Neck pocket tool marks?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Shumba, May 16, 2021.

  1. Shumba

    Shumba TDPRI Member

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    I have a finished body that's been sitting around for a little over a year -- it will be my first "build" (assembly, really).

    The neck pocket has what I assume are tooling marks/cutouts that don't make it perfectly level or smooth. I don't think I've seen anything like this before, but I'm not that well-versed on tele building.

    Does this fall into the category of "not really normal but doesn't really matter as long as the neck fits well otherwise"?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    welcome to the forum... glad to have ya join us.. Now.. those are the routing "footprints left as the CNC cut the channel between the neck pocket and the pickup rout... its doesn't mean a thing.. do not worry about it.

    Ron
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    It looks like the cnc router entered a bit deep there. It could be in the gcode programming or just done on a cheap and flexible machine. Years ago it would have been a "2nd", nowadays...not so much. The neck will sit on the wood that is proud of that...no worries.
     
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  4. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    looks to me like it will make the neck tilt back. install the neck and check to the bridge with a long straightedge. it the neck tilts back a standard bridge won't be tall enough. if you are mounting a Bixby or something you might need that angle


    I'd fill (as required) & level. but thats me
     
  5. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Well... yes, if this is actually the case. If the contour we see in the picture isn't proud of the rest of the pocket, it's a non-issue.
     
  6. Shumba

    Shumba TDPRI Member

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    Thanks all -- the contour is slightly deeper than the rest of the pocket, so I don't think it should affect the neck level. I figured the slight area the neck and pocket aren't making contact isn't a big deal, but wanted to check!
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2021
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  7. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    It looks like the two back corners, next to the extra rout, are the same level as the rest of the pocket deck. Should cause no issues.
     
  8. Shumba

    Shumba TDPRI Member

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    Yes, all the corners are the same depth / level.

    If my anal-retentiveness were to get the best of me, and I wanted to fix it, what would be the best way? Some epoxy?
     
  9. Blrfl

    Blrfl Tele-Afflicted

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    If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
     
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  10. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Wecome to TDPRI! Good to see you.

    You can use sawdust and glue, wood filler, or even Bondo (automotive body filler). I've got a Squier Affinity Strat that has factory-original Bondo in the sides of the neck pocket. The next issue will be that you'll always be able to see the difference between the filler and the wood. It will always look different and that may bug you. But...

    That surface is always hidden.

    The best way to fix it is to cover it with another piece of wood, like the heel of the neck. :D If you think about it, there are better ways to use your A.R. to good effect, like getting your setup as perfect as possible. That's where A.R. is useful.
     
  11. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    There might be a strong temptation to "fix it", but since it is hidden and it's not going to have any adverse affect on playability or "tone" - I'd suggest to just leave it as-is.

    Sometimes, small repairs have an odd way of increasing in scope ;).



    edit: Yes, it's fits perfectly into that category that you mention :).

    .
     
  12. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Screw the neck on, is the geometry correct? If so don't touch it.

    If the geometry is not correct route the pocket deeper, say 20 thousands, and parallel to the top, and glue in a piece of veneer slightly thicker, say 30 thousands. Do a skim cut to bring the bottom of the pocket both at the correct depth and angle.

    ps - don't scratch the finish while you are doing all of this
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2021
  13. peterg

    peterg Tele-Meister

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    Agreed! If I try to fix a small flaw in a body I usually end up with this:
    C869BE8A-46B8-4D20-ADA1-927EF0AD2CE1.jpeg
     
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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Put the guitar together and forget it it there....this is a non issue build wise if the neck sits flat and you get the string action you want. You may recall that Fender used to put tilt mechanism on some of the CBS era guitars. Attempting to fix it could actually make things worse. Quit while you are ahead.
     
  15. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    since you asked... for that kind of thing I use automotive body putty because its easy to sand. if I want strength, I've filled divots with baking soda then hit it with superglue. or sometimes I use epoxy (and sometimes with a filler)

    gluing sandpaper to a scrap of wood makes a tool that gives even sanding
     
  16. kifla

    kifla Tele-Meister

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    Leave it as it is it's non-isue.
    Trying to "fix" it...can become an issue...please... do not go down that road;)
     
  17. Shumba

    Shumba TDPRI Member

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    I get it, I get it :)

    The temptation to try to fix even the smallest imperfection will always be there, but I wont futz with this.

    Thanks all!
     
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