NGD '50s J-50

goonie

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The actual NGD was a couple of weeks ago but with work and visiting relatives, it's taken me a while to get this new Gibson playing to its full potential. A beautifully constructed guitar but like many new acoustics, it needed saddle and nut work. The nut slots were way too high for my liking; got them just right now, a tiny gap above the first fret when fingering behind the third. There was lots of saddle to play with, and it was easy to get the action at 5/64 - 4/64.
This is an inspiring guitar to play. Responds so well to vigorous strumming; that top starts singing. I was playing it for my wife and she said she could hear all the notes individually. I guess that's what they call separation.
Looking forward to playing this for many years and then passing it on to my son. It's a worthy family heirloom. PXL_20220425_145454487.NIGHT.jpg
 

Chiogtr4x

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The actual NGD was a couple of weeks ago but with work and visiting relatives, it's taken me a while to get this new Gibson playing to its full potential. A beautifully constructed guitar but like many new acoustics, it needed saddle and nut work. The nut slots were way too high for my liking; got them just right now, a tiny gap above the first fret when fingering behind the third. There was lots of saddle to play with, and it was easy to get the action at 5/64 - 4/64.
This is an inspiring guitar to play. Responds so well to vigorous strumming; that top starts singing. I was playing it for my wife and she said she could hear all the notes individually. I guess that's what they call separation.
Looking forward to playing this for many years and then passing it on to my son. It's a worthy family heirloom. View attachment 976908

You're in good company! (photo)

Despite playing guitar 48 years ( 30 years of gigs), I've actually not played that many guitars over all these years and owned only a few acoustics- my Martin D-1, 30 years next year!

But THE NICEST ( warmest tone, comfy, beautiful) acoustics I've ever played were '50 and '51 J-45's, from a private dealer.
Great, light players, with both that 'thumpy or woody' low end, but chimey, ringing treble- fantastic!
 

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zombywoof

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You're in good company! (photo)

Despite playing guitar 48 years ( 30 years of gigs), I've actually not played that many guitars over all these years and owned only a few acoustics- my Martin D-1, 30 years next year!

But THE NICEST ( warmest tone, comfy, beautiful) acoustics I've ever played were '50 and '51 J-45's, from a private dealer.
Great, light players, with both that 'thumpy or woody' low end, but chimey, ringing treble- fantastic!

A '50s J50 is pretty much a J50 Standard with a different pickguard and bit beefier neck carve in between a Standard and Slash J45. The neck though is for me what makes the guitar more desirable than many of Bozeman's offerings.

For many years it was rumored Dylan's script logo J50 was a J45 which had lost its finish. 1946 was generally considered to be the last year for the script logo and Gibson ledgers show that no J50s were shipped that year. Over the years though one or two other script logo 1947 J50s have been confirmed. Unfortunately Dylan's guitar was lost in an apartment fire or something.

I play a 1942 J50 so the OP's guitars granddaddy.
 

mimmo

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Great choice, congratulations!
After many years I have finally pulled the trigger on a J-45 original 50s so I do know that your J-50 is a great instrument.

Play the heck out if it!
 

WingedWords

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That looks lovely.
Back in the late 60s this was the first time GAS struck me
61EIiMb0eWL._SY780_.jpg


John Renbourn - and Bob too of course. It was an impossible dream back then and still I've never quite achieved it. I've got a nice enough Martin OM, but for me a J50 is what an acoustic should look like. Maybe one day.
 

uriah1

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Nice

I forgot what the difference between the J45 and J50 were.
I have a natural color J45 that some think is a J50.
 

Chiogtr4x

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Nice

I forgot what the difference between the J45 and J50 were.
I have a natural color J45 that some think is a J50.

I thought the natural finish top vs. Sunbursrt was the only difference- therefore no such thing as a natural finish J-45?

but maybe I'm wrong

( this is exactly what I've read, on a recent feature on Bob Dylan's acoustic guitars, when a J-50 is described- but maybe incorrect?)
 

uriah1

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I thought the natural finish top vs. Sunbursrt was the only difference- therefore no such thing as a natural finish J-45?

but maybe I'm wrong

( this is exactly what I've read, on a recent feature on Bob Dylan's acoustic guitars, when a J-50 is described- but maybe incorrect?)
Maybe since I have the banner logo. Hmm
 

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fasthand

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Really nice piece I’m envious to be sure
When I was a teenager I had a 60s with a adjustable bridge the one guitar I truly regret selling I was young
Any how congratulations
The Loft at Lays in Akron has a nice example that continues to peak my interest
 

zombywoof

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That looks lovely.
Back in the late 60s this was the first time GAS struck me
View attachment 977172

John Renbourn - and Bob too of course. It was an impossible dream back then and still I've never quite achieved it. I've got a nice enough Martin OM, but for me a J50 is what an acoustic should look like. Maybe one day.

For me it was Jorma whom I saw play a J50 with the Airplane and Hot Tuna. Unfortunately, Bozeman makes no guitar with the non-scalloped bracing which went hand in hand with the big pointy pickguard and 20 frets. Those guitars had a quicker decay particularly on the low end leaving the midrange and treble fundamentals giving them a more raw throated snap. More than a few feel the necks on the '55 to '59 Gibsons which clocked in at a depth of between .910" and .930" at the first fret remain the most comfortable carves ever to grace a Gibson.




Then there was this guy.
 
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