My thoughts on the 3 barrel brass bridge...

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by junkman510, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Calaham makes stainless bridge height screws.
     
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  2. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Came that way from what factory? What is this? Looks like it solves a couple of persistent Tele problems.
     
  3. Tone Chase

    Tone Chase Tele-Meister

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    This came on a Peavey Vintage Generation EXP ‘Tele’ that I happened upon. So many things that just seemed right, caught my attention on this inexpensive, out of production guitar. It has a humbucker in the neck, and both pickups just sound right as is. I bought most of the parts to build something like this guitar, and then I found this gem, already complete and assembled. It just needed my personal tweaks.

    I have an American Deluxe, an American Nashville Deluxe B bender, a recent MIM Standard, and several other oddball Telecaster guitars. I have sold a half dozen others. So if I am keeping it, it has to offer something worth keeping.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
  4. Backbeat8

    Backbeat8 Tele-Holic

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    Hadn't thought of this, yes I agree, even if I don't technically understand the physics, I innately have felt that the simple 3 barrel, with no two point of contact, will create more "structural integrity". The roundness factor is a further indication of your deep insight into this aspect of tone. I am just looking at the different types of compensation now, and seeing those "slants" (basically acting like jagged corners, thus reducing contact area. Contact area would seem to be important imo, especially when dealing with the electro-acoustic impact of the system. Noticing to that the Am Pro I have my eyes on all have this very "Compensated" style saddle, even though it's "vintage" and brass, the blurb says how it will give perfect intonation and be the "best of both worlds".....the real philosophical question is: why do we want perfect intonation? And what real advancements have we actually made since the first tele was made, in the field of electro acoustics? It seems that basically none, we still use basically the same pickups, same components, and it's basically the same, electro-magnetism hasn't "changed", so it becomes more an more possible/probable, that the first time we "figured it out", we did it, it was robust, and "natural", insofar as electricity can be "natural", magnets are natural. And there is a way to either use "natural" electro-magnetism, in its "pure/raw" form, vs in the recent past we have invented "digital", which allows us to store "info" "digitally" (a sequence of digits) and then reproduce it electro-acoustically (mp3>speaker etc).

    I myself can't stand it when my acoustic guitar is out of tune. I recently was having massive tuning problems and realized it was my truss rod that I had cranked way too far outward. There are many reasons why people could have tuning problems, but I would think that by actually reducing the contact point from 6 to 3, you are actually increasing the "fidelity" of the system.
    the other aspect is the distance of the screws/springs, isn't that why we have them any way, that's what allow us to fine tune the intonation, by increasing/decreasing the distance we change the angle and distance of the vibrating string. Any other inconsistency could be brand new strings also, lots of variables.

    But again, why do I want "perfect" intonation, I want "stable" intonation, at least to some extent. I want tuning stability, but if there are some very minor inconsistencies that simply need to be "re-calibrated" every so often, just like any acoustic, where you have to adjust if you bending alot etc, then thats just part of the instrument. That all contributes to the "experience" of the instrument. It changes literally everything about your relationship with the instrument and the way you relate to it, and the way you play it. And I personally want that experience to be as "natural" as possible. Tbs, my acoustic (made in 2017) has a compensated nut. And it works very well. There are two main "cutouts" creating a slightly slope from 6e to 3g, then the slope is "reset" and another slope starts from 2b to 1e
     
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  5. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    I am also using the Gotoh modern 6 saddle with chrome plated brass on my American Special Tele and I don’t know whether it’s the Area T bridge pickup or this bridge, or both, but this American Special out-Teles my other Teles which have some very popular custom winder single coil bridge pickups and Fender’s regular modern bridges. The output is full, crystal clear, and filled with sparkly rich overtones. I though it was mostly the Area T bridge pickup, and that may be the biggest factor, but the Gotoh bridge may have something to do with it too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2018
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  6. tdu

    tdu Friend of Leo's

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    It's all up to what feels best for the player. I would venture to guess if I listed to a video by the OP, with how well he plays, where he's playing a 6 saddle bridge and barrel bridge, I would hear very little difference. In my own playing, I neither feel nor hear much difference. I have only owned 2 Teles with a 6 saddle setup, and it never bothered me enough to be motivated to mod the guitars.
     
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  7. AndrewG

    AndrewG Friend of Leo's

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    We'll never get perfect intonation; it's mathematically impossible given equal tempered tuning, and Fender touting 'perfect' intonation is a bit naughty. The best we can hope for is a close approximation. To be honest my old '57 Les Paul Junior played nicely 'in tune' with nothing but a plain wrapover bridge/tailpiece with minimal fore and aft adjustability.
    Just don't attempt to set up intonation on a three-barrel bridge using just an electronic tuner. There's an exercise in futility! Jerry Donahue uses an interesting method:
    https://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/...donahue-on-telecaster-style-bridge-intonation
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2018
  8. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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    Cool combination of saddles... never seen that before. The center compensated one takes care of most intonation problems and the E-B saddle keeps the skinny strings from shifting and buzzing against the screws.
    I wonder if you can tell if there is a difference in tone with the compensated saddle since it has a sharp point for both strings??
     
  9. Tone Chase

    Tone Chase Tele-Meister

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    @junkman510, I have only had this guitar for a couple of months, and leave it out on the stand. I try to play it a little every day, and make adjustments until I feel it is right for me.

    I bought it on a whim. The guitar just had so many interesting features, and seemed to have a decent feel to it. Plugging it in when I got home with it was a surprise, in a good way.

    The tall frets, and setting intonation is taking me a little longer, because I am very fussy. The need to compromise, seems significantly less on the compensating saddle. It was actually pretty easy and seems spot on.

    The E and B string were also easy. It is the A string, that is at times a little sharp due to tall frets and playing technique. I will get it spot on eventually.
    I just have more of a desire to play than tweak. Having over 30 guitars to tweak, makes me lean towards the most stable of the guitars, to actually get some playing time in.
     
  10. brobar

    brobar Tele-Holic

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    I lost some of that lower-end spank I like when I went from steel to all brass. But I still preferred the tone of brass overall. So I put an aluminum E/A saddle on there with the brass and it was the best of both worlds. Love the combo... went that route on all my teles.

    787D2555-6024-4C90-939B-B0CF2B734E7B.jpeg
     
  11. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have an old Telecaster with 3 bridge pieces that are simply pieces of threaded shaft cut to length. I don't know what material these 'saddles' are made of. They say I could intonate it better by bending the length-adjustment screws, but after 35 years or so nobody has ever mentioned that my intonation is off, so I have never done this.

    Mine look like these:
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. PelhamSG

    PelhamSG Tele-Meister

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    Ill add that I also have the vintage style 3 barrel and I have no problems with intonation. Was pretty much spot on from the factory
     
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  13. bluzkat

    bluzkat Tele-Holic

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    I use an aluminum saddle for the E/A (the others are brass) on all my Teles except my Elite that has a modern bridge.
     
  14. TheletterJ

    TheletterJ Tele-Afflicted

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    I came here for that pick guard!
     
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  15. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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  16. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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    It is ridiculous when they advertise 'perfect tuning' on a guitar... it can't happen. You can get closer but as you play, pressure on the strings, string height, age of strings, etc... changes intonation anyway. It really is the beauty of the guitar sound IMO. If I wanted perfect, I would play a piano.
     
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  17. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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    Damn! 30 guitars? Nice harem you got there... and I bet some jealous guitars. I need to add to mine... that sounds like a guitar that I would be interested in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2018
  18. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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    Holy Cow! 30 guitars? Nice harem you got there... and I bet some jealous guitars. I need to add to mine... that sounds like a guitar that I would be interested in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2018
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  19. junkman510

    junkman510 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks, I didn't think about the break angle. It is a very important point. Sooo many things affect the guitar tone.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2018
  20. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ironically, we were never really supposed to see it.
     
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