Neck Builders.... How important is Qtr sawn lumber to you...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PLAYONIT, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    How so?
     
  2. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    It wasn't cut blindly....
    It was all milled on the slab or skew (/////) to avoid the large redheart, with the log being rotated...
    You couldn't buy quartersawn Eastern maple back in the day even if you wanted to, and I wanted to.... ;)
    Thus, you won't see a single quartered neck in the Blackguard Book....
     
  3. '59_Standard

    '59_Standard Tele-Holic

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    Finewoodworking QS
     
  4. Mojotron

    Mojotron Poster Extraordinaire

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    Now that is something I completely agree with :lol:
     
  5. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    So it would seem that flatsawn wood can be anything short of riftsawn... but quartersawn HAS to have cut in exact radial orientation???

    A bit a BS here methinks.
     
  6. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The wood working forum I use to frequent had a member who taught a blind person woodworking. I think she ended up being drawn to the lathe. He posted pictures of her work, and it was very stunning.
     
  7. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    A whole new perspective operating purely by feel. I've seen blind potters as well... mud lathe I guess.
     
  8. axedaddy

    axedaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    I think what has been left out of this discussion is grain orientation as it applies to usage rather than the cutting of the log. Any flatsawn neck blank can be turned on edge and have quarter sawn grain orientation. Case in point: My 2011 build challenge guitar. I had 3 flat sawn walnut neck blanks, I was not happy with the thickness and I was worried about stability. So I glued all three together and used them in a quarter sawn orientation. The neck is really stable, holds the neck screw fine and sounds awesome. I personally prefer quarter sawn necks, IMHO they are more stable, I like the look better and I have not heard a negative impact on tone.

    My point is you don't need to be so worried about flat or quarter sawn neck blanks. Just find the best lumber you can and use them in the orientation that best fits your needs. Don't be afraid to laminate multiple piece necks either. I know there is an entire debate about it effecting tone, traditional construction, etc, etc. But don't sweat that stuff just try different things and do what makes you happy.
     
  9. bluesoverlord

    bluesoverlord TDPRI Member

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    Mmmmmmm.....my Eric Johnson Strat begs to differ......
     
  10. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    Well, this is Tele Home Depot, and Leo designed that neck so that it could be made from 5/4 stock....

    So-ooo, "no"....
     
  11. axedaddy

    axedaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    So-ooo, "yes".... that was the point I made about laminating multi piece necks. 3 flat sawn neck blanks turn on edge and glued together yield 2-3 quater sawn neck blanks when re-cut.
     
  12. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    OK, got it...

    That Tele neck is such a funny design, with an obvious eye towards saving wood....
    But it works.
    Hard to find a vintage Fender with a snapped peghead, especially compared to G%$#@ns from the same era.... ;)
     
  13. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    A bit of truth in all of it , oddly .
    Riftsawn is actually a method of cutting that yields only 1/4 sawn wood and is cut radially . Much waste with very high quality .
    1/4 sawn actually refers to the grain orientation but is often used differently .
    When done properly , all riftsawn wood is 1/4 sawn but not all 1/4 sawn wood is riftsawn .
    There appears to be differing opinions as to what these terms mean by area and locale .
    The terminology that I am accustomed to is that grain from 60 degrees to 90 degrees is 1/4 sawn , grain from 30 degrees to 60 degrees is bastard cut and grain from 0 degrees to 30 degrees is flatsawn .
    Depending where the wood is taken from the log you can have wood that was cut "flatsawn" and has 1/4 sawn parts near both ends near the edge of the log . This would be near the heart of the tree . As you move away from the heart , the grain at or near the edges will have less vertical orientation .
    In the end , it matters not what you call it as long as you have the correct knowledge . Let the people that choose to declare their terminology to be the only way fight it out amongst themselves because the wood doesn't care one bit about it . As the Jefferson Airplane has sung " Say it plainly , the human name doesn't mean **** to a tree " / Eskimo Blue Day .
     
  14. jpbturbo

    jpbturbo Tele-Afflicted

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    I was thinking of EJ's model as well.
    It strikes me as interesting that he has a very bright tone live, maybe if he used flatsawn it would be too shrill.

    -josh
     
  15. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Most of the custom shop models that use Quartersawn lumber for the neck, do so in order to justify the premium price. IMHO
     
  16. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    In the world of lutherie, quartersawn means dead-on quarter (IIIIIII) with flashing medullary rays....

    Love that tune...
    Nicky is just on fire... ;)
     
  17. J.E.M.

    J.E.M. Tele-Meister

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    Hello to all, first post - been reading for a long while and finally joined, great resource you’ve created.

    I was talking with someone about this topic and I thought this would be a great place for opinions on my reasoning for using quartersawn material, aside from the possibility of flame and figure,

    In discussions regarding the pros and cons of quartersawn lumber for guitar necks, you don’t hear much mention of what I think is its most significant benefit, and that’s how little necks made with it suffer from fret sprout.

    As mentioned above cabinetmakers use quartersawn material in certain applications, take as an example “lumber core plywood” (essentially solid lumber strips glued up and veneered on both sides, for use as table tops etc), this material is made exclusively with a quartersawn core, otherwise it’ll crack the veneer faces with expansion / contraction.

    The reason quartersawn works as a substrate for lumber core plywood, is the same reason it shows little to no fret sprout when used for guitar neck – wood expands and contracts mainly across the grain.

    In a quartersawn neck (or the core of the plywood) that expansion is within the thickness of the material, not across the width – when a quartersawn neck shrinks, it get thinner front to back, with no change in width the fret ends don’t move /stick out.

    When a flat sawn neck shrinks, it does so across its width, and the fret ends do stick out.
     
  18. PraiseTele

    PraiseTele Tele-Meister

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    Thank you Ron!!
     
  19. looktoyourorb

    looktoyourorb TDPRI Member

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    Flat sawn for me, just because I do not really like the pattern of QS necks. Just cosmetic...
     
  20. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I like 3/4 sawn.
     
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