New Design Proto Build - Lyra

preeb

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Lyra-59 solid body proto

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Deeve

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@preeb - has the MIM in Phoenix put in another order for their collection?

asking for a friend :)

Peace - Deeve
 

thomasfxlt

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The Lyra model has evolved with the addition of a bound top and semi solid core. I received mine yesterday and it’s like nothing I’ve ever played. As Gil posted above, he’s also added a full solid model.

I’ll comment more about this guitar in the coming weeks but I can assure you, it’s a tonal masterpiece. The build, as you know from Gil’s thread’s, is legendary.

After the first 1/2 hour playing this instrument I found myself turning everything off except the compressor (including any reverb). While the Lyra will stun you through a variety of pedals, this girl likes an amp and a cable best. She’s perfect without all the makeup but will knock your socks off when she doll’s it up. The tonal palette is massive, and that’s not an exaggeration. I’ve picked up a few 335’s over the years and you’ll search far and wide to find a semi that sounds like this (and the clean tone is the hallmark; it will almost make you tear up and I’m not kidding).

Enough... here she is.
 

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Jim_in_PA

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Thomas, you are indeed blessed to have that wonderful instrument in-hand! Hopefully, you'll get some time to post more about your sound discoveries, including recordings if you have the time and inclination. These are very inspiring guitars.
 

thomasfxlt

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Thomas, you are indeed blessed to have that wonderful instrument in-hand! Hopefully, you'll get some time to post more about your sound discoveries, including recordings if you have the time and inclination. These are very inspiring guitars.

The “build” gets it’s well deserved respect but the real accomplishment with the Lyra is what you can do with it. I’ll never do it justice but this sweetheart is special. I’ve got one of Gil’s bursts from 2013 and it’s an amazing replica but this is in a class of it’s own.

The blues tone through this 2204 is inspiring.
 

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icegooner10

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Hey @preeb , I'm working on my first build (15 years of dreaming and a couple of false starts along the way) and I'm totally hooked. I've been binging your threads for the last few weeks and I'm so grateful for all the knowledge you are willing to share and the level of detail. Your unwillingness to compromise on quality coupled with your constant search for improvement and innovation is inspiring, to say the least. I've started a detailed project plan for my next build, an LP, which is chock-full of tips, tricks, methods and advice from your threads, so thanks!

I joined this particular forum because I have so many questions for you (sorry :D) on all kinds if topics and methods and what not across different threads, but I wanted to ask you here, if that's okay, about your way of making the wood lighter with water and salt.

I find the fact that you even thought of trying it fantastic, and I loved the Cremona story that inspired you. I wanted to try to pry a little into your methods; how do you wet the wood? Do you submerge the wood completely? How long for each part (sweet&salty)? How long do you dry it afterwards before using it? I assume you use roughly the amount of salt to get a similar salt level as the mediterranean sea? You said somewhere in one of your threads that you don't like a really light neck, does that mean you only use the salted wood for bodies? What additives so you add to speed up the salting proces?

Sorry for the flood of questions, I'm just fascinated by this idea and process and would love to try it one day. If I'm overstepping on some of these, then I will take zero offence to you ignoring some or all of these questions (I realize that you've used a lot of time and effort refining your process and might not want to share some of it).

Thanks again Gil! I'm Ásgeir by the way :)
 

preeb

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Hey @preeb , I'm working on my first build (15 years of dreaming and a couple of false starts along the way) and I'm totally hooked. I've been binging your threads for the last few weeks and I'm so grateful for all the knowledge you are willing to share and the level of detail. Your unwillingness to compromise on quality coupled with your constant search for improvement and innovation is inspiring, to say the least. I've started a detailed project plan for my next build, an LP, which is chock-full of tips, tricks, methods and advice from your threads, so thanks!

I joined this particular forum because I have so many questions for you (sorry :D) on all kinds if topics and methods and what not across different threads, but I wanted to ask you here, if that's okay, about your way of making the wood lighter with water and salt.

I find the fact that you even thought of trying it fantastic, and I loved the Cremona story that inspired you. I wanted to try to pry a little into your methods; how do you wet the wood? Do you submerge the wood completely? How long for each part (sweet&salty)? How long do you dry it afterwards before using it? I assume you use roughly the amount of salt to get a similar salt level as the mediterranean sea? You said somewhere in one of your threads that you don't like a really light neck, does that mean you only use the salted wood for bodies? What additives so you add to speed up the salting proces?

Sorry for the flood of questions, I'm just fascinated by this idea and process and would love to try it one day. If I'm overstepping on some of these, then I will take zero offence to you ignoring some or all of these questions (I realize that you've used a lot of time and effort refining your process and might not want to share some of it).

Thanks again Gil! I'm Ásgeir by the way :)
To make a long story short, try air drying your wood and avoid commercial rapid kiln dried lumber. Average is 1-2 years per 1” of thickness. Flat sawn wood requires about twice that. At this stage the wood cells should be “open” enough for borax treatment. About 48 hours submerged in water/borax (water should turn dirty). This will prevent any fungi from developing and will also make the wood easier to machine later. Next stage is drying for about 30 days (in Arizona).
At this point the wood should be a bit lighter.
Final stage is salt treatment and there are many methods to do this. I prefer the dry method.
For zero finish I need to repeat the salting but only to the surface and with a wet method after the guitar is already built.
Make sure to discard any wood that splits or twists during the initial steps.
 

Samuel1343

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Old school oil pore filler mixed from boiled linseed oil, 4F pumice, mineral spirits, lacquer and oil soluble dark mahogany aniline pigment powder.

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Application is with a brush and then I force the stuff into the pores with burlap

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Once it hardens a little about 30 minutes later I repeat and leave it until the shine is gone and it's looking a little hazy

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then I scrape it flat and hang it for 48 hours. Very messy process... but it has to be done properly twice in order to allow a good surface for super thin lacquer coat.
This all bloody unreal! Do you happen to have any ratios for your pumice pore filler mix?

I’m about to apply pore filler to my first 59 build, but I can’t find any ratios for the old technique 😬

Kind regards,

Sam.
 

Freeman Keller

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Gil, your Rusty Cherry is very close to the color I want to put on my current build, a little archtop inspired by the old Gibsons. I don't want the dark edge of a Cremola or tobacco burst, just the amber center fading to red/brown on the sides. Woods are spruce and mahogany, I'm wanting to darken the back and sides a bit and have the top fade into it. I haven't done a tinted shellac finish and this isn't the place to learn, but I think I can get close with just stains and lacquer. I assume you mix dyes to get that color, do you mind saying what you did use?
 

preeb

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Gil, your Rusty Cherry is very close to the color I want to put on my current build, a little archtop inspired by the old Gibsons. I don't want the dark edge of a Cremola or tobacco burst, just the amber center fading to red/brown on the sides. Woods are spruce and mahogany, I'm wanting to darken the back and sides a bit and have the top fade into it. I haven't done a tinted shellac finish and this isn't the place to learn, but I think I can get close with just stains and lacquer. I assume you mix dyes to get that color, do you mind saying what you did use?
Please post a photo of the color you are referring to.
 




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