Need help with spraying...

justinMD1212

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Hello all, first let me say thanks for the wealth of info. I joined this forums some months ago and I have used it's vast info greatly while building my first few guitars. I just do much more reading than posting. Also, Ron Kirn, you're awesome. I read your book that you posted on Nitrocellulose and it gave me a much better understanding on the topic.

Okay, so the Tele style build in this pic has been through the steps in Dan Erline's book "Guitar Finishing Step by Step" in the "Steps" chapter. Up until Color Coats I thought I was doing great. I am using a Husky Spray Gun from Home Depot and a Porter Cable 150 PSI 6 Gallon Compressor. Through reading Ron's book I can't figure out if it is a weather issue (it's hot and humid here in MD although I am spraying in my basement so it shouldn't affect it that much) or the "Orange Peel thing. Someone help because I am pulling my hair out. This will be the second time I have had to sand it all back.
IMG_3931.JPG
 

ebb soul

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1-larger compressor
2- drain said compressor every time
But mostly read up on the various stuf you can buy to get a handle on trapping moisture as well as thinners for the different temps, there's a lot of various ways, in line moisture traps etc.
 

billiemorini

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The number 1 reason for orange peel is spraying material too thick. General information says orange peel results from improper painting technique, and is caused by the quick evaporation of thinner, incorrect spray gun setup (e.g., low air pressure or incorrect nozzle), spraying the paint at an angle other than perpendicular, or applying excessive paint.

You do not say whether you have a water vapor knock-out between the compressor and your gun. This is a must. I paint nothing without this.

For small paint jobs like this, I prefer a detail paint gun.
 

Rano Bass

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It looks like you are spraying too much material (paint). What kind of paint are you using and how big is the tip on your paint gun?
To paint guitars you don't need a bigger compressor IMO.
 

McCart

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This is where the learning curve starts. It is so much harder to spray with a cheap gun. That being said. Thin your material and increase your air. You can get cheap little water filters from the paint store that mount right on the gun. They are disposable and cheap. The material should run off a stick thin, not drain off kind of thick. If your compressor kicks on, stop spraying and let it catch up. You will probably have to do it in three stages. First the edge, wait, then a side, wait, and then the other side. Each pass of the gun should overlap 50% of the previous pass. Be sure to treat the edges as a side. Otherwise the material will be really thin there and you will sand through later. It's a lot easier to spray more thin coats than sand orange peel.
 

ebb soul

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" thin your material and use more air"

Yes, and the thinner needs to be rated for the temp, and more air, not with 6 gal tank you won't.
6 gal tanks are for carpenters who do punch out, fire a few nails. My 20 is barely adequate.
HLVP is a great alternative.
 

Informal

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" thin your material and use more air"

Yes, and the thinner needs to be rated for the temp, and more air, not with 6 gal tank you won't.
6 gal tanks are for carpenters who do punch out, fire a few nails. My 20 is barely adequate.
HLVP is a great alternative.


High Las Vegas Painters? :p
 

The Ballzz

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Well, this thread has so far run the gamut of many possible issues contributing to your problem. From my somewhat limited experience, it sure looks like some sort of contamination! Could it be moisture? Maybe. Could it be something imparted to the wood from the rag used to wipe it down? Possibly. Could it be............ Either way, you need to back up and look at each step and track down where the contaminant is coming from!

Yes, I'm from Las Vegas.
And yes, I paint a little.
And well, ..............! :p :D

Just My $.02 & Likely Worth Even Less,
Gene
 

Chritty

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Just a note on pressure, get yourself a gun gauge. Don't guess!
ce5ef3e1135af72ba35fe494df68bedb.jpg


At my work we use Glasurit waterbase. The standard for that is 2bar. For catalyzed paint I use 2.5bar. This is for HVLP
 

dkmw

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Lots of variables and possible causes, and you're getting lots of good advice on troubleshooting here. If you've gotten good results before with your existing gun and compressor (and you are sure that water intrusion isn't the problem, i.e. good water traps in place), then I'd look at material mix, spray technique, surface prep. You have to approach solving the problem logically and make sure each step of material, process, technique is correct.

Surface contamination problems, for instance, can come from the craziest things. Someone can spray insect repellent near your workspace and ruin everything. A wipe-down rag you thought was clean may have fabric softener from the laundry.
 

The Ballzz

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Lots of variables and possible causes, and you're getting lots of good advice on troubleshooting here. If you've gotten good results before with your existing gun and compressor (and you are sure that water intrusion isn't the problem, i.e. good water traps in place), then I'd look at material mix, spray technique, surface prep. You have to approach solving the problem logically and make sure each step of material, process, technique is correct.

Surface contamination problems, for instance, can come from the craziest things. Someone can spray insect repellent near your workspace and ruin everything. A wipe-down rag you thought was clean may have fabric softener from the laundry.

True words here! Fabric softener and/or the detergent used has been known to be a sneaky culprit in this area. I start my re-useable rag washing with a degreaser and then do a "double" wash! Second wash is rinse only! Also make sure that no silicone products make it anywhere near your rags, wood, tools, workbench, etc, etc, etc! Silicone is a bigger enemy to finish than oils! Once any part of your work process gets contaminated with it, it's nearly impossible to eradicate!

Also, I typically "wash" my hands with acetone , alcohol or mineral spirits (depending on what I was monkeying with previously) before touching anything finish related. Regular soap can have stuff in it that can mess with finishes! That smelly stuff that helps keep yer pits from stinkin' can wreak havoc!
Gene
 
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