1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

New to binding

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Laren, Jul 12, 2020.

  1. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    214
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2020
    Location:
    West Somerset
    Hi all,

    I'm thinking of trying some binding on a thin line tele type build. I have a router bit that would give me a 1/8 inch cut (3mm approx). When I look up 'binding' it all seems to be 1.5mm thick.

    I'm completely new to this so any help, advice appreciated.

    IMG_20200711_145359.jpg
     
  2. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    12,301
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,185
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
  4. slick4772

    slick4772 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    292
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Since we’re discussing binding - I’ve had success with using just acetone to melt the binding for adhesion to the body. It’s much easier to install it and there’s way less (almost no) mess to deal with after. If there are any downsides to this method, I’d love to hear about it.
     
  5. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    12,301
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    I've been doing it that way for a couple a decades now... NO adverse issues.. the only thing is, the binding must be "agreeable" .. If the acetone doesn't dissolve it some, it will not work..

    r
     
  6. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,501
    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    Knoxville TN for now
    Binding seems like a lot of work ...

    I'll just buy a guitar with binding already on it, thank you ...
     
  7. BBenderNut

    BBenderNut TDPRI Member

    Age:
    32
    Posts:
    30
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2020
    Location:
    San Bruno, CA
    Practice with the router bit A LOT before you actually take the router to the guitar. It's super frustrating if you make a mistake and remove too much wood. I suppose you can make a patch, but your patch will never match the real thing.

    And if the binding is a bit too thicker than your router bit, you can still installed the binding. After the glue has set up, you can trim the excess binding away with a scraper: https://www.stewmac.com/luthier-too...-tools/scrapers/stewmac-ultimate-scraper.html

    I agree with rangecaster. I've done it, and it is a lot of work. But if I can do it, then it's not impossible
     
  8. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    5,630
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
  9. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,614
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    Don't do it!

    Not a fan.... that's all. ;)
     
    fenderchamp likes this.
  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    5,630
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Binding comes in a variety of thicknesses from 0.010 to 0.090 inch, with 0.060 (1.5 mm) a common size. Commercial wood binding is almost always 0.080 thick. Binding is almost always 1/4 tall.

    You adjust the depth of the channel into the side (parallel to the top) by choosing the correct size bearing to use on a trim bit, or by using any of a variety of other devices - most of which somehow index off the side. The bearing is by far the easiest. The vertical depth of the cut (the 1/4) is set by how far the bit extends out of the router. Your bit is probably not the right one for standard binding - sorry.

    Tele's are very easy to bind because of their flat tops and relatively gentle curves - arched tops are infinitely harder. I think binding give a guitar a finished look and it is functional to protect delicate end grain on soft woods like spruce or cedar.

    The link that I posted above goes into binding in a lot of detail. One of the big choices will be what to use for adhesives between the plastic and the wood. Traditionally that was some sort of acetone based glue - either home made or commercial - it is messy and may give inconsistent results - what it is good for is making seamless miters (which you will not have on a tele). I am a big advocate of fitting your binding perfectly without adhesive, taping and clamping in place and then gluing it down with thin CA - I have never had CA fail and I can promise it is much easier to do.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.