New Tool Day (CNC)

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Guitar novice, Oct 28, 2015.

  1. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !

    I also found a lot of dip-and-move for some features in my cutter paths. It is the nature of the automation software. In a production-type environment where the machine would be set to cut the same thing all day long then you could and will want to tweak the code. Some CAM software will have better options. I'm working with PyCAM right now and it can do linear X-Y based paths plus contour-following paths (think cutting in a circle down into a pup pocket vs cutting your lawn back and forth before stepping down). Favoring X vs Y depending on the part can reduce time (one test of mine was 2 hours run time simulated using X vs 1 hour simulated using Y orientation). I'll have to see what options are available in Mach3 that you're using.

    I had really slow Z moves when I did 2D vector sketches in Inkscape with the CAM output plugin for initial testing. When I modeled my most recent test in FreeCAD (regular full 3D environment) the Z moves are as fast as the other axis. So it is software chain related.

    I have a smaller machine than yours (Shapeoko3 kit) and have been running in the 200-300mm/minute rate (douglas fir plywood). I plan to do some tests (method tbd) for a bunch of simple shapes to go across a board at increasing feeds to see where the tolerances get wacky (like a circle becomes a spiral). I accidentally hit the 'return to home' software button during a test cut and the machine moved crazy fast diagonally in xyz back to origin and made a long channel in the workpiece with more ease than I expected - thinking I have been babying this machine now.


    Nice project btw. I hadn't been thinking of holiday gifts off the machine for testing ... that gives me some ideas for mine :)
     
  2. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Congrats Mathew, always fun to see the outcome of the first project. I find that my cam program has a different logic than what I would do myself, but heck it might have a good reason.

    I still go easy on the Z speed. Mine is adjusted in the tool library. I will increase the speed at some point.

    Have fun!
     
  3. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Ditto, congrats on your progress. It truly is a gas working with CNC from the modeling all the way through to the cutting. It really does get much more intuitive after a while. So much is sensory on the cutting end of things. Is it laboring? is it purring? are they nice uniform chips flying out? Is the bit cool to slightly warm? Etc.

    All my work is in metric measures, but for what it's worth I generally cut from 500-2500 mm/min depending on depth and bit size for larger scale stuff and 300 mm/min or less for micro (like MOP inlay or fret slots). Z axis typically 75-150 mm for me.

    Ditto on the dust control. I just hooked up my shop vac to my dust collector. Noisy but works great.

    steve
     
  4. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    A long overdue update.

    I've spent the last month working on my cad and cam skills. It's definitely getting there as I can design a part in about the 10th of the time it took me at the start. Still getting comfortable with the cutting on the machine and it feels like i'm getting a better understanding what the machine is capable of.

    One of my projects has been to cut a disc with a golf course logo. The design was a bit too small for the bits I was using so the resolution wasn't the best. A good learning experience anyway.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    I also had surfaced my spoil board. Turns out that the 6090 router actually gives me 697 in the x and 937 in the Y. Happy about that. When I did the spoil board I simply made a tool path that went back and forth but kept it at z = 0. Then when I got my z level I put in .1 so it just went down .1of a mm. Really easy to do and didn't need to bother with setting depths in the cam side.



    Cheers

    Matthew
     
  5. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Fun stuff! Your machine is impressive.
     
  6. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks Andre,

    Very happy with the machine. Just need to find more time to play with it.

    It's Australia day today so i'm hoping to get a few sneaky hours into it today. I'm half way of designing a dust shoe as my old one came out the side and hits the gantry when x is over to the right.

    Cheers

    Matthew
     
  7. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    A bit more mucking around on the machine yesterday.

    Made a 2d contour cut on the HDPE. The detail of the fish logo didn't come out as I was expecting. I probably need to use a finer tool however I don't have one that is in a single flute version. I did try a 3 flute upcut but that that seem to give not a great finish.

    The swirl marks in the photo look bad but they are actually smooth. I think I could probably steel wool them out.

    [​IMG]

    What I learnt from this cut was how to do a profile cut without hitting the spoil board. I set the z from the top of the spoil board. In the Cam package I set the bottom height to be .3mm above the z=0 point. I was holding this down with double sided tape and that seem to be enough tolerance for it to cut the part out without touching the spoil board.

    Here is a quick youtube clip of the machine cutting the plastic. Seems really easy to cut.



    Cheers

    Mathew
     
  8. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    Its fun figuring this stuff out Mathew . I found that once I started working off the spoilboard as z zero rather than top of work it was more intuitive to my thinking and I also no longer hit the spoilboard . I set up my work that way now at least 95% of the time. Usually I'll work from top of work piece Z zero only on diamond drag bit jobs , have to set z manually on those anyway .
     
  9. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    thats interesting Herb cause i went the other way. it seemed more intuitive to me in the beginning to use tabletop as Z zero but i have gradually moved towards using the model top the majority of the time. Which just goes to show theres a lot of ways to approach this stuff. sort of whatever works best fer ya.

    steve
     
  10. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I started off running off the top of the work piece , but once I started setting Z at the table with my fast tool change post p I found I didn't have to worry about setting local z anymore , just enter accurate thickness of material in my CAM , calibrate tool measure switch to table , set xy local and hit enter , just saved a step for me , and i got comfortable doing it that way . But you are right , many ways to do this stuff , the best way is the way you are most comfortable with
     
  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    With my aluminum table and no spoil board, I find it easier to go off the top of the material. That way I can leave a little wood between the table and end product, keeping the part in position with just a little clean up of " flash". This works well especially on necks that are going to get a fretboard glued on, because after attaching it, I can make that eased edge blend right in.
     
  12. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Yep, I have been doing that a lot lately too Marty, especially with smaller parts to keep everything more stable during cutting. It's easy to get that last 0.5mm or less of skin off and I don't get tape goo on my bits (I use tape a LOT).

    Herb, no quick change for me sadly. But I've gotten more adept and changing bits manually. I actually have the auto zero device that CRP sells but I wasn't real happy with the results initially. I may have to give it another try now that I'm more comfortable with things in general.

    Steve
     
  13. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I don't have atc Steve , I still change out bits manually , my setup has a tool measure pad mounted to the frame permanently , the fast tool change I referred to is just a function of my tool paths and post p in conjunction with tool measure , it stops when a tool change is called for , I change tool out for next called for tool , hit enter , it measures tool , put dust boot back on , hit enter , runs next tool path and so on until file is done . I also have a portable touch off pad that I have and still use when working off top of material.
    ATC with a spindle would have cost me more than my machine costs were to start with , not to say that I don't wish that I had both :D
     
  14. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    Aaah, I see. And yes, those are pricey additions. Gives one something to aspire to though. The spindle in particular would be cool. I'm a little concerned about where I am in the lifetime of the Bosch. I've changed the brushes once at 75-100 hours I'd guess. I have a lot of hours on the thing now. Maybe 300 at a guess. Shows no sign of trouble though. I imagine it helps that it generally isn't run at particularly high rpm's (mostly between 14-17k).
     
  15. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I have a porter Cable 892 in mine , probably have 200 hrs on it , no problems with brushes so far but like the Bosch I can install new brushes if needed , if it ever kicks the bucket beyond a brush change I'll be putting a Bosch 1617 in it , the newer Porter Cables have a compatability problem with the precision collets , I think they changed the cone angle according to Precise Bits. I looked pretty hard at spindles both before and after purchase , for the price of a good Italian made spindle I could go through 10 routers , even the Chinese spindles some of which I hear good reports about are quite a bit more than a router , now if my livelihood depended on the machine it would have a spindle , but as it is the router preforms fine for me , TIR is very low and I've never been lacking for power .
     
  16. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    yep, pretty much feel the same. its an extravagance really. quieter would be nice as would the longevity but not really necessary.
     
  17. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    HI All,

    After a bit of a break from the workshop i've started to get my mojo back and get back into it. Thanks for a few fellow tdpriers for giving me a nudge.

    Not lots to report as life is pretty busy. Couple of quick projects (well not that quick... but will be next time)

    First designed and built a plyo box for crossfire. It's designed for jumping on to give you a workout. Depending upon which orientation you have it you can have the height set at 20, 24 or 30 inches.

    Had little notches cut out and used the bandsaw to take out the rounded sections to give it a nice fit. The plywood bends a bit so it's not a "guitar perfect" fit but it's still pretty good.

    [​IMG]



    Hit with some shellac. First time I have used this stuff. I'll be experimenting with it more as it looks pretty easy to use. I've got an antique bit of furniture I need to restore. I'm thinking about using french polish for that. Expecting that to be quite tricky and time consuming.

    [​IMG]


    Cheers Matthew
     
  18. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    My wife wants me to make a toy box. Unfortunately she wants the length to be 100 mill longer than what my machine can cut in 1 go. Time to work out how to flip it.

    Initial intention is to have indexing pins on some mdf. Problem is that I didn't secure it down enough 3 times!! I have also worked out that the indexing pins are not in the centre point.. i'll need to sleep on this and measure it out carefully when I flip it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Will report more over the next few days.

    Cheers

    Matthew
     
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  19. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Good to have you back on the saddle
     
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