Neo D...(sp?) speaker vs. Ceramic & Alnico

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by KingFool1, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. KingFool1

    KingFool1 TDPRI Member

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    I'm thinking of changing out the speaker in my Peavey Delta Blues 115. How does the sound of the NeoD speakers compare with Ceramic or Alnico? I know that there's a tremendous weight saving which would be wonderful but I'm more concerned about the sound.
    I played mostly a blues/country/rock and I tend to prefer Alnico speakers for the most part although I know there are some very fine ceramics also.
     
  2. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Let me state right up front I'm all for neodymium speakers. I had a long conversation with the chief engineer at the world's largest speaker manufacturer talkin' about their line of neo guitar speakers.

    Having said that the biggest drawback to neo speakers is availablity in all sizes for all tastes. You pretty much have to take what you can get with neos. Musicians are slow to embrace new technology, kinda like me 'n' modeling amps. They're slow to embrace this technology.

    Neo speakers additional drawback: Many engineers embraced the incredible flux density of neodymium and used outrageously strong magnets. Guitar amps speakers are not necessarily an application where more is better. Too much flux density i.e. a maget that's too strong may sound harsh. It's great for P.A. use where you want a speaker that weighs as much as a potato chip and handles 800 watts.

    Neo speaker further drawback: It's whatcha call a "rare earth" magnet. It's rare 'cuz it don't grow on trees. It's considered a strategic material just like alnico was considered a strategic material in the '60s. That means speaker manufacturers might be more enthusiastic about offering more neodymium applications if they could count on a steady cheap supply.

    More specific to the OP's question: New speakers tend to be more precise and hi-fi. Stick with alnico if you like alnico.
     
  3. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    When I first started hearing about "neo" speakers I had no idea what Neodymium was. I thought it was a marketing concept, like those ingredients they use to cell cosmetics: "now with 'revita-Q-oxy-22'". Heck, Neodymium is an actual element, like oxygen! Atomic number 62, right there, above Uranium (not radioactive, whew!).

    According to Wikip, "Although neodymium is classed as a 'rare earth', it is a fairly common element, no rarer than cobalt, nickel, and copper, and is widely distributed in the Earth's crust. Most of the world's neodymium is mined in China."

    Also: "electric motors of each Toyota Prius require one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of neodymium per vehicle." A kilo? That's a lot speaker magnets!

    So it's no rarer than copper, but it comes from China. Hmmm...
     
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