New neck, drastic change to sound

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Hamilton, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Hamilton

    Hamilton TDPRI Member

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    I have removed a maple neck from an 1980’s squire, and replaced it with an allparts maple with rosewood neck (wonderful feel) but the tone has gone way trebly and spiky. And oddly enough the neck pick up is now more trebly and cold than the bridge! Can’t get my head around it. I have lowed the neck pup to no effect.

    is this just “one of those things”

    any advise or comments most welcome
     
  2. hydra19

    hydra19 TDPRI Member

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    I would doubt only changing the neck could make the neck pickup sound trebly than the bridge. Some would even say they can't tell a difference with maple vs rosewood. Is it possible anything else could have changed during the swap?
    Is the body Ash? Some say ash bodies and rosewood fretboards are not as traditional as alder and rosewood
     
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  3. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Meister

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    And the strings changed as well? I would start investigating that first of course.

    And of course investigate the setup - are the strings still the same space/distance from the pickups.
     
  4. Verne Bunsen

    Verne Bunsen Tele-Afflicted

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    A thing I always do after mounting a neck is to tune the guitar to pitch (or leave it a step flat if it makes you more comfortable), loosen each of the mounting screws 1/8-1/4 turn, then tighten everything back up. The string tension will seat the neck more thoroughly in the pocket. It makes a very noticeable difference in the sound of the guitar, increased resonance and sustain.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
  5. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I would first suspect new strings, or perhaps the new neck fitting differently than the old one, or being attached more tightly, or something.

    I wouldn't say that different woods have no effect on the sound, but there are lots of other things going on with a guitar that have more of an effect.
     
  6. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    It doesn't make sense to me, either. Three years ago, I changed the "skinny", maple/maple neck on my Tele for a larger mahogany/rosewood neck. It now has a more "substantial" and "singing" sound, but general tone (trebly or bassy) stayed basically the same as before.
    Could you have pulled on pickup wires and changed connections? I'm afraid you may have to take everything apart and re-do it all. :(
     
  7. tube.tone

    tube.tone Tele-Meister

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    Did you change the strings type or manufacturer? Check wiring in case you fiddled with it. Most likely the neck isn’t set right, or needs a proper setup.

    With that being said, woods do affect tone, the variables are too diverse even between same wood types. Could be the neck, body or all as a whole.

    Saying that wood doesn't affect tone baffles me!... any electric guitar that sounds bad unplugged will sound even worst straight on an amp, anyway I digress.

    The bottom line is, it wouldn’t never sound the same with a new neck, unless you put the old neck back in.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
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  8. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I do think necks make a difference. Right now I have ordered a neck to try to clean up a fairly "soft" sounding guitar. It's a shot in the dark though. The existing neck is a bit thin for my liking anyway.
    Not sure about that change in the neck pickup though....
     
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  9. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Meister

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    IME of the wooden parts of a guitar, the neck is the one that has the biggest influence on tone.
    What you describe seems a bit too drastic though.
    Are the frets substantially bigger on the new neck? And what are they made from? Stainless steel jumbo frets will sound much brighter than vintage style ones for instance.
     
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  10. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    No 2 guitars sound the same. It's because of variables in the wood used(neck and body) or the types used.
    All parts of the guitar play a role in how it sounds. Some differences can be very small, some can be night and day differences.
    Some will argue that it doesn't matter in an electric guitar because of the pickups just picking up the string vibrations. Problem is, the strings make the guitar vibrate and the pickups convert that to signal too because they are mounted to it. How does that happen? Microphonics. No matter how much a pickup is potted or sealed, you can't completely take away microphonics, it's inherent to the pickup's design.

    My avatar guitar originally had a Mahogany neck/Rosewood board that really made the plywood hollow body sound dark. I replaced that neck after it broke with a Maple/Rosewood board and now it has great tone. Could I have got a great tone with another Mahogany neck? Due to variables, probably so, but not as bright toned in my opinion.
     
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  11. sonny wolf

    sonny wolf Friend of Leo's

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    I always chuckle when people say wood has no affect on tone...in my experience every piece of wood resonates at a particular frequency which explains why if you take 10 identical guitars of the same series all set up the same and each one would sound slightly or quite different from the other.In my observation Rosewood has a more compressed sound being more midrange focused and honkier sounding which explains why you find it more spiky.Maple necks have lots of clarity and treble but also a fatter bass response too.
     
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  12. tubelectron

    tubelectron Tele-Holic

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    Reading that discussion confirms me that I shouldn't replace the neck of my modded Squier Std Strat which sounds so good for fear of loosing that good tone... o_O (intended to be the spare as close as possible to my US 2012, my Squier made me sold the US because she sounded so weak in comparison to the Squier !)

    [​IMG]

    -tbln
     
  13. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat TDPRI Member

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    Put the Squire neck back on the guitar and see if the tone comes back...
     
  14. Hamilton

    Hamilton TDPRI Member

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    Put the old neck back on, that’s a good scientific approach. But the new neck feels so goooood
     
  15. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

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    The good thing about a bolt on neck is you change them out fairly easy if your not happy.
     
  16. PCollen

    PCollen Friend of Leo's

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    Do it to validate, or not, your perception of the problem.
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    People wouldn't overreact and say this to you, with all due respect, if you could modulate the amount of passion you may show for "wood being everything".

    I'm in the middle, watching people lobbing bombs at each other. Wood can matter. But people get carried away as to how much.

    The two camps remind me of two mobs of people, one who says a Sandwich should be free and the other says the Sandwich should cost $ 2,000.00.
     
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  18. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    We think of old Squiers as having been tossed together, but sometimes the assembler knows his necks are "weak" and so he might pick a brighter pickup set to put in there.

    I would like the O.P. to check the wiring and find out if it has 1 Meg pots or if maybe the thing isn't wired in a conventional way.
     
  19. RifleSlinger

    RifleSlinger Tele-Meister

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    Did you have a shim in your previous neck? Perhaps neck angle could affect break angle at the saddles? How do the nuts compare?
     
  20. Coyoteaz

    Coyoteaz TDPRI Member

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    I just put a Musikraft neck on my Telecaster. Went from a modern C to a big old baseball bat neck. Both maple. The guitar sounds very different in a good way. I was surprised at the sound difference. I knew it would change some but it sounds like a different guitar now. When I first put it on I didn't like the way it sounded. I put a new nut on it set it up and sounds great now.
     
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