Neck wood/ Fretboard interface

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Slowtwitch, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    322
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2018
    Location:
    South Africa
    I've now built 2 necks and just finishing the 3rd.
    On both the first 2 I found that over a period of a few months, the seamless transition between the neck wood and fretboard there's a very slight ridge which formed you can feel. In other words there's been differential expansion/ contraction of the 2 types of wood.

    The neck was finished to 2000 grit, neck is oiled

    I sanded it flat again on my first neck, so all smooth and seamless again, but I not sure if this will happen over time again and more importantly, how do I prevent this from happening?

    Also, is this a common occurrence?

    IMG_20190609_170543.jpeg
     
    Treadplatedual likes this.
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    20,637
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    Yes, woods move at their own rate. I like to use quartersawn fretboards because there is less shrinking and swelling across the grain. It may have something to do with the relative humidity in your area too and possibly your glue joint. Ideally small guitar manufacturers keep their humidity around 50% if they can.
     
    Slowtwitch and Treadplatedual like this.
  3. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Holic

    Age:
    39
    Posts:
    542
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2019
    Location:
    Paris, France
    Maybe the lumber you used did not have enough time to settle in after gluing and before sanding?
     
  4. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    11,554
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    woods will always shrink and expand at differing relates, even they were both the same species.. It's just one of the joys of wood working..

    rk
     
    eallen, Slowtwitch and Vibrolux59 like this.
  5. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    322
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2018
    Location:
    South Africa
    I leave the neck clamped for 48 hours when gluing the fretboard on, just to be safe.

    We do have about 70-80% humidity, but then again it doesn't vary that much i.e. the wood didn't go from very dry to very humid conditions.
     
  6. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    591
    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Location:
    SE PA near New Hope PA
    The ridge may also be "glue creep" which is not uncommon with PVA glues.
     
  7. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    11,554
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    consider,. we are now in that time of year when the frets ends make their presence known....

    it's not the frets that are expanding... it's the wood shrinking... since both the Fingerboard AND the neck, whatever wood it may be made of will both shrink... the differential may be darn near unnoticeable... but that does not mean "unnoticeable" is the norm.. Wood is wood.. it's as unpredictable as your 15 year old daughter,.... there are good days, then there are those others...:rolleyes:

    rk
     
    Slowtwitch likes this.
  8. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    591
    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Location:
    SE PA near New Hope PA
    And to further clarify, most seasonal movement is across the grain, so with the grain on the neck for both fingerboard and neck structure being lengthwise, any seasonal "shrinkage" is in neck width. The metal frets, on the other hand, don't really change perceptibly.
     
    Slowtwitch likes this.
  9. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    322
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2018
    Location:
    South Africa
    well it sounds like this is normal and expected
     
  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    20,637
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    Well you are in Africa....not sure whether you have heat on or not...:). Your choice of woods could have a bearing on this too. Some woods have a higher degree of dimensional stability. You can probably find that out in some type of Engineer's handbook. For example ebony would be less stable than say mahogany. This instability rears its head on necks that aren't built in climate controlled conditions. I learned my lesson on an ebony fretboard on maple neck built here but ended up in California.
     
    Slowtwitch likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.