NAD: Barn-Aged Princeton Chorus

Recalcitrant

Tele-Meister
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Posts
354
Age
72
Location
Philadelphia
If you owned one of these you probably remember it for its fine Fender cleans and lovely stereo chorus. Fender brought forth their “II” line of solid state amps during the Rivera era in the 80s-90s, sporting mean-looking red knobs to grab the eye. The Princeton Chorus (which in no way resembles the Princeton Reverb) had spring reverb and analog overdrive, effects loop, headphone out, through 2x10 speakers, in 25W per channel stereo, all for around $300. They must’ve sold tons. I had one, and loved it until my son borrowed it permanently two decades ago.

If you owned one, have one, or know history or stories about them, I invite you to share here.

IMG-0044.jpg


It turns out this item, except for crackling pots, works very well. My brother, a hoarder, is presently moving all his [stuff] three states away, and so decided he maybe wasn’t going to learn guitar after all. Luckily for both of us I was there with the right solution.
 

RoscoeElegante

Poster Extraordinaire
Ad Free Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2015
Posts
5,260
Location
TooFarFromCanada
My first amp after a long hiatus between having/not having any electrical equipment. I've never bothered to clean its crackly-dirty knobs, but it works well for what it is. We ended up using it primarily as our bass amp in a small group and venue. Nice solid cleans, and the chorus is useful. The other features...not so much.
 

Apollwn

TDPRI Member
Joined
May 25, 2019
Posts
11
Age
51
Location
Spain
I had one of these many years ago. Great amp with lovely Fender clean tones, but too loud. I don't think I ever really turned the volume past 2 or 3, and it would still be too much. I had to move it on and bought a smaller amp that I could use in my flat.
 

zencat

TDPRI Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Posts
43
Location
california
If you owned one of these you probably remember it for its fine Fender cleans and lovely stereo chorus. Fender brought forth their “II” line of solid state amps during the Rivera era in the 80s-90s, sporting mean-looking red knobs to grab the eye. The Princeton Chorus (which in no way resembles the Princeton Reverb) had spring reverb and analog overdrive, effects loop, headphone out, through 2x10 speakers, in 25W per channel stereo, all for around $300. They must’ve sold tons. I had one, and loved it until my son borrowed it permanently two decades ago.

If you owned one, have one, or know history or stories about them, I invite you to share here.

View attachment 1050938

It turns out this item, except for crackling pots, works very well. My brother, a hoarder, is presently moving all his [stuff] three states away, and so decided he maybe wasn’t going to learn guitar after all. Luckily for both of us I was there with the right solution.
I had one about twenty years ago as a bedroom/rehearsal amp. It was the black knob - silver grill version. Great tones out of it. Very nice chorus. Pleasing lead channel with smooth distortion. Eventually not loud enough for rehearsal.
 

Churchjack

Tele-Holic
Joined
Oct 22, 2017
Posts
560
Location
Texas
I had one, from a pawn shop, must have been a later model. The knobs weren't red (maybe just on the tips?), and had a DSP section had a variety of very useful modulations, flanger, chorus, different 'verbs. Great squeeky cleans. I think it even had a short delay built in? I recall that I was able to dial in a sound just like Cross Canadian Ragweed. My nephew has it now.

It was the amp that got me thinking about tubes, and perceiving the whole signal chain as one instrument. And concluding that $guitar thru $$$amp > $$$guitar thru $amp. I sure do miss it!
 

myfenderissues

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jul 21, 2012
Posts
106
Location
houston
they
If you owned one of these you probably remember it for its fine Fender cleans and lovely stereo chorus. Fender brought forth their “II” line of solid state amps during the Rivera era in the 80s-90s, sporting mean-looking red knobs to grab the eye. The Princeton Chorus (which in no way resembles the Princeton Reverb) had spring reverb and analog overdrive, effects loop, headphone out, through 2x10 speakers, in 25W per channel stereo, all for around $300. They must’ve sold tons. I had one, and loved it until my son borrowed it permanently two decades ago.

If you owned one, have one, or know history or stories about them, I invite you to share here.

View attachment 1050938

It turns out this item, except for crackling pots, works very well. My brother, a hoarder, is presently moving all his [stuff] three states away, and so decided he maybe wasn’t going to learn guitar after all. Luckily for both of us I was there with the right solution.
they don't sound good. but it\s ok for a practice amp. maybe bring 75 dollars on the used market.
 

myfenderissues

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jul 21, 2012
Posts
106
Location
houston
I had one, from a pawn shop, must have been a later model. The knobs weren't red (maybe just on the tips?), and had a DSP section had a variety of very useful modulations, flanger, chorus, different 'verbs. Great squeeky cleans. I think it even had a short delay built in? I recall that I was able to dial in a sound just like Cross Canadian Ragweed. My nephew has it now.

It was the amp that got me thinking about tubes, and perceiving the whole signal chain as one instrument. And concluding that $guitar thru $$$amp > $$$guitar thru $amp. I sure do miss it!
years ago i'd check out pawn shops out for music stuff occasionally, but i have to say i never saw anything related to guitars or amps in a pawn shop that wasn't broken in some way
 

Old Plank

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Feb 16, 2017
Posts
3,237
Location
Maine USA
All I have to add, is that I really wanted one and liked playing thru a friend's, but then found a '68 Super Reverb at the same price and went with that.
 

schmee

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Posts
22,727
Location
northwest
I had one for a while. In some ways I liked it (for SS anyway) It's a $175 amp. I paid $150 for a clean one that was available a long time. People are trying to get more though, especially now days. The chorus was nice. Forget the OD channel.
There was one thing I couldn't resolve on it though; Setting the tone seemed to be impossible, it went from harsh to mud with a tiny tiny rotate of the treble pot. Maybe the tone pots were all interactive, not sure. I just could not quite get in the zone. Otherwise I would have kept it just for goofing around. Sold to a buddy for his keyboard at home.
 

eichaan

Tele-Holic
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Posts
572
Age
52
Location
Richmond, VA
I had one about twenty years ago as a bedroom/rehearsal amp. It was the black knob - silver grill version. Great tones out of it. Very nice chorus. Pleasing lead channel with smooth distortion. Eventually not loud enough for rehearsal.
My experience was exactly like Zencat's. I got mine in 1993-ish and kept it for 10 years until it just didn't work for my band. I wish I had more understanding of FX loops back then.
 

Willie Johnson

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 24, 2016
Posts
3,189
Age
103
Location
Chicagoland
I tried to buy one used and they sent me a Princeton Reverb instead. Oops.

I do really want one of the older analog solid state Fenders with spring reverb and an effects loop. A made in Japan Sidekick 30 or similar with a nice high sensitivity speaker would be cool.
 

Mechanic

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Apr 1, 2009
Posts
2,587
Location
Over the hill and far awa
I on one and played it tonight. Drive channels aren’t the greatest. Tone circuit works by cutting the volume i its range. I like to keep the pots at 5-7 or above that and cut what I don’t want. There is an owners page in the amp club section.
 

foundjoe

Tele-Holic
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Posts
742
Location
Kansas
I was enamored by the stereo chorus and stereo effects loop, but it was too clean to the point of sounding flat and lifeless. The OD was harsh and fizzy. I had downsized from a Twin Reverb, but didn’t realize I was losing all the tone. Sold it long ago and do not miss it.
 




Top