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Never heard of Stevie Ray Vaughn ...

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by jackinjax, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. drlucky

    drlucky Tele-Holic

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    Bingo. I first heard of SRV in an interview Jimmie Vaughn did in Guitar Player in 1980. I was into Fabulous Thunderbirds, Rockpile, Dr. Feelgood, blues (basically all roots oriented) guitar music. In the early 80's there was nothing like that on the radio (at least in Fresno). When I first heard Let's Dance I thought, "wow, who's the guy playing the guitar?!?" Found out it was SRV. I still remember the first time I heard Pride And Joy: it was on the radio while I was riding with a buddy on the way back from the Coast. I swear, sent chills up my spine to hear something like that on "regular" rock radio. Got to see him in late '84 at the Warnor's Theater in Fresno. Incredible show, even if he was struggling with his demons at the time.

    It's unfortunate that so many of those who were influenced by SRV never found their own style, or built on what he did...sorta like all the EVH wannabes that started showing up in the early 80's...
     
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  2. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    Treat yourself to SRV Live at the El Macombo DVD.
     
  3. Flat6Driver

    Flat6Driver Friend of Leo's

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    I find myself in a similar situation. I like music for the song's sake. I have been familiar with some of the sidemen of the artists or bands I liked but nothing like the TDPRIers that know the 3rd string touring guitar player behind so-and-so artist. I don't know if that's really impressive or sad (do they like *music* or just guitar players??) :)

    That SRV video was funny, never seen that and it would have been in my prime MTV watching days. I had a friend that was into guitar back in HS (I was not) and he was a big SRV fan....he was really sad after the copter crash. I didn't resonate with me, but I remember hearing Tightrope and Crossfire on the radio around that time. (Before or after he died, I don't exactly recall).

    I find new (old, dead) artists I like all the time. Nothing wrong with that I suppose.
     
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  4. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    To my ears, SRV was finally starting to find his own voice, later in his career...for my taste, his virtuosic chops could be troublesome, as he would play Jimi Hendrix/Albert King stuff all night. Johnny Winter paved the way for fellow Texan blues-rockers, like Billy Gibbons & the Vaughans...listening to his earlier, pre -Columbia Records recordings, Johnny already had his voice together, guitar-wise. As I've said in the past, I got to see Stevie 5 times, from his first '83 tour, to the final one in '90. Like Mike Eskimo, I prefered his later, drug free playing, as he starting to find himself...just imagine where his career could've gone?
     
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  5. brogh

    brogh Moderator Staff Member

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    check out the " one night in texas " & " live at the mocambo " they should be on YT
     
  6. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, srv was a monster player but what fascinated me about him was his dexterity. Take 'dirty pool' for example man my hand would fall off after about a minute of that!
     
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  7. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    Notice how many of these wannabees seem to miss the whole point? Few of the EHV wannabees could write a catchy song to save their life. All Eddie ever did was lock himself into a room for 12 hours a day writing songs on the guitar (and getting wasted....different thread). Yngwie Malmsteen inspired a bunch of guys to learn the harmonic minor scale, but they played with high-output pickups and tons of gain (Malmsteen preferred weak single coils and a moderate amount of gain), and didn't have the fury or passion to give their playing any character. SRV wannabees that I've heard can pull off his tone and technique, but can you name any of them?
     
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  8. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    Just signed up for this thread.

    I'm 39, I wasn't really aware of who SRV was till I started taking guitar lessons earlier this year. I didn't really put all the pieces together until I got asked to work on the intro to Rude Mood as practice for muting. I had heard "Pride and Joy" about a million times over the years, it's always been a staple song played on the rock stations in the Boston area at least since the 80s, although these stations themselves seem endangered now. His song Crossfire was also played over the years, but less. I just didn't really know who he was and if the song was on I couldn't have told you it was SRV. I was 13 when he died, so maybe it's easier to understand, but on the flip side he was definitely getting played here in the 1990s when I listened to tons of music on the radio, starting buying music, etc..

    The only thing odd about that is I am the type of person that seems to be able to name songs after about the first 2 bars with a pretty good accuracy. If I hear something usually even once or twice and I'm told who it is and the name of the song I usually won't forget, with the exception of classical music that is often just described with an opus #. That stuff is way harder to remember.

    But then that is one of the great things about participating as opposed to just listening, you sure get exposed to a lot more music.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
  9. Dan R

    Dan R Poster Extraordinaire

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    I total agree with others who said SRV was reaching his peak when he died. He had so much more to give, IMO. "In Step" is a masterpiece as far as I concerned. It's too bad that he might be 'pigeon holed' as a one dimensional bluesman.
     
  10. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    We call the guys that played the DFW style blues in the local style before it got all "David Bowied" the "originals"... I worked for one... Henry Lee (fantastic player). Once Stevie broke loose, all the originals moved on to a more jazz infused Texas shuffle/boogie style... the ones left doing "Cold Shot" schtick were the "Me Toos". This whole thing is a sore subject here in Texas and we are very intolerant of a Stevie wannabe that ain't bringing it. There are some great players down here that wouldn't be caught dead doing a Stevie thing. He was great. But he represented a scene that existed area wide in the 70's. Good news is, its very cool and unique again... lots of great new and old players in a vibrant music scene that is very diverse. Very exciting again...... Jerry Don Branch/Buddy Whittington/Jimmy Wallace/Henry Lee are "originals" if you get the chance to see them, DO!!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
  11. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

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    The people listening to Madonna and snyth pop would never be interested in blues based guitar players. Nor have they seen or heard much or them to have the air freshened. The USA is not the world. SRV was virtually unheard of outside of the US, even when he was successful. I was listening to Purple and Zeppelin and that kind of stuff in the 70s and eighties. The only way you hear about people like SRV, is through being a player, or being interested in guitar based music.

    Bonamassa is considered very successful, Like wise Vai and Satriani. Ask someone on the street, or even someone who you believe is into music, who they are.
     
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  12. homesick345

    homesick345 Poster Extraordinaire

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    there's is hardly any younger blues guitar player who is not influenced by SRV

    His influence on the Blues is huge really
     
  13. Mechanic

    Mechanic Friend of Leo's

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    At the time of SRVs death I'd been listening to him for a while. I was not playing at the time. I had a good stereo on a cart that annoyed the hell out of everyone. Being senior mechanic I got away with it. I'd just discovered Dwight and Pete, and a lot of new country, Ramones, and played at that time odd music. Salt Lake was hosting the Winter Olympics. We'd borrowed 20 light rail cars and their crews from Dallas to do this. I was in my area playing music some what subdued due to a problem I was trying to solve and just happened to play Texas Flood. These guy went nuts yelling for me to crank it up. Collective moan from our guys. I played a lot of SRV at that time. Wish I could play a tenth as well. One always wonders what could have been.
     
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