New strings - switched to a wound 3rd

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Kmaxbrady, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. Kmaxbrady

    Kmaxbrady Tele-Meister Vendor Member

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    So I’ve been meaning to make the change for a while. Had to swap out the middle saddle on my compensated set. Now all three saddles have the same offset contact point pattern.

    Observations:
    Positive - chords in the first position sound MUCH better. The G string is more in tune on the first few frets and I’m able to play tunes that I never bothered with before on that guitar.
    Negative - the wound 3rd just doesn’t bend the same or sound the same. It’s not bad, just different.
    Conclusion: I’m sticking with the wound 3rd. Can’t beat good intonation.

    Anyone had a similar experience?
     
    Randypttt and bumnote like this.
  2. Blue Ass Fly

    Blue Ass Fly TDPRI Member

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    I use a wound 3rd with 60’s pups
    Love it
    When i bought the pups i read that the g would be overpowering with the raised pole piece ,so use a wound
    Apparently all 3rds were wound in those days ,which is why fender staggered the poles
    I agree bends are more difficult and itll wear the fret quicker too , but the sound to my ears nails that knarly telecaster sound
    My other tele is strung with plain 9’s and sounds very different
     
  3. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Next string change I’m considering the wound third for my gretsch. I’ll be watching this thread.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    I use a wound 3rd (always G) on a handful of my Fenders. My #1 guitar (in my avatar) has one. I go back and forth between 22 and 24 there (often based on what the shop has in stock), with a set of EB Beefy Skinkies (11–54). And my sage green MIM Strat has a wound 3rd.

    The quick way to describe it: It's like playing acoustic.

    The classic Fender pickup designs were all built around a wound third string. String to string volume balance is better, especially noticeable in chords. If you are a bendy lead player, you probably won't dig it (I am not). If you are primarily a rhythm player, and you give yourself a chance to unlearn your old string sets, you'll probably realize that the wound G is superior.
     
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  5. Guitardvark

    Guitardvark Tele-Holic

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    :)
     
  6. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I have a wound 3rd on my jazz tele strung with 12s. Love it. Love the heavier strings too. But I do some bending stuff sometimes, so my main teles are still strung with 10s with a plain G.
     
  7. 39martind18

    39martind18 Tele-Afflicted

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    I play hollow bodies, primarily mini HB equipped, and a wound G is the only way to go for me, usually a 18 wound. The tuning aspect the OP mentioned is the main reason (I play rhythm), but I also like the tonality. Welcome to the club!
     
  8. EllenGtrGrl

    EllenGtrGrl Tele-Holic

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    I've used a wound 3rd string for decades. It sounds better, to me than a plain 3rd string, it feels better playing feel-wise to me than a plain 3rd string, and wound 3rd strings also seem to last longer than plain 3rd strings do (they don't get that annoying buzzy sitar-like sounding tone, that plain 3rd strings seem to get, when they're giving up the ghost). Yes, wound 3rds strings are a little harder to bend than a plain 3rd string, but that isn't a big deal for me, since I've never been much of a blues bender anyway. :)

    I just ordered a 6 pack of Ernie Ball .022" wound Cobalt strings for 3rd string use (due to a severe allergy to nickel, and a major allergy to the chromium used in stainless steel, the only kind of electric guitar strings I can use nowadays [other than Rotosound British Steels - which are a plain steel string], are Ernie Ball Cobalts).
     
  9. superjam144

    superjam144 Tele-Meister

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    I have wondered about the metals in the strings and if they can be detrimental to us players somehow. What symptoms do you feel if you don't mind me asking?
     
  10. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    I like a wound 3rd for 11s and up. Better balance. Never noticed an issue with bending.
     
  11. EllenGtrGrl

    EllenGtrGrl Tele-Holic

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    I get mega dermatitis. It started about 10 years ago, when I started getting breakouts on my arms in the winter time. Since I'm also an asthmatic, and many asthmatics suffer from eczema, I assumed, that I was suffering from eczema. Things reached a head during ye olde polar vortex of the winter of 2013-2014, when I got it so bad I looked like a burn victim (I also was starting to get a staph infection, complete with fever and chills). I had it all over my body, but surprisingly, not on my hands (where most guitar players with a nickel allergy get it).

    It took a coworker of mine putting me on the spot during a meeting, forcing me to get see my allergist/asthma doctor (who has also dealt with dermatitis) to learn that what I was suffering from was not eczema, but severe dermatitis. My doctor took one look at me, and said, "no!, you have such severe dermatitis, that you need to see a dermatologist, to determine what's causing this." I was sent to a dermatologist, and after a patch test (where they put 100 plus patches soaked in various allergens on your back for a few days, to see if you have a reaction to them), it was determined that I have a severe allergy to nickel, and a major allergy to chromium (which is what is used in stainless steel [there is a lot of stainless steel where I work, that I am exposed to - I wear gloves nowadays when handling it]). I told the dermatologist that I was a guitar player, and had read that guitar players will break out on their fingers, why wasn't that the case for me (I had mega dermatitis everywhere, except my fingers)?, and was informed that my dermatitis is very much immune system related. Basically my immune system goes bonkers over nickel, and chromium (especially as used in most forms of stainless steel) - this made sense to me, since I have asthma (which is an immune system disorder).

    I'm sensitized enough to most forms of nickel (the only form I can tolerate, is what you have in the coins you use in a vending machine), that if I play an electric guitar with nickel strings, within about 15 or 20 minutes, my legs start to itch (the reaction usually seems to start in my legs), so if I try out electric guitars, I wear rubber gloves. I can tolerate acoustic guitars for a while, but try to limit my playing of them if they have not been refretted (remember most guitars have nickel alloy frets, and I cannot tolerate stainless steel frets either) with Jescar EVO Gold fretwire (I have all of my guitars refretted with Jescar EVO fretwire, due to it being hypoallergenic). I take a multi-vitamin daily, and I cannot take any vitamins that have chromium in them (like Centrum), or within a day or two, I start having skin breakouts. Yes, I have the immune system from hell.

    I've been playing guitar seriously since I was 15, back in 1979, and I almost gave up playing electric guitars, due to my insane electric guitar string constraints (but not acoustic guitar - I'm OK with phosphor bronze strings) - no nickel strings, and no stainless steel strings, and I don't trust coated strings, because sooner or later the coating peels off, exposing the nickel string underneath. It took me doing research on at least 200 different electric guitar string product lines, to find two product lines that I could potentially use: Rotosound British Steels (which are made out of plain old rustable steel, and are touted as being hypoallergenic), and Ernie Ball Cobalts (which are made out of cobalt alloy, and which I conformed via e-mail to Ernie Ball, are hypoallergenic strings). I went with the Ernie Ball Cobalts, due to them coming in more string sizes, and have been using them ever since (June of 2014).
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2020
    superjam144 likes this.
  12. superjam144

    superjam144 Tele-Meister

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    Thank God for those Cobalts! I am sorry to hear that you have suffered trying to enjoy this hobby.
     
  13. darkwaters

    darkwaters Tele-Afflicted

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    I've always strung my Epi Dot with a wound G (20 years now :eek:). Gives it more of an acoustic vibe, which I like. I've moved away from a wound G on my other electrics, but I'm keeping the Dot as is.
     
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