New finish ON TOP of MIM Nashville Finish?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by P-Zilla, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. P-Zilla

    P-Zilla Tele-Afflicted

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    I really want to change the color of my Nash Tele's body. Its CAR and I want to go more of a coral pink.

    I dont REALLY want to strip the whole body. So could I just lightly scuff the clear coat and paint over that? I tryed to find a thread tutorial. But had no luck.

    What do you guys suggest? (Maybe Buckocaster or Jwells could help me out!)

    :D
     
  2. originalmatthew

    originalmatthew Tele-Holic

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    Is it poly or nitro? If it's poly, you should be able to hit it with some 0000 steel wool, give it a coat of adhesion promoter, and then paint it. You'll probably want a coat of primer on it to make sure the CAR is covered.
     
  3. P-Zilla

    P-Zilla Tele-Afflicted

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    Yeah its definitely poly and THICK. But the body sounds great. I could just scuff it with steel wool and the primer will stick?

    Alright now I am in business I might just go snag so light grade sand paper and white primer and prime it up tomorrow since the temp is about right.
     
  4. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    If the poly is thick already, you are likely going to deaden the tone on the body by painting over it. Just a thought.
     
  5. P-Zilla

    P-Zilla Tele-Afflicted

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    I dont buy into that. But we will see. :D

    Plus I am going to go as thin as possible cause this thing has to be ready to play live in two weekends. ;)

    Thanks man!
     
  6. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    What type of clear coat do you intend on using ( brand and method of spraying )? What type of primer and paint do intend on using ( brand and method of spraying )?
     
  7. P-Zilla

    P-Zilla Tele-Afflicted

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    rattlecans preferably.

    I was going to use Deft Clear and Primer. And whatever brand I can find Coral in.

    Trying to avoid acrylic and stick with lacquers.
     
  8. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    Applying lacquer over polyurethane generally results in a " crinkling " of the finish. Even with primer ( lacquer based ) this will likely happen ( to the primer ).
     
  9. P-Zilla

    P-Zilla Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]

    Guess its gonna be all poly.

    Mmmmmm thick poly goodness.
     
  10. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. I would suggest allowing yourself at least 3 - 4 weeks from the time you begin the process of scuffing, priming, painting, clear coating and finishing. I fear 2 weeks will be cutting it close for the curing times on the coats. Good luck. Post pics when you are done.
     
  11. Del Pickup

    Del Pickup Poster Extraordinaire

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    MIM paint finishes are thick.

    And trust me on this, the guitar will sound way better once you get that thick plastic coating off and refinish in a thinner coat.

    I stripped my old MIM strat last year cos I was fed up with the original CAR finish. I used my wife's hairdryer and it took about a day to strip the poly off the body. Sanded the body, applied 2 coats of primer, 2 coats of new colour followed by 2 coats of clear and the whole thing took just over a week to complete.

    I ended up with a guitar that sounds much more 'open and lively' than it did previously. And it's starting to wear nicely in a very natural way which the poly would never have done. (Whether this is a good or bad thing will depend on whether you like reliced guitars or not or whether you want your guitar to look like it just came out the box even after 10 years of hard gigging).
     
  12. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

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    In my experience there are no problems with spraying over a factory poly finish. Reactions occur due to incompatible solvents. A factory poly finish is cured already. You could scuff as mentioned and spray primer. Reranch is my favorite primer to use and is lacquer based. Reranch also sells coral paint, but it is more of an orange color, and of course they sell lacquer clear coat. All that being said, 2 weeks is really not enough time for a good finish as mentioned. Especially if it's your first refinish. If you plan to refinish, plan on that guitar being unplayable for 4-6 weeks.
     
  13. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I agree with ThaLowEndTheory on this.

    The existing Polyester (yes) finish is basically inert. Scuff it create a tooth or mechanical bond; then apply the primer, top coat and clear over that.

    And what everyone has said about time. You will need a lot of it. Second guitar? :^)
     
  14. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was curious as to why every time I have tried this ( twice so far ), the lacquer crinkled up on me? I am not posting this to be argumentative, just curious as to what I may have done wrong.
     
  15. tacomamc

    tacomamc Tele-Afflicted

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    I have to agree here. I did the same on my MIM Nashville, and it was THICK. I didn't paint it though, I just oiled it with some butcher block counter oil from Ikea. I found the same "openess and liveliness" as well. I didn't believe that the paint could impact the tone/ sound at all, but I noticed a real difference after removing it. However, it could be attributed to other things as well, neck removal, new strings, pickup adjustments, ect. In any event, it DID make it at least one lbs lighter, feels about 2 lbs lighter.
     
  16. originalmatthew

    originalmatthew Tele-Holic

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    CastPolymer, Lacquer has solvents mixed in with it that are incompatible with polyester or polyurethane finishes. Another reason it crinkles is that it doesn't mechanically bond to the poly. It lays on top and shrinks when it starts to dry. Even using adhesion promoter as a barrier in between, i have still had major issues putting lacquer over poly or vice versa.
     
  17. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    +1

    I've had the biggest headaches, laying additional coats of lacquer over the initial lacquer coats - even where a shellac or PVA barrier was built up. The new, solvent rich layer acts on the initial layer just like a Paint Stripper product would.

    I genuinely do not believe there's any chemical interaction between the old polyester or urethane and the new finish. It is just that the lacquer is very thin, very fragile and vulnerable. It wants to shrink and there's no way it safely can over a tough shell, and so it may crack. That's part of why I use this Deft stuff; it has some butyls and other plasticizing compounds added that make the "lacquer" more flexible and less prone to shrinking and swelling - to the point some people object if you call it lacquer.
     
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