.
Some hollow-bodies, and some semi-hollow bodies.
All of them lovely and very expensive.

I fell in love with a Gibson ES339 (crazy expensive) and the Gibson ES Les Paul. At one point, I nearly ordered a Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin II. I had the credit card number in there, and was this close to pulling the trigger on it, when I had to pause and ask myself.....

“Man, what are you doing? You have plenty of guitars, and you REALLY need to save your money for home improvement projects this year.”

And so I gave up on the notion, and went about my life.

And then one day, the siren-song of Guitar Center beckoned me as I drove home from my cardio swim at The Natatorium.

I am weak, I admit it.
And I was weak that day.

I parked, walked in, and went directly to the wall of a hundred guitars.
I drooled over a variety of axes that I can never afford, and then I stumbled in a daze over to the wall that held old-school gear.
(Used guitars, normally sold on consignment.)

And there she was.
The blue beastie.
A dirty, dusty, gunked-up, cruddy Ibanez Artcore AF75.
She was battle-scarred, finger-printed, and dinged-up.
At least 12 years old.
She had a very dated, absurd lightning bolt logo on the headstock.
All her chrome metal bits were corroded.
The strings were poorly mounted, and at least five years old.
She was butt-ugly.

But something about her spoke to me.
I lifted her off the wall, and asked one of the young dudes if I could plug her in.

He brought me a cable, and sat me down next to a Line 6 amp with very simple features and a really nice variety of tones.

Sure enough.
The blue beastie sang like a guitar worth at least six times her stated value. ($199 was on the sale tag.)
She was dirty and beat-up, and her electrical connections and volume/tone pots needed some contact cleaner and some TLC, but I am pretty sure that she was built for me. She had just gone thru a few owners before she finally found me.

So we rang her up, and into the Subaru she went.
I hit a few potholes coming down Capshaw Road, and don’t you know that blue girl twanged a vintage Beatles chord at me?

Long story short, I spent five hours that afternoon tearing the old girl apart.
Setting the intonation, cleaning, scrubbing the rosewood fingerboard, polishing, smoothing the frets, chrome-polishing the bridge, spritzing the jack and the pots with electrical contact cleaner, mounting a new strap button on the back, re-stringing, tuning up, waxing her up with Turtle Wax, and finally plugging her into the Crate Telluride amplifier.

I tell you what.
The Blue Beastie had found her home.
For awhile, anyway.

She had an impressive tone and a great feel.
She smelled kind of old, and will only shine up but so good. She was road-worn.
But, whenever I brought her to a gig, everyone in the band wanted to play her.
It was the only guitar that gave us the right tones for Collective Soul's song Shine.
We gigged with it for three seasons.

After our band’s drummer Bob died of cancer a few years ago, I began corresponding with Bob’s brother Mark, who lived in Oregon.

Mark is a guitar player who never managed to play live on stage with his brother Bob.
The timing just never worked out.

I mailed the blue beastie to Mark, because his brother had played many gigs behind that guitar.

Mark Fillman has that guitar now, and it has found its forever home.

:)

(Me and the blue beastie, back in the day)
xibanez,P20AF75_v_1428881406.JPG.pagespeed.ic.BoLSEvegw2.jpg
 

Recce

Poster Extraordinaire
Gold Supporter
Joined
May 3, 2016
Posts
5,169
Location
Northern Alabama
Okay.
Long story.


Many years ago.
I'd been lusting for a semi-hollow or hollow-body jazz-style guitar for many months.

There are some songs, admit it, that just cry out for that kind of tone.
CCR stuff, some Neil Young, a lot of blues songs, they beg for some George Benson goodness.

I had been in and out of guitar shops for months, handling the Gibson ES335, the Epiphone Dot, and a variety of Gretsch models.
Some hollow-bodies, and some semi-hollow bodies.
All of them lovely and very expensive.

I fell in love with a Gibson ES339 (crazy expensive) and the Gibson ES Les Paul. At one point, I nearly ordered a Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin II. I had the credit card number in there, and was this close to pulling the trigger on it, when I had to pause and ask myself.....

“Man, what are you doing? You have plenty of guitars, and you REALLY need to save your money for home improvement projects this year.”

And so I gave up on the notion, and went about my life.

And then one day, the siren-song of Guitar Center beckoned me as I drove home from my cardio swim at The Natatorium.

I am weak, I admit it.
And I was weak that day.

I parked, walked in, and went directly to the wall of a hundred guitars.
I drooled over a variety of axes that I can never afford, and then I stumbled in a daze over to the wall that held old-school gear.
(Used guitars, normally sold on consignment.)

And there she was.
The blue beastie.
A dirty, dusty, gunked-up, cruddy Ibanez Artcore AF75.
She was battle-scarred, finger-printed, and dinged-up.
At least 12 years old.
She had a very dated, absurd lightning bolt logo on the headstock.
All her chrome metal bits were corroded.
The strings were poorly mounted, and at least five years old.
She was butt-ugly.

But something about her spoke to me.
I lifted her off the wall, and asked one of the young dudes if I could plug her in.

He brought me a cable, and sat me down next to a Line 6 amp with very simple features and a really nice variety of tones.

Sure enough.
The blue beastie sang like a guitar worth at least six times her stated value. ($199 was on the sale tag.)
She was dirty and beat-up, and her electrical connections and volume/tone pots needed some contact cleaner and some TLC, but I am pretty sure that she was built for me. She had just gone thru a few owners before she finally found me.

So we rang her up, and into the Subaru she went.
I hit a few potholes coming down Capshaw Road, and don’t you know that blue girl twanged a vintage Beatles chord at me?

Long story short, I spent five hours that afternoon tearing the old girl apart.
Setting the intonation, cleaning, scrubbing the rosewood fingerboard, polishing, smoothing the frets, chrome-polishing the bridge, spritzing the jack and the pots with electrical contact cleaner, mounting a new strap button on the back, re-stringing, tuning up, waxing her up with Turtle Wax, and finally plugging her into the Crate Telluride amplifier.

I tell you what.
The Blue Beastie had found her home.
For awhile, anyway.

She had an impressive tone and a great feel.
She smelled kind of old, and will only shine up but so good. She was road-worn.
But, whenever I brought her to a gig, everyone in the band wanted to play her.
It was the only guitar that gave us the right tones for Collective Soul's song Shine.
We gigged with it for three seasons.

After our band’s drummer Bob died of cancer a few years ago, I began corresponding with Bob’s brother Mark, who lived in Oregon.

Mark is a guitar player who never managed to play live on stage with his brother Bob.
The timing just never worked out.

I mailed the blue beastie to Mark, because his brother had played many gigs behind that guitar.

Mark Fillman has that guitar now, and it has found its forever home.
(Me and the blue beastie, back in the day)
xibanez,P20AF75_v_1428881406.JPG.pagespeed.ic.BoLSEvegw2.jpg
Great story, sometimes the guitar picks you.
 

Controller

Poster Extraordinaire
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Posts
5,153
Location
Montana
Congrats, love Ibanez! I have an AS73 for my ES335 fix and bought an AF75 and really liked it but the neck was a D profile and my hands couldn't deal with the pronounced shoulders on that neck. I am still tempted to try another one. What is the neck profile on your AF95?
 




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