New Shop Building Project...

Blue Bill

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I'm feeling a little jealous too. That looks awesome. Jim, best of luck in your new shop!

Did the posts get buried in the holes? Was there concrete involved?
 

Jim_in_PA

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Did the posts get buried in the holes? Was there concrete involved?
Yes, they drill holes into the ground to a depth appropriate for one's geography and well below any "frost line". For here, that's 36". A cast high strength concrete "cookie" goes in the bottom of the hole, the posts are stood on top of that (they have uplift-prevention plates on them), a couple bags of dry high strength (5000 psi) concrete gets poured in the hole and then the holes are backfilled while the posts are held plumb. There are other ways to do this, including using posts with pre-cast concrete bottoms (a standard on many Morton buildings ... $$$$$) or pouring piers and using heavy steel brackets to mount the posts. Posts can also be mounted to a traditional poured foundation with the same heavy brackets and that's often used for "barndominium" type structures. What load needs to be borne is kept in mind when choosing how to support the structure. The bigger and heavier the building, the stronger this has to be made as the weight of the building bears on the posts and only the posts. My building is a "baby building" at 24x36x10, so the method we used was more than adequate for several of my remaining lifetimes of service.
 

Jim_in_PA

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Got a vapor barrier down and the start of the foam insulation after the inspector gave approval for the concrete crew's prep work. The rest of the foam will go down and get taped tomorrow...TDPRI forum member I_build_my_own is coming to help. The concrete pour is bright and early Monday morning.

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Telekarster

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Fellow TDPRI member I_make_my_own came over to help me get the foam insulation board down in the shop building project in final preparation for the floor pour that's happening bright and early Monday morning. I really appreciated his help for sure!

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That is awesome Jim! I had to go back and re-read all this cause I hadn't seen your thread since you first put it out there LOL!!! Wow... looks great! I want this shop very, very badly ;) So... you put the concrete right over the foam board??? Never heard of doing that, not that that's sayin' anything, just curious as to how the concrete should react with it and the benefits of doing this. Looking really nice Jim.... REALLY nice!!!
 

old wrench

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Using rigid foam insulation board under a slab on grade has been done for quite a while now

We started doing it back in the 1980's

You do it one time - and it pays back in heating savings over the entire life of the building

The foam doesn't degrade, and it doesn't detract from the structural strength of the slab

You'll see it used more often just around the building's perimeter, where it extends in about 24" from the outside edge of the building

By installing insulation around the perimeter, it stops the frost and cold from creeping in - like thermal break

Running insulation under the entire slab like Jims done will allow the whole floor to warm up relatively quickly without transferring its heat down into the sub-grade

It should make for a real comfortable shop with a nice even temperature - no cold feet! ;)

.
 

Telekarster

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Using rigid foam insulation board under a slab on grade has been done for quite a while now

We started doing it back in the 1980's

You do it one time - and it pays back in heating savings over the entire life of the building

The foam doesn't degrade, and it doesn't detract from the structural strength of the slab

You'll see it used more often just around the building's perimeter, where it extends in about 24" from the outside edge of the building

By installing insulation around the perimeter, it stops the frost and cold from creeping in - like thermal break

Running insulation under the entire slab like Jims done will allow the whole floor to warm up relatively quickly without transferring its heat down into the sub-grade

It should make for a real comfortable shop with a nice even temperature - no cold feet! ;)

.

Thanks for explaining that man! Much appreciated and will keep this in mind, if I ever embark on such a project at Jim's done ;) Man... I sure would like to have a shop like that!
 

Jim_in_PA

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Should be right around 11 cubic yards of concrete at a full 4" thick

How did the pour go?

.
You're spot on with 11 yards for the floor and small apron. :)

Pour went very well and since the concrete supplier is literally around the corner (less than a half mile by road) the two trucks were actually "on time". The foreman will be back tomorrow morning to cut the relief lines and also deal with some "fuzziness" that's there from the fiber mesh that I'm not happy with. I'm not expecting a polished floor, but it needs to be smooth. They will deal with it.
 

old wrench

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You're spot on with 11 yards for the floor and small apron. :)

Pour went very well and since the concrete supplier is literally around the corner (less than a half mile by road) the two trucks were actually "on time". The foreman will be back tomorrow morning to cut the relief lines and also deal with some "fuzziness" that's there from the fiber mesh that I'm not happy with. I'm not expecting a polished floor, but it needs to be smooth. They will deal with it.

Yeah, those fuzzies sticking up from the fiber-mesh don't look good at all, but they will wear off pretty quickly - or they can be eliminated by a pass or two with a power trowel after the surface tightens up

With the way you prepared the sub-grade, you should have an excellent floor

I'm glad things went well :)

.
 

Jim_in_PA

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Yeah, those fuzzies sticking up from the fiber-mesh don't look good at all, but they will wear off pretty quickly - or they can be eliminated by a pass or two with a power trowel after the surface tightens up

With the way you prepared the sub-grade, you should have an excellent floor

I'm glad things went well :)

.
The concrete folks were back today to cut the relief lines and also brought a big floor buffer with an abrasive pad. The pad got most of the "forest" of fibers and they left me a nice, unopened 5 gallon container of sealer to roller apply once the dust settles and I can clean it better. This should deal with any remaining fibers which are only on the surface now, not sticking up.

The floor really is great...pretty much darn level. (which was a goal after enduring a sloped floor for decades in the old shop at the old property) I wish I could have done a wooden floor, but that wasn't in the cards, so serious anti-fatigue mats will deal with it once I'm moved in and have things arranged. But that's likely months away due to both the work I need to do as well as being careful with money, given the market is down at the moment. I need to reduce what I'm withdrawing monthly for a bit.
 

Telekarster

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That's fantastic Jim! I love your new shop!!! Can't wait to see that floor. I have those rubber, interlocking, mats in my little shop and they work really well vs. standing on a hard floor. They were pretty cheap too if I recall. I think each square is 2x2 and it went down in no time flat.
 

old wrench

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The concrete folks were back today to cut the relief lines and also brought a big floor buffer with an abrasive pad. The pad got most of the "forest" of fibers and they left me a nice, unopened 5 gallon container of sealer to roller apply once the dust settles and I can clean it better. This should deal with any remaining fibers which are only on the surface now, not sticking up.

The floor really is great...pretty much darn level. (which was a goal after enduring a sloped floor for decades in the old shop at the old property) I wish I could have done a wooden floor, but that wasn't in the cards, so serious anti-fatigue mats will deal with it once I'm moved in and have things arranged. But that's likely months away due to both the work I need to do as well as being careful with money, given the market is down at the moment. I need to reduce what I'm withdrawing monthly for a bit.

You'll be setting up your new shop before you know it!!! ;)

A couple of months seem to go by in a flash anymore, especially when you are busy building out your own shop

Plus, by building it out of your pocket, you aren't burdened with a loan :)

A nice flat and level floor makes just about everything you do in the shop easier - from machinery setup to project layout and assembly - not to mention framing if you have any interior walls to build

.
 

Jim_in_PA

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That's fantastic Jim! I love your new shop!!! Can't wait to see that floor. I have those rubber, interlocking, mats in my little shop and they work really well vs. standing on a hard floor. They were pretty cheap too if I recall. I think each square is 2x2 and it went down in no time flat.
I tend to buy larger, for purpose, anti-fatigue mats. I do need to find a new supplier as I'm not willing to do business with the previous one for personal reasons, but have identified a few possibilities.. "I like big mats, I cannot lie..." :) :D

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A member of the concrete team was back to day to make the relief cuts. He also brought a big floor buffer and we used an abrasive pad to knock down most of the fiber that was acting like a three day old beard. He left me a five gallon container (brand new, un-opened) of the sealer they use to roller apply as it will take care of any remaining fibers on the surface. He felt...and I agree...that rolling it on will provide the even result I want compared to using the sprayer the way they do. I'm satisfied.
 

Jim_in_PA

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Spray foam moved up to tomorrow from Thursday...the insulator had a contractor message "not ready"...so they are coming here tomorrow, even though he will have to wait a day or so for his check. (Friday's money transfer will not complete until probably Tuesday) But that will check one more thing off my list and allow me to start doing some interior work while I wait for the electrician to complete the trenching and establishing service to the building. I can't go for my CO until that happens.
 




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