Neck Builders.... How important is Qtr sawn lumber to you...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PLAYONIT, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Chase TM

    Chase TM Tele-Meister

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    ^^ Thanks
     
  2. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    1/4 sawn wood also sources it's roots to the acoustic guitar long before Leo Fender was born .
    Because of the grain orientation , 1/4 sawn in considerably less prone to de-laminating along it's own grain because the grain runs at a 90% angle to the bend of the body sides . At 350 degrees , wood becomes very pliable at the thicknesses used in acoustic building . 1/4 sawn will fail , if it does at all , along the length of the grain during bending if it does at all . It will appear as a crack .
    With acoustic guitars , 1/4 sawn necks are of greater importance because there is considerably more mass involved , particularly because of the heel . As a side bar to this , acoustic neck block grain orientation is of great importance as well with an acoustic guitar .
    Laminated necks are very stable and strong as long as the joining process is good , compatible woods are used and grain orientation is properly considered .
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  4. mcgeorgerl

    mcgeorgerl Tele-Meister

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    For me, I just make sure the wood is the best that I can lay my hands on. Figure, grain run out, growth rings per inch...

    The whole flat sawn/quartersawn thing is interesting. Siminoff did some experiments on strength/stiffness that are in one of his books. It may be an apocryphal story but I've seen it in print several times... seems one of the old classical builders (Torres or Hauser?) actually built a guitar with paper mache` sides rather than the traditional quartersawn rosewood to prove a point. Guitar was reported to sound wonderfull. Even some of the most treasured classical guitars have "plywood" sides (usually 3 plys).

    Tops and backs of acoustic instruments... That's another story.

    Ron mentioned banjo necks... Now the banjos have a heel that is relatively thin (neck width). Necks made with no cross grain center strip that have the grain oriented "flat" have a real tendency to split. I can't remember how many of these things I've had to fix. The neck dowel hole or co-ordinator rod screws bust those heels right apart. But Fender necks have no heel to speak of so they work great.

    I have noticed one thing about old necks (banjos, guitars and mandolins). A lot of them that were nicely quartersawn and had the the grain running 90 degree to the body eventually popped the fingerboards loose. Yeah, maybe it took 75 years but the only thing I can think is that the quatersawn wood, while it doesn't change much with humidity, still moves a bit. And the fingerboard (different species and grain) moves less. The hard set hide glue then gives out. And don't blame it on the hide glue since the rest of the instrument is usually pretty tight.

    If you have access to a Fender book, check out the grain on the photos of the heels. Leo made 'em with all sorts of grain direction. So do the guys here. Don't sweat it.
     
  5. Wayne Alexander

    Wayne Alexander Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I'm not a neck builder, but I've used a bunch of them. In my own experience, quarter sawn electric guitar necks can sometimes be too stiff to respond properly to trussrod adjustments. I had one quartersawn neck that the trussrod simply wouldn't move, and that made it not so playable because the neck needed a little relief. Because of that I tend to prefer flatsawn necks, so there won't be too much resistance to what the trussrod is supposed to do.
     
  6. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    http://www.liutaiomottola.com/myth/quartersawn.htm
     
  7. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I like diagonal sawn with a slight twist. Quartersawn at the headstock and flat sawn at the heel.

    You can play them around corners. Although finding sets of bent strings is tough.
     
  8. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    Yeah, and not a single one was quartersawn...
    Or at least I've never seen one...
    (Pleeeeeze, someone post a pic of a vintage Fender with a quartersawn neck...).

    And, there is a reason for this... ;)
     
  9. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yup, quartersawn cost more.
     
  10. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Old fender necks are quartersawn, if you look at them from the side. :D
     
  11. tonewoods

    tonewoods Former Member

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    Maybe now, but not back then.....
    It was basically unavailable...
     
  12. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

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    I remember preeb posting that quarter sawn was also a "tone sucker"...
     
  13. kwerk

    kwerk Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nick incoming
     
  14. melomanarock

    melomanarock Tele-Holic

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    I think he means that when you're looking for a classic strat or tele type of sound..

    Qsawn necks and fretboards sound pretty good on Les Pauls..
     
  15. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    :lol::lol::lol:

    I can't help that the sensitivity on my bullsh!t detection meter is set to eleven. :D
     
  16. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    Wouldn't it be true that any tree cut-up blindly would yield roughly the same quantities of quartersawn an flatsawn wood?
     
  17. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    No .
    And blind people should avoid power saws .
    As far as 1/4 sawn wood sucking tone is concerned , I know of a few Martins , new and old , that are made entirely from 1/4 sawn wood that ooze tone with some to spare .
    Believe what you will , that doesn't make it real .
     
  18. ordenes10

    ordenes10 Tele-Meister

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    I have a lot of problems with flatsawn neck blanks. Before cut they are straight. after cut
    they tend to warp a little. I thought maybe the tecnique with the robosander isnt good because of the head. I tried without robosander, same problem. Is the same problem with
    quartersawn??What are you guys doing in this case. Sorry for hitchhike you thread, but maybe its a problem of quartersawn blanks
     
  19. adjason

    adjason Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I might be wrong but I think the eric johnson signature strat uses quartersawn
     
  20. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Sounds like you are using kiln dried lumber. Drying lumber in a kiln usually causes a lot of internal stress on the wood. Cutting portions of the wood allows these stresses to warp and split the wood. Older air dried lumber is way more dimensionally stable than kiln dried wood.
     
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