1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Neck shape descriptions. Why bother?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Jakedog, May 28, 2020.

  1. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Holic Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    938
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2018
    Location:
    Brooklyn, Joey!
    Really?
     
  2. Yuro

    Yuro Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    127
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago Far West
    ...Me too!!!

    I got a DeTemple "'52" Tele. I wanted light weight and big neck. Ordered with titanium parts, one piece ash body etc. I got it and loved it...so I ordered a matching DeTemple "'56" Strat....but the neck was just enough bigger that it didn't work for me. It was just too big.

    I traded to a high-end store local to me for a Knaggs Strat with glued neck...forget what they're called. That didn't float my boat either, although the neck was perfect. I traded again for a Knaggs Kenai (LP type). Oh, yeah....That hits the mark. Also picked up a hollow version of it...called Chena. Both are super guitars.

    I have definitely done some economic stimulation to find what I like.
     
  3. Downed_Aviator

    Downed_Aviator NEW MEMBER!

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2019
    Location:
    British in Austria
    Out of all the hobbies and other interests that I have had in my life, and there are many, I am 67, nothing comes close to the amount of hype, ********, and sheer fantasy surrounding guitars and their associated gear like amps, effects etc.

    When I was beginning it took quite a while to separate facts, opinions, and fiction. While reviews may be a guide to the general consensus, in my experience the only way to sort out the confusion is to actually get stuff in my hands to try out. Hence my bouts of gear acquisition syndrome, when I just "HAD" to know firsthand how something worked or sounded. Unfortunately I have never worked in a guitar shop that would let me try all the gear, or had a rich daddy who would indulge my endless curiosity.

    I don't believe the same level of cork sniffing exists with other musical instruments.

    Is this a rant?... Maybe (sorry). Oh! one of my words got autocorrected to asterix's. It was BS btw ;)
     
    61fury and Yuro like this.
  4. Yuro

    Yuro Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    127
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago Far West
    Beninma:

    I've had some good luck online over the years. I know that, if you can find a Rory Gallagher Strat online, buy it. They're all good. I passed on one and my friend bought it. Wow, very resonant with great electronics etc. Really nice. Everytime I find one, I pick it up and try it. They all seem to be really nice. Not a lot of them around and they don't come up for sale often. Strats are about the biggest dice-roll for me. Some sound great, some horrid and some more than great.

    I don't buy anymore either without trying them. I know what I like these days. Resonance without plugging it in, light-ish weight, neck pickup has to be bright enough to work for me, tone controls have to be useful and I want good harmonics, even when the volume is turned down.

    I bought a beater Strat with a Warmoth body..partscaster with so-so relic job...but the neck is perfect, it weighs 7.5# on the nose and the pickups and electronics are really SRV perfect. It looks grungy-cool in Oly white that didn't come out right...almost pink. It's my favorite to play out with. So easy to get it singing. I bought it off a rack after just playing it unplugged. I knew it was a great guitar. The top-level electric part was a bonus.
     
  5. Yuro

    Yuro Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    127
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago Far West
    Downed...You are so right...although, you know, all spirits are hype...bourbons, single malt scotches, even beer these days...People wait in line for hours to snag a new limited release beer that tastes like furniture polish. Guitars are good for the soul....especially good ones.
     
    Lance Morgan likes this.
  6. dmarcus30

    dmarcus30 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    667
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Location:
    By the sea, California
    So he asked a legit question and your response is to put him down? How do you know how many years he's been playing?
     
    Lance Morgan likes this.
  7. dmarcus30

    dmarcus30 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    667
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Location:
    By the sea, California
    I have grown to favor bigger necks but I met my match when I played a '57 LP. That thing was a baseball bat with frets.
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  8. Anacharsis

    Anacharsis Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    721
    Joined:
    May 12, 2019
    Location:
    United States
    ...and then Fender throws in "flat oval," but I can't find any description or drawing of it beyond that counter-intuitive name.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2020
    Jakedog likes this.
  9. Downed_Aviator

    Downed_Aviator NEW MEMBER!

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2019
    Location:
    British in Austria
    Ah I could tell you some amusing stories related to whiskey, but it would be way off topic and I don't want to be banned ;)
     
  10. mmannaxx

    mmannaxx Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    216
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    Location:
    Ohio
    I tend to like thicker necks from a comfort standpoint. V or U shapes are fine. Not sure, but it seems to me that the mass of the neck, i.e. more mass, might have a positive impact on a guitar’s tone ( fatter tone). Is this scientifically provable? Probably not since there are so many variables that can impact the tone of a guitar. But the feel of the neck is so important in facilitating the desire to play, so people need to have at least one guitar that they feel really comfortable with and spend more time playing it and less time thinking about neck dimensions. :)
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  11. eisenbug

    eisenbug TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    4
    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Location:
    California, USA
    First of all, what you read as a description is mostly there as a sales tool. So lets get started, practically, as a player or a maker. Simplest to understand is a "V", it's simple because it has a pointy back. The "soft"er it is, the more they've rounded off the corners. People who hold the neck across the palm of their hand tend to like these. Next, before we get into the quagmire that is "C" shapes, is the "D" neck. The "D" is flat in the back, and curved between the fingerboard and the back. People who put their thumb on the back, arch their fingers and use their fingertips to fret tend to like these. The famous Gibson "Slim Taper" is a thin "D" shape. Necks that have a round back are "C" and "U" shaped. Shallower is "C", deeper is "U". There are many, many necks that qualify as being "C" shaped, from a '59 Les Paul to an Ibanez Jem. All "C" means is that it has a round back and it isn't deep enough to be called a "U". Some have sharp edges at the fingerboard, some have round edges. And the fingerboard radius plays into this too. The comfy Fender Stratocaster neck is supremely comfortable because the fingerboard is so curved that the neck as a whole feels like an oval.
     
  12. Rubytone

    Rubytone TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    6
    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Location:
    Weehawken, NJ
    Good thing it's too fat. You can fix that, or have someone else fix it. If it were too thin, it would be too bad. I love experimenting with neck profiles.
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  13. Telenator

    Telenator Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Posts:
    13,990
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Location:
    Vermont
    I don't build guitars any more. By far, the best guitars I've ever owned were bought off the rack.
    There they are. All lined up and waiting on the wall.
    I play one. Then another. And another.
    And sometimes, along the way, one of them is absolutely superb. Well above the rest. It comes home with me. And very often, it was something I hadn't considered before.
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  14. fishermike

    fishermike Tele-Meister

    Age:
    53
    Posts:
    165
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Santa Barbara
    That's a signature-worthy quote if ever there was one!
     
    Jakedog and cravenmonket like this.
  15. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,132
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Location:
    California
    Two words: thin and thick.

    Ok, two more: narrow and wide.

    That should cover it pretty well.
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  16. oregomike

    oregomike Tele-Meister

    Age:
    50
    Posts:
    181
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2019
    Location:
    Hood River, OR
    My favorite neck of all-time (so far) is the Warmoth I custom ordered for my partscaster. 1-3/4 nut, fatback, their 10"-16" rad. Honestly though, my priority in necks is nut width, and a distant second is neck profile. As long as it's not too fat/skinny. I might try a boatneck next time just for ****s and giggles.
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    26,192
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    Word
     
    Jakedog likes this.
  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    26,192
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    I never buy guitars online without playing them.
    OK I bought an '80s Explorer but it had a big neck and Gibson never put a big neck on an '80s Explorer that I found uncomfortable.

    Likewise most older Fender neck on other than Squier or shreddy models are comfortable enough.

    Squier eliminated me as a customer by making too many thin necks.
    Except the first years that were fine.
    Reports of fat Squier necks were greatly exaggerated.

    For my dollar .85 at the first fret is fat enough, though not really the hipster version of fat.
    It's not the thicker or thinner middle that makes or breaks a neck.
    It's the wider or narrower shoulder where I lever for butterfly vibrato.
    So a 1" V is worse than a thinner D or U, which have a wider shoulder than a C of the same dimension in the middle.
    That's where the VCDU terms are useful, assuming the terms are correctly applied.
     
  19. JBaum

    JBaum TDPRI Member

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    10
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2020
    Location:
    3314 Jaffa Drive Sarsota, Fl 34239
     
  20. JBaum

    JBaum TDPRI Member

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    10
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2020
    Location:
    3314 Jaffa Drive Sarsota, Fl 34239
    I totally agree on the c shape description. I owned and played a 1956 telecaster for about six years from the time I was 19 years old to 25 . I have never found too many necks or tone like that guitar. This was back in 1974. to 1980. Now at 64 with a arthritic left hand, neck shape and width is huge to me. I start with neck width at the nut and how flat is the board. I need a little concave. I am always modifying guitars today for neck and lower output vintage pick ups.
     
    black_doug likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.