Need help identifying metal, and how to clean it.

Midgetje94

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While moving and unpacking the last couple weeks. Wife uncovered these owls. Her grandmother gave them to her. She was about to toss them due to condition. I set them aside without her knowing. Hoping one of y’all can identify what type of metal they are, and the best way to clean it.

I’m off today, and she’s at work. So I’d love to have them cleaned up for her
 

Midgetje94

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Helps to add the pictures 🤣
 

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Midgetje94

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If you think they have any value, I wouldn't clean them.

I’m sure it’s just brass or something. Nothing more than sentimental value. She’s on a “decorating” kick. So if it doesn’t look good. It’s not goin out.

Idk how old they are. But they are made in Korea (via a little sticker remaining on the bigger one)
 

RodeoTex

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If they are brass they may well look copper colored after using a brass polish.
I'd just leave them alone.
 

Sconnie

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Is that candle wax on top of the big one? I agree with the others thus far, I wouldn't use a cleaner or polish at all. I'd use a small plastic scraper to gently remove the gunk from the top of the big one, then a dry toothbrush and dry microfiber rag to remove the dust and grime from the rest.

Take your time, maybe add some "hot breath" like you're buffing an apple or some glasses.

If you're still unhappy after that, and they don't have any value one way or another, then go to town with brass polish and a piece of old denim, or a random orbit buffer! The patina will return soon enough anyway, especially it humid Texas.
 

Midgetje94

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Is that candle wax on top of the big one? I agree with the others thus far, I wouldn't use a cleaner or polish at all. I'd use a small plastic scraper to gently remove the gunk from the top of the big one, then a dry toothbrush and dry microfiber rag to remove the dust and grime from the rest.

Take your time, maybe add some "hot breath" like you're buffing an apple or some glasses.

If you're still unhappy after that, and they don't have any value one way or another, then go to town with brass polish and a piece of old denim, or a random orbit buffer! The patina will return soon enough anyway, especially it humid Texas.

See I figured it was brass. Just not sure. I can’t stand brasso. In the Navy we used Texas Pete hot sauce and Tabasco sauce to clean the ships bell.

But yes. That’s candle wax. Probably from a sensy thing. Not trying to restore it to new. Just clean it up a bit, to be more presentable
 
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TomBrokaw

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Your standard death metal is going to have a lot of emphasis on lower-pitched, growled, "Cookie Monster" type vocals. Guitars and drums will be forward in the mix, with the bass further back and generally doubling guitar. Expect lots of Locrian mode. Drums will have lots of double bass, and lyrics will generally be unintelligible. cf Suffocation, "Effigy of the Forgotten."

Black metal will have higher pitched vocals, and the guitar riffs will also often be higher pitched - dissonant chords rather than 6th string riffage. This is one reason that black metal often "sounds" faster than death metal - the staccato chunking of death metal makes it easier to discern individual notes, whereas the tremolo-picked chords of black metal have been described as sounding more like a kind of vibration. cf Emperor, "Ye Entranceperium."

Both of these styles are intended to evoke feelings of power and awe in excess of what humans are capable of.

Power metal is much more melodic and accessible than either of these two. Chord progressions are more conventional, using standard major and minor modes that resolve as expected. Lyrics are intended to be heard, although the operatic range of power metal singers means that the layman may have difficulty singing along. cf Stratovarius, "Eagleheart."

Hair metal, while having fallen out of favor around 30 years ago, can still offer a few gems from its heyday. Unapologetically macho, despite its makers wearing brightly colored spandex, makeup, and big hair, lyrics tend to be less than the music played underneath. The yearning arpeggiated chords of Def Leppard's "Hysteria", or the massive chorus riff of the same band's "Pyromania", lead the listener to think the lyrics would be similarly timeless. However, they are not.

Nu metal blended the crunchy guitars of heavy metal with the street aggression of rap. The most famous band to play that style, Korn, did so well, incorporating raw personal lyrics and rejecting the testosterone soaked attitudes at the time, and continued to evolve throughout their career. Alas, the copycats they spawned were generally not able to maintain the same level of quality, and while Wes Borland's guitar work with Limp Bizkit was exemplary, the lyrical themes could often be reduced to "I'm very angry" or "I like to have sex," leading the way for nu metal to become a parody of itself and increasing resistance for later progenitors such as Linkin Park.

I'm not sure why anyone would want clean metal.
 

notmyusualuserid

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See I figured it was brass. Just not sure. I can’t stand brasso. In the Navy we used Texas Pete hot sauce and Tabasco sauce to clean the ships bell.


Objets d'art are not a ship's bell.

Patination adds depth to a casting.

If you must, anything acidic will remove it. Try rubbing it with half a lemon
 

pbenn

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Your standard death metal is going to have a lot of emphasis on lower-pitched, growled, "Cookie Monster" type vocals. Guitars and drums will be forward in the mix, with the bass further back and generally doubling guitar. Expect lots of Locrian mode. Drums will have lots of double bass, and lyrics will generally be unintelligible. cf Suffocation, "Effigy of the Forgotten."

Black metal will have higher pitched vocals, and the guitar riffs will also often be higher pitched - dissonant chords rather than 6th string riffage. This is one reason that black metal often "sounds" faster than death metal - the staccato chunking of death metal makes it easier to discern individual notes, whereas the tremolo-picked chords of black metal have been described as sounding more like a kind of vibration. cf Emperor, "Ye Entranceperium."

Both of these styles are intended to evoke feelings of power and awe in excess of what humans are capable of.

Power metal is much more melodic and accessible than either of these two. Chord progressions are more conventional, using standard major and minor modes that resolve as expected. Lyrics are intended to be heard, although the operatic range of power metal singers means that the layman may have difficulty singing along. cf Stratovarius, "Eagleheart."

Hair metal, while having fallen out of favor around 30 years ago, can still offer a few gems from its heyday. Unapologetically macho, despite its makers wearing brightly colored spandex, makeup, and big hair, lyrics tend to be less than the music played underneath. The yearning arpeggiated chords of Def Leppard's "Hysteria", or the massive chorus riff of the same band's "Pyromania", lead the listener to think the lyrics would be similarly timeless. However, they are not.

Nu metal blended the crunchy guitars of heavy metal with the street aggression of rap. The most famous band to play that style, Korn, did so well, incorporating raw personal lyrics and rejecting the testosterone soaked attitudes at the time, and continued to evolve throughout their career. Alas, the copycats they spawned were generally not able to maintain the same level of quality, and while Wes Borland's guitar work with Limp Bizkit was exemplary, the lyrical themes could often be reduced to "I'm very angry" or "I like to have sex," leading the way for nu metal to become a parody of itself and increasing resistance for later progenitors such as Linkin Park.

I'm not sure why anyone would want clean metal.
That is a nice piece of work. Thank you.
 

stxrus

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I’d try a mild acid (lemon) on the bottom. That way the real finish won’t be disturbed…until you are ready
 

Old Verle Miller

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They are most likely cast, hollow brass figurine paperweights. Owls have particular significance in Japanese culture but I'm not familiar with what they may mean to the Koreans.

You can get brass clean with a vinegar, salt and baking soda cream. Smear it on let it stand for a few minutes then scrub/rinse.
 

Midgetje94

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They are most likely cast, hollow brass figurine paperweights. Owls have particular significance in Japanese culture but I'm not familiar with what they may mean to the Koreans.

You can get brass clean with a vinegar, salt and baking soda cream. Smear it on let it stand for a few minutes then scrub/rinse.

Likely nothing important. Just where they happened to be made
 

Peegoo

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I would scrub them with denim from an old pair of jeans, or a red shop towel, to add a little brightness to the exposed edges. Not much; just a little.
 

schmee

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They look like brass to me. All kinds of brass stuff was very common coming out of Viet Nam and the surrounding countries. They were made out of spent shell casings from the war, including large howitzer/cannon shell casings. We left a lot of Brass in the country. lamps, knick knacks , ash trays etc abound.
Brasso or the similar stuff works well.
 

dogmeat

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I also think brass/bronze. vinegar should work but it may take longer than you think. I use it to kill rust on steel parts & it takes days. it won't leave a bright finish like any of the metal compounds out there such as Brasso, Mothers, Flitz. vinegar will also get into all the cracks & such and will make the color uniform, you can add highlights with buffing. there are also compounds for re-doing various types of patina. art & hobby shops have some things. check the net,,, there are some you can make yourself too if you go that way. in any case, don't toss them,,, Salvation Army or Good Will will take them
 

MarkieMark

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I'm not sure why anyone would want clean metal.
Don't some call that "melodic metal"?... :)
Owls have particular significance in Japanese culture but I'm not familiar with what they may mean to the Koreans.
Perhaps that there may be a Japanese market for them I reckon?

FWIW, I like them. I'd likely just lightly clean them and keep the patina. Or disperse them into my garden/landscape and let them be who they want to be.
 

Toto'sDad

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Don't some call that "melodic metal"?... :)

Perhaps that there may be a Japanese market for them I reckon?

FWIW, I like them. I'd likely just lightly clean them and keep the patina. Or disperse them into my garden/landscape and let them be who they want to be.
Cleaning them, may ruin whatever value they might have.
 




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